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Louis Farrakhan

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By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | November 18, 1993
Louis T. Farrakhan, the black separatist leader of the Nation of Islam whose anti-Semitism placed him on the fringes of the civil rights movement for years, will preach at 6 p.m. Sunday in West Baltimore's Bethel AME Church.It is a sign of the increasing acceptance of Mr. Farrakhan in the mainstream black community. Bethel's staff and large congregation play an influential role in African-American church affairs.Bethel AME, at 1300 Druid Hill Ave., was the site during the recent National Council of Churches meeting in Baltimore of an interdenominational service of installation for the Rev. Gordon L. Sommers, new president of the nation's largest ecumenical organization.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Morgan State University is working with a group that intends to bring Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan to speak on campus this fall, a university spokesman said Saturday. Spokesman Clint Coleman said a local Nation of Islam chapter, the Student Government Association and the Collegiate 100 of Morgan State University were organizing the event, planned as a two-day affair with panels and lectures with Farrakhan as the keynote speaker. Coleman said the organizers were originally looking at a date this month, but due to issues with scheduling and venue are now working to set a date in the fall.
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NEWS
October 22, 1995
LOUIS FARRAKHAN is the leader of The Nation of Islam, an organization that traces its roots to Wallace D. Fard, who established mosques in Detroit and Chicago in the early 1930s.Fard told his followers that he was the incarnation of Allah and promised that his teachings would deliver them from the yoke of white oppression.In 1934, Fard disappeared and was succeeded by one of his lieutenants, Elijah Muhammad, who was born Elijah Poole in Sandersville, Ga., in 1897.Elijah Muhammad met Fard in Detroit and became one of his most devoted followers.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | October 19, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Prior to the Millions More event in Washington last weekend - led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan - a group of participants gathered at Howard University. It looked like a meeting of the kook fringe as speaker after speaker engaged in the wildest of conspiracy theories about why blacks who are poor continue to be mired in misery. According to some, Hurricane Katrina was a plot by the Bush administration to eliminate their "black problem." Maybe President Bush didn't create the hurricane, but he was responsible for blowing up the levees so that blacks in New Orleans would drown, thus easing welfare payments and reducing the number of black Democratic voters.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Elaine Tassy contributed to this article | October 6, 1995
The Million Man March, Louis Farrakhan's plan for a huge rally on Washington's Mall to show America "a vastly different picture of the black male," has grown into an event with support from well beyond the black separatist leader's circle.Mainstream leaders such as the Congressional Black Caucus, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke have endorsed the Oct. 16 march. Organizing efforts across the nation are rooted in black churches as well as Minister Farrakhan's Nation of Islam.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 1, 1994
Norway won the Olympics: Home slope advantage.NATO was formed to fight Russia but finally went into action, against the Bosnian Serbs.Louis Farrakhan, 1; civil rights leaders, 0.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 15, 1994
Louis Farrakhan and Al Sharpton have made Baltimore more famous than the latest John Waters movie.The Japanese have done their homework and know that Americans are secret suckers for royalty.North Korea is not crazy. It just knows how to get our attention.And to think that in February you were wishing for the return of heat waves.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 4, 1994
Baltimore can steal a Los Angeles NFL team thanks to the quake. That's why they are called the Raiders.In order to de-nuclearize the Korean peninsula, strategic thinkers of the U. S. Senate propose to reintroduce U.S. nuclear weapons there.When Kweisi Mfume and Ben Chavis thought to take over Louis Farrakhan, they were out of their league.Bruce Bereano is being investigated for being too good at his job.
NEWS
By Robert Girardi | November 9, 1995
''White supremacy caused Napoleon to blow the nose off the Sphinx because it reminded [him] too much of the black man's majesty.''-- Louis Farrakhan, October 16ON THE 19th of May, 1798, a young French general nameNapoleon Bonaparte set off in his flagship L'Orient for the conquest of Egypt. The Mediterranean crossing was calm, Napoleon's officers found time to read, and several chose popular romantic novels of the day: Goethe's ''Sorrows of Young Werther,'' Bernardin de St. Pierre's ''Paul and Virginia.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | June 10, 1994
LOUIS Farrakhan rolls into town this weekend to attend the three-day summit on black leadership sponsored by the NAACP, and there are many who question why he was invited.The reasons are several. Not the least is that Mr. Farrakhan's popularity should not be underestimated. For years he has filled the charisma void created in the American black nationalist community by the death of Malcolm X in 1965. His formidable oratorical skills helped propel him into that position.I attended the Nation of Islam's Savior's Day convention in 1975 -- more out of respect for Elijah Muhammad, who had died the previous day, than with any intention of joining the organization.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 7, 2005
MINISTER Jamil Muhammad, the national spokesman for the Nation of Islam, pointed last Friday night to Minister Farajii Muhammad as a prime example of what their leader, Minister Louis Farrakhan, is trying to accomplish. "He's the youth minister for Mosque Six," said Jamil Muhammad, who at one time was the minister in charge of that mosque, which sits on Garrison Boulevard near Liberty Heights Avenue. Farajii Muhammad is 26 years old. He wore a bow tie, a sharp dark suit and a white shirt.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 18, 2000
SO THERE WAS one Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam leader, standing on a podium in front of the U.S. Capitol on Monday, delivering the keynote address at the Million Family March his sect had organized. It was the fifth anniversary of the Million Man March, when more than 1 million black men - depending on whose estimate you believe - gathered in the nation's capital. Atonement was the theme then. On Monday, atonement, family, ecumenicalism and brotherhood were the themes. The Nation of Islam leader mentioned all four frequently in his three-hour peroration.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Mark Hughes was a sixth-grade teacher at Lombard Middle School in 1995, watching the Million Man March on CNN with his pupils. Hughes resolved that if a similar event were to happen, he would be there in person. On Monday, he will get his chance. The Million Family March, which Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and other organizers have said will be a more inclusive successor to the Million Man March, will take place on the National Mall amid busloads of visitors (local organizers estimate 250,000 will travel from Baltimore)
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 16, 2000
IT'S BEEN MORE than a year since some folks cheered the impending death of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. Those of you who did know who you are. When word of Farrakhan's prostate cancer hit newspapers, television and radio, some grinned and chuckled and cackled at the prospect of the "Jew-baiting black racist's" impending demise. Some, no doubt, danced a joyous jig. There was only one problem: Farrakhan wasn't dead yet. On Thursday, just before 8:50 p.m., one Louis Farrakhan, resplendent in an impeccably tailored, double-breasted, royal blue suit, walked in front of an overflow crowd at the Bread of Life Cathedral.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 6, 2000
IMAM E. Abdulmalik Mohammed, the young leader of the Muslim American Society in Baltimore, noticed something missing in the large gathering of Muslims inside Chicago's United Center last week. There were no pictures of Elijah Muhammad, the founder of the Nation of Islam, and none of the "black god," W.D. Farad. Black-and-white images of those men were always standard at the Nation of Islam's most important annual meeting, Saviour's Day. But not this Saviour's Day. Abdulmalik noticed something else.
TOPIC
By Jeff Cohen | October 3, 1999
IN RECENT DAYS, Patrick J. Buchanan has vehemently denied accusations of bigotry stemming from his new book, which questions U.S. intervention in World War II. And he has accused the news media -- including CNN, which provided the national platform from which he has repeatedly catapulted into presidential politics -- of distorted reporting.Since Buchanan sees himself as a student of history, it's appropriate to check the historical record of Buchanan's comments and writings. This refresher course in Buchananism sheds light on whether mainstream media have been unfair to him -- or too soft.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | February 10, 1994
THE NATIONAL Association for the Advancement of Colored People has done a grave disservice to African Americans by pretending Louis Farrakhan is not a hater and a bigot.In firing an aide last week for making "mean-spirited" anti-Semitic remarks -- but at the same time defending the "truth" of those remarks -- Mr. Farrakhan stayed true to his usual tactics of paranoid rhetoric and double talk.This is the Louis Farrakhan who frightens white America, the quintessential demagogue who operates by the old adage that "two wrongs don't make a right -- but it damn sure makes it even."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 2, 1995
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- A sigh of relief went up in the black community following the settlement of the case against Qubilah Shabazz in an alleged murder-for-hire scheme.The deal, announced yesterday, keeps in place charges that Ms. Shabazz tried to arrange the murder of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.Suspicions linger, however, about the government's case against the 34-year-old daughter of slain civic rights leader Malcolm X, about whether she may have been entrapped and about the man with the shady past who was the government's star witness.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 6, 1998
THE CRITICAL racial issue for Americans in the 21st century will not be race, but class.There. I said it and I'm glad I did.It is not hard to think it. Many of us Americans, particularly us African-Americans, have known it and felt it with great certainty for years.But, it has been quite difficult to say out loud or write in public without subjecting yourself to the slings and arrows of critics.That's how sociology professor William Julius Wilson, then at the University of Chicago, was greeted by many when he titled his very important book, "The Declining Significance of Race," 20 years ago. Many of his fellow liberals accused him of selling out to the enemies of civil rights when he dared write something that already was becoming quite obvious: In the wake of civil-rights reforms, economic class was becoming a more important predictor than one's race of one's economic chances in life.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 10, 1997
I'VE BEEN black for many years. I've been too black for about six.That's how long I've been a newspaper columnist. Six years in which a succession of editors, a handful of race-phobic white readers and a smattering of fire-breathing black ones have sought to adjust the black content in my writing the way you would the picture on an old television.''Too black,'' they complain, followed moments later by, ''Not black enough.'' And that's just the editors.A Louis FarrakhanThe readers are worse.
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