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By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | September 29, 1991
Q: Enclosed is a picture of my brace-back Windsor chair; it is in excellent condition. It is marked "Wallace Nutting" and "326." It also has a label listing the other furniture that he made. Please provide information and price.A: Wallace Nutting made reproductions of American Colonial furniture. This represents the finest example of its kind. It was probably made about 1910 to 1920 and would sell for $700 to $800.Q: This mark is on the bottom of a teapot. It is fine porcelain and decorated with pink and yellow roses trimmed with gold.
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NEWS
June 21, 2010
The appeal of great works of art is timeless, but the great museums that house them must constantly keep up with the times. Museum directors know they can't let a leaky roof or a malfunctioning climate-control system spoil the pleasure visitors expect. Even the décor of the settings in which art is enjoyed — the colors on the walls, the shape of the galleries, the style of the picture frames — has to be updated periodically to keep pace with changing fashion and tastes. So news that the Baltimore Museum of Art, one of the stars in the city's cultural firmament, is embarking on an ambitious, $24 million expansion and renovation shows that museum director Doreen Bolger remains committed to the mission she announced upon her arrival in 1998: expanding the museum's audience, making its offerings more accessible to visitors and, above all, maintaining its reputation as a world-class venue for exhibitions and scholarly research.
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NEWS
June 21, 2010
The appeal of great works of art is timeless, but the great museums that house them must constantly keep up with the times. Museum directors know they can't let a leaky roof or a malfunctioning climate-control system spoil the pleasure visitors expect. Even the décor of the settings in which art is enjoyed — the colors on the walls, the shape of the galleries, the style of the picture frames — has to be updated periodically to keep pace with changing fashion and tastes. So news that the Baltimore Museum of Art, one of the stars in the city's cultural firmament, is embarking on an ambitious, $24 million expansion and renovation shows that museum director Doreen Bolger remains committed to the mission she announced upon her arrival in 1998: expanding the museum's audience, making its offerings more accessible to visitors and, above all, maintaining its reputation as a world-class venue for exhibitions and scholarly research.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Baltimore Museum of Art leaders unveiled plans on Tuesday to complete a $24 million renovation in time for the institution's 100 t h anniversary in 2014, a three-year project that will require some galleries to be closed in phases starting early next year. The museum's director, Doreen Bolger, and its fundraising campaign co-chair, Sandra Levi Gerstung, announced that the museum has raised more than half the funds needed for the project, including a commitment of $10 million over four years from the state of Maryland and a $1.25 million bond issue from the city of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | November 8, 1992
Are those sleek, elegant, modern, bentwood upholstered armchairs by Tiffany and Tiffany in Murphy Brown's living room destined for prime time at antiques shows a century from now?Will chrome and glass cocktail tables endure? What about Barbie dolls?Terrific opportunities are coming to see and buy the best of 20th century design. Sanford Smith's annual Modernism show is scheduled for Nov. 19-22 at New York's Seventh Regiment Armory, and clones are proliferating throughout the country. Sotheby's is auctioning dealer Barry Friedman's landmark collection of modern design in New York Nov. 19, and Cincinnati's Don Treadway is holding another of his popular 20th century furnishings auctions Nov. 15 at the John Toomey Gallery in Oak Park, Ill.Just in time for these sales, scores of antiques dealers, decorators, and collectors around the country were asked to do the impossible: gaze into a crystal ball and predict what 20th century creations may be hot 100 years from now. What follows is a hit parade of some of this century's classics, arranged by decade.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Baltimore Museum of Art leaders unveiled plans on Tuesday to complete a $24 million renovation in time for the institution's 100 t h anniversary in 2014, a three-year project that will require some galleries to be closed in phases starting early next year. The museum's director, Doreen Bolger, and its fundraising campaign co-chair, Sandra Levi Gerstung, announced that the museum has raised more than half the funds needed for the project, including a commitment of $10 million over four years from the state of Maryland and a $1.25 million bond issue from the city of Baltimore.
NEWS
May 10, 1995
Ernest H. Martin, 75, a Broadway producer who with partner Cy Feuer, produced the Tony-winning musicals "Guys and Dolls" and "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," died Sunday of liver cancer in Los Angeles.The team's first success was 1948's "Where's Charley?" starring Ray Bolger and choreographed by George Balanchine. "Guys and Dolls" followed in 1950. "Can-Can" in 1953 starred Gwen Verdon. The American production of "The Boy Friend" in 1954 introduced Julie Andrews to Broadway and was followed by "Silk Stockings" in 1955.
NEWS
May 8, 1995
Thomas Anthony Harris, 85, a psychiatrist who wrote the 1969 book "I'm OK You're OK," died Thursday in Sacramento, Calif., of a heart attack.A career medical officer in the Navy, he was present during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, where he served aboard the USS Pelias. He suffered ear injuries during the attack that plagued him throughout his life.He retired from the Navy in 1954 as a commander, then became chief of Washington state's Department of Institutions, where he was credited with playing a pivotal role in quelling a riot at the maximum-security prison at Walla Walla.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | May 1, 1994
Q: Enclosed is a picture of a lamp that I have. It looks like a Tiffany but has no markings. It is in perfect shape. Could it be a lamp he made before he became famous?Do you think it is a Tiffany lamp and what is its monetary value?A: Although this is a handsome example of a slag glass lamp with a metal overlay, it was not made by Tiffany. All Tiffany lamps were signed.In the 1890s Louis Comfort Tiffany began designing and producing lamps. The bases were bronze and the shades were made of leaded stained glass.
NEWS
November 12, 1993
The most imposing building on the U.S. Naval Academy's sprawling campus in Annapolis is the 85-year-old chapel, easily recognizable from its copper-covered dome towering 192 feet in the air.Shaped like a Roman cross, the building is one of the most popular tourist attractions in one of the most popular tourist cities in Maryland. Weddings and funerals are held in its sanctuaries, which boast large stained-glass windows designed in the studios of Louis Comfort Tiffany.The chapel also contains the crypt of John Paul Jones, the gallant and colorful Revolutionary War officer who gave the Navy its earliest traditions of heroism and victory.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | November 8, 1992
Are those sleek, elegant, modern, bentwood upholstered armchairs by Tiffany and Tiffany in Murphy Brown's living room destined for prime time at antiques shows a century from now?Will chrome and glass cocktail tables endure? What about Barbie dolls?Terrific opportunities are coming to see and buy the best of 20th century design. Sanford Smith's annual Modernism show is scheduled for Nov. 19-22 at New York's Seventh Regiment Armory, and clones are proliferating throughout the country. Sotheby's is auctioning dealer Barry Friedman's landmark collection of modern design in New York Nov. 19, and Cincinnati's Don Treadway is holding another of his popular 20th century furnishings auctions Nov. 15 at the John Toomey Gallery in Oak Park, Ill.Just in time for these sales, scores of antiques dealers, decorators, and collectors around the country were asked to do the impossible: gaze into a crystal ball and predict what 20th century creations may be hot 100 years from now. What follows is a hit parade of some of this century's classics, arranged by decade.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | September 29, 1991
Q: Enclosed is a picture of my brace-back Windsor chair; it is in excellent condition. It is marked "Wallace Nutting" and "326." It also has a label listing the other furniture that he made. Please provide information and price.A: Wallace Nutting made reproductions of American Colonial furniture. This represents the finest example of its kind. It was probably made about 1910 to 1920 and would sell for $700 to $800.Q: This mark is on the bottom of a teapot. It is fine porcelain and decorated with pink and yellow roses trimmed with gold.
NEWS
February 6, 2005
Program scheduled for high school seniors Anne Arundel County high school seniors and their families are invited to Northeast High School at 7 p.m. tomorrow to explore post-graduation options. The program, "What Does the Future Hold for You?," will include an overview of jobs in the 21st century and a panel discussion by a representative of Anne Arundel Community College, a military recruiter and a local businessman. Participants also can take a short career interest inventory. For more information: 410-437-6400.
NEWS
November 12, 1993
The most imposing building on the U.S. Naval Academy's sprawling campus in Annapolis is the 85-year-old chapel, easily recognizable from its copper-covered dome towering 192 feet toward the sky.Shaped like a Roman cross, the building has long been one of the most popular tourist attractions in one of the most popular tourist cities in Maryland. Countless weddings and funerals have taken place in its sanctuaries, which boast large stained glass windows designed in the studios of Louis Comfort Tiffany.
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