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By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Maryland's new U.S. attorney said at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday that he does not intend to seek the post permanently, keeping open the contest to become the state's next top federal prosecutor. Allen F. Loucks was ushered in yesterday morning to replace Thomas M. DiBiagio, who announced his resignation last month. Loucks, who has worked in the office for 10 years, said it was common to have a placeholder fill the job while awaiting a permanent U.S. attorney appointed by the president.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
Archbishop Spalding's emotional football season will continue, thanks to its defensive stand against Loyola in overtime and a 1-yard scoring sneak by quarterback Brian Louck. Louck's touchdown gave the No. 9 Cavaliers a 20-14 victory over the visiting Dons Friday night and clinched a berth for them and coach Mike Whittles, who is battling pancreatic cancer, in the first Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference playoffs. "We did it for this big guy right here," Louck said reaching for Whittles.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
Josh Loucks says he doesn't know why Sommer Loren Brooks, the 22-year-old Randallstown woman accused of killing her mother, chose to tell him about the gruesome bludgeoning. But Loucks says Brooks told him in chilling detail how she wrestled with her mother, tied her up and abused her Sunday night before she beat her to death Monday. Baltimore County police discovered the body of Linda Carol Brooks, a 52-year-old state worker, on Monday night. She had been beaten with an ax and maul and died of severe head trauma, police said.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Eric Siegel and Matthew Dolan and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
Eighteen months after launching a wide-ranging public corruption investigation into the financial practices of the Baltimore City Council, federal prosecutors dropped their criminal probe yesterday without charging anyone. "Our office is charged with considering credible information concerning potential crimes," Maryland's interim U.S. Attorney Allen F. Loucks said yesterday. "As a result of such, we have investigated various practices of the Baltimore City Council and concluded that the evidence available to date does not support a successful prosecution."
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Stephanie Hanes and Matthew Dolan and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2005
Federal prosecutor Allen F. Loucks is scheduled to be sworn in Monday as interim Maryland U.S. attorney, replacing Thomas M. DiBiagio. Prosecutors in the office received an e-mail this week announcing the temporary appointment, which will last 120 days or until the president appoints a permanent U.S. attorney. Loucks, 47, heads the Maryland U.S. attorney's civil division, which prosecutes civil fraud matters and represents the government when it is sued. Reached by telephone at home last night, Loucks confirmed the appointment but declined to comment.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
Baltimore County police yesterday said officers acted appropriately Sunday night when they checked on a report of a woman calling for help in a Randallstown-area neighborhood where a 52-year-old state worker was later found bludgeoned to death. But neighbors say they don't think officers did enough to prevent the killing of Linda Carol Brooks, whose body was discovered Monday night in her home. The officers didn't knock on anyone's door, they said, or search the area after a neighbor called police Sunday night and said she could hear a woman yelling, "Help me!
NEWS
By George Taylor | July 21, 1991
Driving ranges are not what they used to be, and the golfing world is better off for it.Some of the worst images were created back inthe dark ages of driving ranges. Included were scenes of Saturday night joy riders stopping at the range long enough to clown on the teesbefore giggling girlfriends.The loud and distracting performances sent serious golfers ducking for safety.Balls issued to early range customers looked more like walnuts, teeing areas were made of dust and gravel, and if you dared to use one of the "house" clubs the head might fall off with the first solid drive.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Eric Siegel and Matthew Dolan and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
Eighteen months after launching a wide-ranging public corruption investigation into the financial practices of the Baltimore City Council, federal prosecutors dropped their criminal probe yesterday without charging anyone. "Our office is charged with considering credible information concerning potential crimes," Maryland's interim U.S. Attorney Allen F. Loucks said yesterday. "As a result of such, we have investigated various practices of the Baltimore City Council and concluded that the evidence available to date does not support a successful prosecution."
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
Archbishop Spalding's emotional football season will continue, thanks to its defensive stand against Loyola in overtime and a 1-yard scoring sneak by quarterback Brian Louck. Louck's touchdown gave the No. 9 Cavaliers a 20-14 victory over the visiting Dons Friday night and clinched a berth for them and coach Mike Whittles, who is battling pancreatic cancer, in the first Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference playoffs. "We did it for this big guy right here," Louck said reaching for Whittles.
NEWS
January 5, 2006
On January 2, 2006, JEANNE L. ENTWISTLE (nee Luyster); beloved wife of John G. Entwistle; loving mother of Judith A. Meerdter (Michael), Robert J. Entwistle (Gail), Eileen P. Loucks (George Bond) and Susan J. Brown (C. Hammond, Jr.); cherished grandmother of Diane M. and Susan E. Spencer, Joshua M. Loucks, Steven M. Meerdter, C. Hammond III and Daniel R. Brown, Jaesen R. Entwistle and Samantha J. Brown. Also survived by four great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road)
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Maryland's new U.S. attorney said at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday that he does not intend to seek the post permanently, keeping open the contest to become the state's next top federal prosecutor. Allen F. Loucks was ushered in yesterday morning to replace Thomas M. DiBiagio, who announced his resignation last month. Loucks, who has worked in the office for 10 years, said it was common to have a placeholder fill the job while awaiting a permanent U.S. attorney appointed by the president.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Stephanie Hanes and Matthew Dolan and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2005
Federal prosecutor Allen F. Loucks is scheduled to be sworn in Monday as interim Maryland U.S. attorney, replacing Thomas M. DiBiagio. Prosecutors in the office received an e-mail this week announcing the temporary appointment, which will last 120 days or until the president appoints a permanent U.S. attorney. Loucks, 47, heads the Maryland U.S. attorney's civil division, which prosecutes civil fraud matters and represents the government when it is sued. Reached by telephone at home last night, Loucks confirmed the appointment but declined to comment.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
Josh Loucks says he doesn't know why Sommer Loren Brooks, the 22-year-old Randallstown woman accused of killing her mother, chose to tell him about the gruesome bludgeoning. But Loucks says Brooks told him in chilling detail how she wrestled with her mother, tied her up and abused her Sunday night before she beat her to death Monday. Baltimore County police discovered the body of Linda Carol Brooks, a 52-year-old state worker, on Monday night. She had been beaten with an ax and maul and died of severe head trauma, police said.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
Baltimore County police yesterday said officers acted appropriately Sunday night when they checked on a report of a woman calling for help in a Randallstown-area neighborhood where a 52-year-old state worker was later found bludgeoned to death. But neighbors say they don't think officers did enough to prevent the killing of Linda Carol Brooks, whose body was discovered Monday night in her home. The officers didn't knock on anyone's door, they said, or search the area after a neighbor called police Sunday night and said she could hear a woman yelling, "Help me!
NEWS
By George Taylor | July 21, 1991
Driving ranges are not what they used to be, and the golfing world is better off for it.Some of the worst images were created back inthe dark ages of driving ranges. Included were scenes of Saturday night joy riders stopping at the range long enough to clown on the teesbefore giggling girlfriends.The loud and distracting performances sent serious golfers ducking for safety.Balls issued to early range customers looked more like walnuts, teeing areas were made of dust and gravel, and if you dared to use one of the "house" clubs the head might fall off with the first solid drive.
NEWS
May 27, 2004
On May 22, 2004 BRIAN MATTHEW, beloved son of Stephanie Johnson, loving father of Madison Elizabeth Johnson, devoted brother of William H. Johnson, III, Christine Loucks and Angela Green, beloved fiance of Angela Harris. Also survived by many nieces and nephews and a host of relatives A memorial service will be held on Saturday, May 29 at 3 P.M. at the Daugherty Family Funeral Home and Cremation Center, P.A., 2601 Mountain Rd. in Pasadena.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
An owner of a popular city restaurant and a man who brandished a handgun in a DVD that threatened informers with death were among 13 people indicted yesterday for their alleged roles in a violent Northwest Baltimore drug gang. A federal grand jury handed up the 20-count indictment. It charges that from 1995 to 2004, the gang, known as the Rice Organization, distributed 1,500 kilograms of cocaine and heroin. The indictment seeks forfeiture of $27 million in criminal proceeds in addition to houses and luxury vehicles.
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