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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 8, 2005
A fight over loud music coming from a van on a Northwest Baltimore street sent four people to hospitals with stab wounds late Wednesday, city police said. A 16-year-old boy and three others, including his mother, were arguing with the driver of the van in the 4300 block of Fairview Ave. about 10 p.m. when several people came out of a nearby apartment building in defense of the driver, police said. As the argument continued, the boy, his 38-year-old mother, and two men, ages 18 and 35, were stabbed.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
From Liz Atwood: Silent Night. The beloved Christmas carol got me thinking recently that we just don't have enough silence anymore. Kids -- at least my kids -- seem especially addicted to noise. I walked into the family room recently to find the 16-year-old doing homework on his laptop while listening to music on his phone and watching a movie on the TV. The middle schooler usually plays games on his iPad while watching television. I'm constantly turning down the volume on the car radio and warning the kids they are going to hurt their ears if they listen to loud music through their earphones.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 21, 1993
The Anne Arundel County Council last night approved a bill that bans loud music or noise in residential neighborhoods, but gives a break to musicians.The bill was amended two weeks ago to meet the objections of instrumentalists and band parents."Without such an amendment . . . all outdoor concerts would be possibly illegal," Mary Ellen Cohn of the county public schools music office said last night, praising the council amendment. "Every parade within a community could be considered an illegal use of sound."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
Lawrence J. Thanner Jr. has lost a years-long battle with Baltimore County to have live music at his waterfront restaurant, but he says he'll take the fight to the Chesapeake Bay with a floating bandstand. "I'm preparing to bring a raft over soon," said Thanner, who owns the Dock of the Bay restaurant on Millers Island in the county's southeastern corner, which featured music outdoors this year and has been the subject of nuisance complaints from several neighbors. "I've got materials for it already.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
A dispute over loud music escalated into nearly fatal violence at an Essex apartment complex, county police said, leaving one man shot five times and another charged with attempted murder.Alvin Stewart Morgan, 26, of the 1600 block of Rickenbacker Road in the Village of Tall Trees apartment complex, was shot in the entryway Tuesday night, police said, after a confrontation about Morgan making too much noise.Charged with the shooting was James Herman Williams, 71, also of the 1600 block of Rickenbacker Road, according to police.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
More than 10 million Americans between ages 45 and 64 have some hearing loss, compared with 9 million-plus who are 65 or older. Repeated exposure to loud music, power equipment, motorcycles and industrial noise all contribute to high-frequency hearing loss. -- Hartford Courant
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
From Liz Atwood: Silent Night. The beloved Christmas carol got me thinking recently that we just don't have enough silence anymore. Kids -- at least my kids -- seem especially addicted to noise. I walked into the family room recently to find the 16-year-old doing homework on his laptop while listening to music on his phone and watching a movie on the TV. The middle schooler usually plays games on his iPad while watching television. I'm constantly turning down the volume on the car radio and warning the kids they are going to hurt their ears if they listen to loud music through their earphones.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ken Rosenthal contributed to this article | November 21, 1994
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -- Ever since the Baltimore CFLs arrived here Thursday, they had been under siege.Criticized in the local news media for everything from their etiquette to their choice of hotel, the CFLs had the last word yesterday.It belonged to Don Matthews."Let's blow this burg," the Baltimore coach said as players filed out of the locker room after a giddy 14-12 victory over the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. "You know what? Those other guys have to live here."When the CFLs awoke yesterday, they were greeted with a banner headline in the Winnipeg Free Press that said, "Baltimore ain't got no couth."
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
In 1967, Officer James N. Robey, a 26-year old rookie who had just quit his job at C. R. Daniels mill, became the first cop to patrol a barren place that someone wanted to build into a town called Columbia.He knew little about it, only that someday it was to be a sprawling suburban community. But during the first patrols on his new beat, the calls in the area were typical of the rest of the county: "Domestic arguments, drunks, loud music, bar fights and loose horses," he recalls."Little Patuxent Parkway was just a dirt road back then, and I think they were just beginning to build a few model homes," says Robey,50.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
Lawrence J. Thanner Jr. has lost a years-long battle with Baltimore County to have live music at his waterfront restaurant, but he says he'll take the fight to the Chesapeake Bay with a floating bandstand. "I'm preparing to bring a raft over soon," said Thanner, who owns the Dock of the Bay restaurant on Millers Island in the county's southeastern corner, which featured music outdoors this year and has been the subject of nuisance complaints from several neighbors. "I've got materials for it already.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 2, 2008
Food *** (3 stars) Service *** (3 stars) Atmosphere ** (2 stars) There are two kinds of people who shouldn't even consider eating at the new RA Sushi in Harbor East: Those who take their sushi seriously, and those who don't like really loud, throbbing rock 'n' roll music while they eat. In fact, if you fall into either of those two categories, don't even read any farther. That's how enraged this Arizona-based chain will make you. Poor:]
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 29, 2005
What are you willing to put up with in a restaurant for one of the best views in the Inner Harbor? That's the question you have to ask yourself before you eat at Lillies. Yes, I've been to this spot before. And you, faithful reader, have often been with me -- with reviews since 1990 of Catalina, South Harbor Tavern, J. Leonard's Waterside and, under the name Pier 500, three different restaurant concepts (New American, Southwestern and seafood, not necessarily in that order). I reviewed every one, although the review of the Southwestern concept never appeared in print, because by the time the photographer got there to take the picture, a month after the place opened, the chef had left and the concept had changed.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 8, 2005
A fight over loud music coming from a van on a Northwest Baltimore street sent four people to hospitals with stab wounds late Wednesday, city police said. A 16-year-old boy and three others, including his mother, were arguing with the driver of the van in the 4300 block of Fairview Ave. about 10 p.m. when several people came out of a nearby apartment building in defense of the driver, police said. As the argument continued, the boy, his 38-year-old mother, and two men, ages 18 and 35, were stabbed.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
More than 10 million Americans between ages 45 and 64 have some hearing loss, compared with 9 million-plus who are 65 or older. Repeated exposure to loud music, power equipment, motorcycles and industrial noise all contribute to high-frequency hearing loss. -- Hartford Courant
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 18, 2002
Less than a decade after George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess helped to blur the distinction between opera and musical - and provide an unprecedented opportunity for black singers - Oscar Hammerstein II's Carmen Jones did something along the same lines. But while the former opus is widely embraced as a masterpiece, the latter remains more of a curiosity, appreciated mostly by incurable Broadway fans. As part of a remarkable, $10 million, 10-year initiative funded by the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation for the Kennedy Center to produce "unique annual performances or collaborative efforts between artists," there was a starry, super-sized concert version of Carmen Jones over the weekend.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | June 23, 2002
When the families of Deer Season Run -- normally a quiet cul-de-sac in Columbia -- throw a block party, it's a lollapalooza. From its modest covered-dish beginnings six years ago, the annual event has grown into a daylong extravaganza that starts with a bike parade for the kids and continues on till dark with pony rides, games, a talent show, moon bounce, basketball tournament and, of course, food, food, food. The dishes range from Asian noodle casseroles to cupcakes decorated with Gummi Worms, and just about everything in between.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
"Coyote Ugly" is a testimony to the power of beautiful people, loud music and manipulative filmmaking - and if that's what you're looking for on a hot summer night, you can't do much better anywhere else. Unless, of course, you turned up the volume on your ZZ Top CD and bought the latest issue of Maxim magazine - which, coincidentally, features "The Girls of `Coyote Ugly' " on its cover and in a multi-page photo spread. Same basic effect. The story of a beautiful but shy singer-songwriter who supports herself by shaking her bared midriff at a rowdy New York bar, and becomes a better person thanks to the redemptive power of karaoke, "Coyote Ugly" doesn't display a single deep thought, or even a middlingly profound one. What it does display in abundance, and in all manner of skimpy costumes, is a wealth of beautiful folk - mostly ladies, but there is a token cute-as-can-be guy who takes off his shirt and dances on the bar - gyrating to loud music, speaking in cute little catchphrases and just generally having the rowdy good time of their lives.
NEWS
By David Grimes | April 11, 2000
IF YOU LIKE to listen to loud music in your car, you may want to avoid the town of Alexandria, La. Unless you like country music. I mean, really like it. According to an Associated Press story, Henry Nelson, 20, and Jon Driggers, 26, pleaded guilty to violating Rapides Parish's ordinance prohibiting "loud and offensive noise" after cranking up the volume too high on their car stereo. They were fined, given a suspended jail sentence and probation, and ordered to attend a "music appreciation" session where they would spend three hours listening to their least-favorite kind of music -- country.
FEATURES
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2002
When Dick Dale answers the phone late-morning in a hotel on the road to somewhere that will eventually bring him to Towson's Recher Theatre on Wednesday, he yawns. Repeatedly. "Did I wake you?" I ask him, a little unnerved already about tracking down the renowned guitar player on his cell phone at the last minute to play 100 questions. He mutters something about "being up, being down," then asks, "Where the hell am I right now?" In 38 days, the 65-year-old Dale will have played 32 shows, three of them in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Football has the crunching sound that goes with a hard tackle. In baseball, it's the crack of the bat on a homer. Ice hockey has the ping of a slap shot off the post. Professional indoor soccer? Often, it's loud music that can drown out the sounds of the game. The Major Indoor Soccer League has guidelines as to when music is supposed to be played and for how long. During the flow of a game, the policy is to have only instrumental music played with a limit of 30 seconds on to every one minute off, but that's not always adhered to in some venues.
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