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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Maryland has become the third state to offer a voluntary system to restrict the ability to play the lottery, officials announced Tuesday. The program is an expansion of the casino exclusion program launched in 2011, several months after Maryland's first casino opened. People on that list agree to be cited for trespassing if found in one of the state's casinos. Once signed up for the lottery exclusion list, a person is required to forfeit any lottery prize winnings — including from scratch-off tickets — to the Maryland Problem Gambling Fund.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Millions of dollars in winning Mega Millions tickets remain unclaimed while a $1 million ticket in Saturday's Powerball drawing was sold in Glen Burnie, a state Lottery spokeswoman said. While no one matched all numbers needed to hit the Powerball, a winning $1 million ticket was sold at JJ's Tavern in the 1000 block of 1st St. in Glen Burnie, Lottery officials announced on Sunday. Four other $1 million tickets were also purchased elsewhere in the country. The winning numbers were 13, 28, 31, 55 and 58. The Powerball was 15. Maryland lottery officials indicated on Twitter on Sunday that the state's winner had not yet come forward.
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NEWS
September 28, 1993
"I waited a whole week," said Gov. William Donald Schaefer, "for somebody to rush in with a new source of revenue, and there was no one who rushed to me and said, 'I can figure out a way to get you the 10 or 15 million.' " That's why he voted to approve the purchase of 300 vending machines that dispense $1 and $2 scratch-off lottery tickets.It is a lame excuse, but the same one Mr. Schaefer used previously to explain other efforts to implement new games of chance in Maryland: The state needs the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
When the national touring production of "The Book of Mormon" hits Baltimore later this month as part of the Broadway Across America series at the Hippodrome, the multiple Tony Award-winning musical will bring a bargain ticket offer with it. There will be a lottery drawing for $25 tickets before each performance during the run, Feb. 25 to March 9. This practice, a popular feature of the show on Broadway (there the lottery tickets are $32), has been adopted on the tour as well, attracting hundreds of participants at some stops.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | July 24, 1991
If the lottery ticket you buy today looks different from the one you bought yesterday, you're seeing the results of a $65 million contract for new technology designed to give you more ways to play.The new lottery computer system, designed by GTECH Corp., officially goes on line today after a bitter, politically tinged lobbying campaign that unseated longtime lottery vendor Control Data Corp.The changeover began June 27 when a handful of new ticket machines went on line from Maryland to GTECH's West Greenwich, R.I., headquarters on a test basis.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff Thomas W. Waldron and Jon Morgan contributed to this story | March 12, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is considering several options for weathering Baltimore's fiscal crisis, including seeking a 10-cent surcharge on state lottery tickets and reducing the city's $39 million-a-year contribution to the city employee retirement systems.The city faces a $16.1 million budget gap for the fiscal year that begins in July.Schmoke is proposing that a dime be added to the price of lottery tickets sold in the city for one year. The added revenue from the lottery surcharge, estimated at $19 million, would be used for law enforcement.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | March 12, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, feeling political heat from a rising homicide rate and a wave of armed robberies, proposed yesterday a 10-cent surcharge on lottery tickets sold in Baltimore to raise money to upgrade the Police Department's crime-fighting ability."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | March 18, 1991
While the view from Maryland's treasury building may be gloomy in almost every other direction, the skies over the state Lottery Agency are sunny.Lottery officials reported today that sales of lottery tickets were up more than $19.5 million through the first seven months of the 1991 fiscal year, a jump of 4.3 percent.After prize winners, lottery agents and employees take their cut, the state can claim almost $6.3 million in added revenues, an increase of 3.3 percent.Lottery spokesman Carroll H. Hynson Jr. said Marylanders are buying more lottery tickets, despite the recession, because "it's a form of recreation."
NEWS
October 12, 1990
A Baltimore man was sentenced to serve two years in prison yesterday after he pleaded guilty to stealing and cashing two winning lottery tickets worth $7,500.Eric Williams, 26, of the 4800 block of Gilray Drive had been charged in August with setting up the scheme to steal winning lottery tickets with the help of a Maryland State Lottery Agency employee, according to the state attorney general's office.Baltimore Circuit Judge Elsbeth Levy Bothe sentenced Williams to five years in prison, with three years suspended, and required him to pay back the $7,500.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1996
A major convenience store chain has stopped selling Maryland lottery tickets, but officials don't expect the decision to have much impact on state revenue.Wawa food stores discontinued lottery sales in Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania on Friday. The 496-store chain, which is based in suburban Philadelphia, sold tickets in 62 stores, including 17 in Maryland.Lori Bruce, a Wawa spokeswoman, said company officials wanted outlets to put greater emphasis on food sales and quicker transactions.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
A $1 million, second-tier Mega Millions ticket has been sold at a 7-Eleven in Clinton, said Maryland Lottery officials on Wednesday morning. Maryland Lottery spokeswoman Carole Everett said that the winning ticket was a manual pick, meaning that the purchaser chose the numbers. The winning numbers were 4, 23, 30, 43, 50 and 11 (Mega Ball). Everett added that the winning ticket came on the last draw of a 15-draw advanced purchase. The ticket was purchased on Aug. 27, and the winner now has 182 days to claim the prize, Everett said.
NEWS
Staff Reports | August 20, 2013
The office of the Maryland Attorney General said Tuesday a former Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency employee pleaded guilty to theft after allegedly stealing thousands of lottery tickets and cashing in winners for $67,000. Mark Barron Hantske, 59, of Lothian, pleaded guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to two counts of felony theft over $10,000. Prosecutors say between June 2008 and February 2012, while employed as a lottery sales representative, Hantske stole more than 7,500 scratch-off tickets from nine retailers.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
As lottery promoters will tell you, you have to play to win. But when it comes to playing with other people's money, experts have another saying to keep in mind: Trust but verify. After a rash of high-profile lawsuits alleging lottery-ticket fraud among groups of coworkers, some fun-loving players are getting serious about the precautions they take to ensure fair play when it comes to pooling ticket money with colleagues. And some in the human-resources field say workplace pools should be banned outright.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Maryland has become the third state to offer a voluntary system to restrict the ability to play the lottery, officials announced Tuesday. The program is an expansion of the casino exclusion program launched in 2011, several months after Maryland's first casino opened. People on that list agree to be cited for trespassing if found in one of the state's casinos. Once signed up for the lottery exclusion list, a person is required to forfeit any lottery prize winnings — including from scratch-off tickets — to the Maryland Problem Gambling Fund.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
The public fascination with who won the record $587.5 million Powerball jackpot turned to Maryland on Friday, as reports surfaced that a customer at an Upper Marlboro gas station claimed he had the coveted winning ticket. Negassi Ghebre, acting manager of the Marlboro Village Exxon, said he was manning the cash register when the man walked in Thursday afternoon to check lottery tickets he had bought. "We gave him the winning numbers, then he matched them," Ghebre said. "He realized that he's the winner.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones | September 26, 2012
Nicholas Ruth's lottery ticket held the winning numbers for a Mega Millions second-tier prize — $250,000 — and he didn't even know it. The Towson resident bought a ticket was at 7-Eleven, on Loch Raven Boulevard, and didn't check his numbers until late Saturday night. Even then, he wasn't sure. "I checked it about eight times before I realized all the numbers matched," Ruth said. "My mom checked it another 15 times. We got all excited and started jumping up and down. " He then called his brother at 1:30 a.m. The Archbishop Curley High graduate started buying lottery tickets every Tuesday and Friday when he turned 18. Winning was never a possibility, he thought, but it was the idea that kept him hooked.
NEWS
By JACQUE KELLY | July 30, 1993
A line of people forming to buy lottery tickets is nothing new in Maryland.The tradition of putting down a few dollars in hopes of walking away with a bankroll has been around as long as Maryland.A new exhibition at the library of the Maryland Historical Society shows how lottery tickets were used in the 18th and 19th centuries to finance higher education, pave roads and build churches.Many neighboring states frowned on Maryland's penchant for gambling, but that never stopped people in these parts from trying to get on Dame Fortune's good side.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
As lottery promoters will tell you, you have to play to win. But when it comes to playing with other people's money, experts have another saying to keep in mind: Trust but verify. After a rash of high-profile lawsuits alleging lottery-ticket fraud among groups of coworkers, some fun-loving players are getting serious about the precautions they take to ensure fair play when it comes to pooling ticket money with colleagues. And some in the human-resources field say workplace pools should be banned outright.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
Despite a sluggish economy that has many consumers pinching pennies, Marylanders are still willing to pony up a buck for a chance to win big. For the 15th consecutive year, the Maryland Lottery reported an increase in ticket sales, pumping more money than ever into the state treasury. Maryland sold $1.795 billion in lottery tickets during fiscal 2012 — $80.4 million more than the prior year, the state lottery agency announced Monday. The lottery contributed $556 million to the state's operations, 7 percent more than last year, and was the state's fourth-largest source of revenue, after sales, income and corporate taxes.
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