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Lou Gehrig

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NEWS
September 12, 1995
Of all the CALebrations last week, none was more touching than the creation of a Cal Ripken Jr./Lou Gehrig Fund to finance research at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions on the degenerate nerve disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, that killed the legendary Yankee player more than half a century ago. The Orioles under owner Peter Angelos conceived the plan to sell 260 field-level seats at $5,000 apiece to raise $1.3 million. Then the baseball club promised to kick in another $700,000 to push the fund to the $2 million mark.
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SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
A new series on MLB Network, "My Most Memorable Game," debuts tonight at 9 p.m. with Orioles Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. talking about a notable game from his career. Anyone want to guess which one he'll be discussing? OK, so it's not surprising that the Iron Man will talk about the game against the California Angels on Sept. 6, 1995 at Camden Yards -- the night he broke Lou Gehrig's record by playing in his 2,131st straight game. But it should still be an interesting show for Orioles fans.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. William H. Natcher is the Lou Gehrig of Congress -- and there's no Cal Ripken in sight. The congressman's iron-man streak of 18,397 straight House votes began in 1953 and has never been equaled.But the 84-year-old Kentucky Democrat was granted a favor by his colleagues yesterday that Mr. Ripken will never get: Play was suspended because Mr. Natcher was too ill to take the field.In a gesture so extraordinary that Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington could not recall anything like it happening before, the House granted Mr. Natcher's request to postpone yesterday's scheduled votes so that the hospitalized congressman could undergo medical treatment for what he called an "intestinal problem."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Dudley Clendinen relished nothing more than telling a great story — even the story of his impending death. A journalist and author who wrote for The New York Times and had once served as an editor for The Baltimore Sun, Mr. Clendinen died Wednesday at Baltimore's Joseph Richey House hospice of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He was 67. He chronicled his 18-month struggle with the condition commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease on Baltimore public radio station WYPR in a series titled "Living with Lou: Dudley Clendinen on a Good, Short Life.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 29, 1991
Now the destiny that links Cal Ripken Jr. and the man he is pursuing in the record book, Lou Gehrig, is being perceived on more of a personal basis. But Ripken quickly admits to knowing little about Gehrig, who set the standard for longevity by playing 2,130 consecutive games.Ripken is at 1,573 and counting. It's second highest in the annals of major-league baseball as he mounts the strongest challenge yet to what was considered an unapproachable goal. "All I can tell you is what I remember as a kid when I watched the movie of Gehrig's life on television," says the Baltimore Orioles shortstop.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 4, 1993
In a lustrous finale to one of the most fervid hunts in biology, scientists have discovered the gene behind Lou Gehrig's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that results in muscle wasting, paralysis and death.And, although identifying the gene for an illness is usually just the first step in learning how it works and what happens when it goes awry, in this case the long-sought quarry turns out to be one of the most familiar genes. This familiarity means that potential therapies for the disease may be much closer at hand than had been expected.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
When veterinarian Peter F. Radue first saw her, the 12-year-old appaloosa was trembling violently in her stall.The horse was clearly uncomfortable. Yet she seemed bright and alert, with a good appetite."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2008
The Department of Veterans Affairs plans to provide full disability payments for Lou Gehrig's disease, tacitly acknowledging for the first time a generalized link between the fatal neurological disorder and military service. Veterans and patient advocates have advocated the change for years, citing studies showing that former soldiers are more likely than the general population to contract the disease, formally known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The VA already extends full compensation to ALS-stricken veterans of the first Persian Gulf war, who, according to a study earlier this decade, are twice as likely as other service members to contract the disease.
NEWS
By David Steele and David Steele,david.steele@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The person considered the strongest Raven by coach John Harbaugh received the game ball after Saturday's AFC divisional playoff victory over the Tennessee Titans in Nashville, even though he didn't take a snap or put on a uniform. In the victorious locker room at LP Field, Pro Bowl safety Ed Reed handed the ball to O.J. Brigance, the Ravens' director of player development, saying, "This is for you." Brigance expressed thanks from the motorized wheelchair that he uses as he battles Lou Gehrig's disease, then added, "but we've got two more to play."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Dudley Clendinen relished nothing more than telling a great story — even the story of his impending death. A journalist and author who wrote for The New York Times and had once served as an editor for The Baltimore Sun, Mr. Clendinen died Wednesday at Baltimore's Joseph Richey House hospice of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He was 67. He chronicled his 18-month struggle with the condition commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease on Baltimore public radio station WYPR in a series titled "Living with Lou: Dudley Clendinen on a Good, Short Life.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Sixty miles east of Babe Ruth's birthplace, in the drowsy town of Sudlersville (population 497), stands a statue of the other great slugger from Maryland's past. But you'll have to stop at the town's only red light, corner of Church and Main, to view the life-size likeness of Jimmie Foxx at roadside. From his follow-through swing to the look on his face, it's clear that the bronzed Foxx has just done what he did 534 times in his 20-year career - he knocked one out of the park. That lusty swing landed the Queen Anne's County farmboy in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | April 20, 2011
Writer Dudley Clendinen is a gifted raconteur, weaving his stories in a soft Southern accent and with a courtly manner. It is easy to imagine him captivating dinner guests until long after the candles have burned down. It is a savage irony, then, that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is taking his voice first when it might have chosen his limbs instead. It was slurred speech that gave Clendinen, 66, the first hint of trouble. A former national reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times who also worked for The Baltimore Sun, he had settled here to write books and teach.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Johns Hopkins recently cleared the $200 million mark in grants received as part of federal stimulus spending, demonstrating that not even a deep recession could choke the university's ability to attract research money. The Johns Hopkins University recently cleared the $200 million mark in grants received as part of federal stimulus spending, demonstrating that not even a deep recession could choke its ability to attract research money. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act gave $12.4 billion to the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation for grants to be distributed between February 2009 and September 2010.
NEWS
By Jerry Dincin | June 7, 2010
Baltimore physician Dr. Larry Egbert is currently awaiting trial in both Arizona and Georgia, accused of assisted suicide. The charges are unfounded. Dr. Egbert, a former Johns Hopkins professor, simply counseled patients with incurable diseases about their options as the end of their lives drew near. By talking to these folks, Dr. Egbert was fulfilling his responsibility as a medical professional. To understand why, consider the plight of those suffering from Alzheimer's.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
It's the most recognizable digit in Baltimore. Authorities said that didn't dissuade four young men from ripping Cal Ripken Jr.'s 3 1/2 -foot-tall aluminum number 8 off its base in front of Camden Yards Tuesday night, throwing it into the back of a gray pickup truck and parading it through the city. The men, described in a police report as juiced up on alcohol, apparently got rowdy while stopped on the east side of Patterson Park, and someone called the police to complain. By then, Maryland Stadium Authority guards had flagged down passing police outside the ballpark, and detectives had reviewed a surveillance video showing four young men "pulling and kicking" the sculpture.
NEWS
By joe and teresa graedon | August 31, 2009
Question: : My husband started on lovastatin for high cholesterol and soon began to notice weakness in his right arm. This weakness progressed, so he saw his doctor, thinking he had a pinched nerve. He was referred to a neurologist, who gave him a diagnosis of "possible ALS." On his 60th birthday, a second opinion confirmed the diagnosis of ALS. Since that time, my husband has progressed from weakness in his right arm to complete loss of function in his arms, very weak leg muscles and difficulty breathing.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | April 20, 2011
Writer Dudley Clendinen is a gifted raconteur, weaving his stories in a soft Southern accent and with a courtly manner. It is easy to imagine him captivating dinner guests until long after the candles have burned down. It is a savage irony, then, that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is taking his voice first when it might have chosen his limbs instead. It was slurred speech that gave Clendinen, 66, the first hint of trouble. A former national reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times who also worked for The Baltimore Sun, he had settled here to write books and teach.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1995
In 1938, Lou Gehrig was diagnosed with the degenerative nerve disease ALS. He would lose his capacity to walk, talk and swallow. He would die choking as the disease followed its normal, horrific course.His physicians could scarcely imagine what caused it.Now, researchers speak of progress - hints that they can slow the disease's destruction. They do not, however, speak of cures.Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, causes the atrophy and death of specialized nerve cells in the spinal cord that control virtually all the muscles that enable us to move.
NEWS
By David Steele and David Steele,david.steele@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The person considered the strongest Raven by coach John Harbaugh received the game ball after Saturday's AFC divisional playoff victory over the Tennessee Titans in Nashville, even though he didn't take a snap or put on a uniform. In the victorious locker room at LP Field, Pro Bowl safety Ed Reed handed the ball to O.J. Brigance, the Ravens' director of player development, saying, "This is for you." Brigance expressed thanks from the motorized wheelchair that he uses as he battles Lou Gehrig's disease, then added, "but we've got two more to play."
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