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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 17, 1990
Tom Williams, a 28-year-old Army jazz trumpeter raised in Baltimore's Forest Park, one recent weekend acted out the "Hit the Road Jack" song routine of his old boss Ray Charles.He ended the period winning the $5000 second place prize in the Louis Armstrong International Trumpet Competition at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, beating out all but one of the original 300 contestants who sent in tapes.Baltimore jazz fans will get a chance to hear Williams' playing when Morgan State University's radio station WEAA FM (88.9)
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By PHOTOS BY DOUG KAPUSTIN and PHOTOS BY DOUG KAPUSTIN,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 3, 2005
A throwback to the 1940s and '50s, the Cadillac Parade and Royal Theater Music Festival was revived for the ninth year Saturday. The original Cadillac Parade was a major event in the city's black community, in which Baltimoreans would ride along or watch as Cadillacs cruised down Pennsylvania Avenue. Before the 1960s, The Avenue was a center of commerce and night life, home to the Royal Theater, the Lucky Number Club and the exclusive Sphinx Club. Jazz greats including Cab Calloway, Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong and John Coltrane performed here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
Baltimore-born bass player Ben Wolfe is on the phone in a hotel room in North Carolina talking about Louis Armstrong and about the stand-up string bass and about jazz, which is the music he loves to play."
NEWS
September 14, 2005
Joe Smitherman, 75, whose decades as a councilman and mayor in Selma, Ala., included the turbulent civil rights era, died Sunday in a Montgomery hospital. A former appliance salesman, Mr. Smitherman was a 34-year- old city councilman when first elected mayor in 1964 as a segregationist. At the time, about 150 blacks were registered to vote in Selma. Six months later, marchers seeking equal voting rights were beaten by police on a Selma bridge in what came to be known as "Bloody Sunday."
NEWS
By Miriam Hill and Miriam Hill,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 2, 2003
NEW YORK - For a few sweet, sultry seconds recently, the notes of Louis Armstrong's gold-plated trumpet once again blew magically over working-class Queens. It was a sound that serenaded 107th Street for almost 30 years beginning in 1943, when Armstrong's wife, Lucille, bought the modest frame house where the jazz legend often played for neighborhood children, who called him "Pops." When the city of New York unveiled the house as a museum, the Gully Low Jazz Band, featuring clarinetest Joe Muranyi, who once played with Armstrong, transformed the street into a New Orleans-style party.
TRAVEL
By Bill Rankin and Bill Rankin,Cox News Service | December 26, 2004
By the time Louis Armstrong moved into his first real home in 1943, he had already transformed American music. With his soaring trumpet, unmistakable voice and dazzling sense of rhythm, Satchmo enchanted audiences throughout the world. But he often lived out of a suitcase, spending more than 300 days a year on the road. So when Armstrong's fourth wife, Lucille, said she wanted a house, he let her buy one and decorate it before he'd ever seen it. Now called the Louis Armstrong House & Archives, the home at 34-56 107th St. in the Corona neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., is a national landmark and open to tourists.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For many, the enduring image of Louis Armstrong comes from his later years, the days of old Satchmo with horn and white handkerchief, smiling and bugging his eyes before another raspy-voiced chorus of "Hello Dolly."While that is a true image, there are others: the eminently stylish young man gazing in wonder at the instrument of his magic; the remarkable musician whose brilliant solo on "West End Blues" still wins admirers almost 70 years later; the little boy riding atop a junk cart in turn-of-the-century New Orleans, a tin horn at his lips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | August 5, 2001
Only God could have created Louis Armstrong. Who else would take a little black boy, put him on a junk wagon rolling through the muddy streets of New Orleans in 1907, tin horn in hand, and let him blow a child's prelude to a life no one could have imagined? Louis Armstrong would have been 100 years old yesterday, which is reason enough to commemorate the indelible mark he left on our culture. If you don't immediately recognize his brilliant horn, or his 1,000-watt smile, then surely you know his voice, gravelly and rough, a soulful bullfrog of a voice.
NEWS
July 17, 1998
Beryl Bryden, 78, a jazz singer dubbed "Britain's queen of the blues" by Ella Fitzgerald, died in London on Tuesday of cancer. In a career spanning 50 years, she performed with many of the jazz greats, including Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong.Pub Date: 7/17/98
NEWS
May 3, 2002
John Francis "Jack" Cullen, 80, a madcap disc jockey who befriended Bob Hope and was blacklisted by Frank Sinatra for a bootleg recording, died Saturday in Vancouver, British Columbia. Mr. Cullen was best known during five decades at CKNW as host of the late show Owl Prowl. A nostalgia act in his last years, Cullen was taken off the air in a station shake-up in 1999. A Vancouver native, Mr. Cullen served as a naval wireless operator in World War II and was hired at CKNW in 1949. He interviewed virtually every entertainer who came to town, becoming friends with Hope, Sammy Davis Jr. and Henry Mancini.
NEWS
September 3, 2005
THE MEMORY of things gone is important to a jazz musician. Things like old folks singing in the moonlight in the back yard on a hot night or something said long ago. Louis Armstrong One of my choice amusements during my stay in New Orleans was going down to the old French Market, especially of a Sunday morning. ... I remember I nearly always on these occasions got a large cup of delicious coffee with a biscuit, for my breakfast, from the immense shining copper kettle of a great Creole mulatto woman (I believe she weigh'd 230 pounds)
TRAVEL
By Bill Rankin and Bill Rankin,Cox News Service | December 26, 2004
By the time Louis Armstrong moved into his first real home in 1943, he had already transformed American music. With his soaring trumpet, unmistakable voice and dazzling sense of rhythm, Satchmo enchanted audiences throughout the world. But he often lived out of a suitcase, spending more than 300 days a year on the road. So when Armstrong's fourth wife, Lucille, said she wanted a house, he let her buy one and decorate it before he'd ever seen it. Now called the Louis Armstrong House & Archives, the home at 34-56 107th St. in the Corona neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., is a national landmark and open to tourists.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
There's nothing unusual these days about a hospital marketing itself, but the advertising campaign unveiled yesterday by Johns Hopkins Medicine is a bit different. Although it will eventually run in Baltimore, the campaign is starting nearly 200 miles away, in New York City. It doesn't mention any specific Hopkins services, and rather than showing Hopkins doctors or Hopkins patients, it invokes such figures as jazz great Louis Armstrong, movie star Ingrid Bergman and Winston Churchill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Staff | October 17, 2004
Are you hip enough to read a book on the history of hip? To paraphrase what Louis Armstrong said about jazz, if you have to ask the question, you already know the answer. But here are some ways to make sure: If you drink Pabst Blue Ribbon while wearing a trucker hat and listening to the Strokes, forget it. If you registered for Friendster within the last year or style your hair into a faux-hawk and take part in flash mobs, forget it. If you use the word metrosexual. If -- heaven help us -- you are a metrosexual.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 3, 2004
It's a great time to be a jazz singer in your 20s," Jane Monheit says, with the slightest hint of nervousness. The 26-year-old performer admits to being a little surprised by the explosion in vocal jazz over the last few years. When she began singing professionally in the late 1990s, Monheit was among a lonely handful of young artists attempting to further the grand tradition of Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan. Now, as the major labels strive to superserve those bewitched and bedazzled by Norah Jones, there are scores of fresh-faced stylists, each hoping to put his or her stamp on the Great American Songbook, each selling a different shade of saloon croonerismo, each determined to buff the standards until they're fabulous again.
NEWS
By Miriam Hill and Miriam Hill,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 2, 2003
NEW YORK - For a few sweet, sultry seconds recently, the notes of Louis Armstrong's gold-plated trumpet once again blew magically over working-class Queens. It was a sound that serenaded 107th Street for almost 30 years beginning in 1943, when Armstrong's wife, Lucille, bought the modest frame house where the jazz legend often played for neighborhood children, who called him "Pops." When the city of New York unveiled the house as a museum, the Gully Low Jazz Band, featuring clarinetest Joe Muranyi, who once played with Armstrong, transformed the street into a New Orleans-style party.
NEWS
December 11, 2002
Paul Vathis, 77, whose 56 years as an Associated Press photographer included a 1962 Pulitzer Prize for his picture of President Kennedy and former President Dwight D. Eisenhower walking together at Camp David after the Bay of Pigs invasion, died Tuesday in his sleep in Harrisburg, Pa. From the AP bureau in Harrisburg, where he spent most of his career, Mr. Vathis built a national reputation for his skill with a lens, his instinct for news and his boundless...
NEWS
February 2, 1996
Bob Thiele, 73, a producer and record company owner who recorded major jazz artists and pop stars such as Teresa Brewer, died Tuesday of kidney failure in New York.In the 1950s, he took over Coral Records and recorded work by Jackie Wilson, Buddy Holly and the Crickets, Buddy Hackett, Eydie Gorme, Steve Lawrence and others. He also recorded Pat Boone and the Mills Brothers for Dot Records, and an album of Jack Kerouac reading his poems.He started another company, Flying Dutchman, and recorded Count Basie, Louis Armstrong and Oliver Nelson.
FEATURES
By HARTFORD COURANT | March 31, 2003
Lyle Lovett is a musician, sure - one of the smartest and wittiest around, in fact - but he's also a music fan. He's a fan of the standards on his latest album, Smile, a collection of tunes he has recorded for various movies since 1992. It's telling that the word "fun" pops up a lot in a recent conversation with Lovett, who answers his cell phone somewhere near Santa Barbara, Calif., where he's driving himself to a gig. It's as if the Texas singer is still a little awed that he makes music for a living.
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