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NEWS
By John Frece and John Frece,Annapolis Bureau | March 11, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- For the first time in a long time, the state got some modestly good economic news today.Gov. William Donald Schaefer was told that a new agreement with the federal government will bring in enough federal Medicaid funds to offset most of a continuing decline in sales tax and lottery revenues. The Medicaid money, the state's Board of Revenue Estimates said, will not be enough to prevent another $7 million drop in revenue estimates for this fiscal year, but it is expected to produce a net $13 million revenue increase for the fiscal year that begins July 1.The announcement marked the first time since December 1989 that the governor has been handed a prediction that revenues might actually be going up.There are other signs that the economy may be on the verge of the long-awaited recovery, said Marvin Bond, a spokesman for state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein.
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NEWS
July 25, 2012
If, as The Sun reported, the Maryland Lottery has pumped more money than ever into the state treasury for an increase of 7 percent from 2011 to 2012, why then do our greedy governor,Martin O'Malley, and his Democratic, thieving cohorts find the need to raise taxes and fees on a non-stop basis ("A good year for Md. Lottery," July 24)? I'll tell you why. Because Mr. O'Malley and "friends" are all Democrats who have never seen a tax or fee that they didn't love, and they can always find a new and exciting way to waste our money!
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NEWS
December 20, 1991
The General Assembly hasn't distinguished itself for courage in tackling hard issues in recent years, so it is not surprising that a number of lawmakers are touting video lotteries as "an easy way" of increasing state revenue. But if there's one thing states should have learned about lotteries, it is that they are not a steady source of easy money over the long haul.For the first four months of this fiscal year, lottery profits were up 6 percent over last year -- one of the few bits of good budget news the state has had recently.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
Maryland Lottery officials are gambling that Ravens football fever will bolster ticket sales when a new scratch-off is unveiled later this year, marking one of the first partnerships of its kind in the country. Under the $810,000 deal with the Ravens approved by the state Board of Public Works on Wednesday, the team's logo will appear on $5 purple scratch-off tickets starting during the preseason in August. Prizes include lifetime season tickets to Ravens games, up to $1 million in cash and game-day suites.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | January 30, 1995
Several Baltimore-area lawmakers, seeking to preserve funding for a downtown football stadium, are preparing legislation to maintain money already set aside for the project but free up future revenue for other purposes.The bill would retain the $24.3 million expected to be in the "football reserve fund" at the end of the fiscal year, but would allow future stadium lottery revenues of about $19 million a year not needed for debt service or operating expenses on Oriole Park to be diverted to non-recurring, capital projects.
SPORTS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 23, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Any horse-racing fan with dreams of placing bets at off-track parlors in Maryland is advised to forget those notions this year. The Senate's leadership said yesterday it will not consider any OTB legislation in 1991.The senators said they were concerned about a possible threat to state lottery revenues, the financial problems of harness-track owner Mark Vogel, the organization of the OTB system and the simple lack of votes in favor of OTB."There's a consensus, I think, among all senators that 1991 is not the year for this issue to be discussed," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
A rebounding Maryland Lottery plans to increase payouts this year and is "very likely" to begin offering "millionaire" winners of its flagship Lotto game the option of collecting their prizes in a lump sum, its director said yesterday.Buddy Roogow, who became director in October when lottery sales were in a deep slump, told the Senate Finance Committee in Annapolis that revenues for the fiscal year would comfortably exceed the state's estimate of $334 million.He also outlined a series of ambitious plans to increase the appeal of the state-run numbers games, including a possible move away from the system under which winners of big Lotto prizes collect their winnings in the form of 20-year annuities.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
Maryland Lottery officials are gambling that Ravens football fever will bolster ticket sales when a new scratch-off is unveiled later this year, marking one of the first partnerships of its kind in the country. Under the $810,000 deal with the Ravens approved by the state Board of Public Works on Wednesday, the team's logo will appear on $5 purple scratch-off tickets starting during the preseason in August. Prizes include lifetime season tickets to Ravens games, up to $1 million in cash and game-day suites.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | December 18, 1993
Economic trend lines are up, the Christmas buying season is expected to be big, and housing sales are on the rise, state tax collector Louis L. Goldstein said yesterday as he delivered Maryland's most upbeat economic prediction in about four years."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer fired William F. Rochford as director of the State Lottery Agency yesterday, five days after he alleged that the governor ordered him to inflate revenue estimates for the agency's keno game last year.Paul E. Schurick, the governor's chief of staff, informed the lottery director at a private meeting in Baltimore that he was being let go. Mr. Rochford, 68, a longtime friend and appointee of Mr. Schaefer's, headed the state agency for nearly seven years, of which the last two years were rocky.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | September 2, 2003
IN THE MORNING, Millie Slechta said no for the third time. No, no, and no again. The people in charge at Aberdeen Middle School called her on the telephone, and they asked if she would please come in to teach English and science, but Millie said she had other important plans. She is 76 years old, and she stood in line now with a cane to help her with the day's long walk, and her mind was made up. The line proceeded to a machine where a woman handled bets for the Maryland Lottery game, and another for the Keno game.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Having studied how fast and far the horses have bolted from the barn, the National Gambling Impact Study Commission's report suggests tinkering with the wide-open barn door. The report is a reminder, as the post-Littleton culture wars rage, that legislating to regulate cultural change is like lassoing a locomotive with a cobweb.Last year, Americans spent about $7 billion on movie tickets, $26 billion on books of all sorts, $450 billion on groceries. Gamblers in America wagered more than $630 billion legally in state lotteries, casinos, slot machines, video poker and keno, etc. -- and lost $50 billion in the process.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1997
The state's study commission on the horse-racing industry will recommend that the state grant the industry $10 million from the lottery next year -- up from $5 million this year.At a meeting yesterday in Annapolis, the commission also agreed to recommend that the governor and legislature approve other measures to assist the industry in its competitive struggle against racetracks with slot machines in neighboring states.Although Gov. Parris N. Glendening had declared slot machines off the table for this study commission, the sticky subject never completely disappeared.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
A rebounding Maryland Lottery plans to increase payouts this year and is "very likely" to begin offering "millionaire" winners of its flagship Lotto game the option of collecting their prizes in a lump sum, its director said yesterday.Buddy Roogow, who became director in October when lottery sales were in a deep slump, told the Senate Finance Committee in Annapolis that revenues for the fiscal year would comfortably exceed the state's estimate of $334 million.He also outlined a series of ambitious plans to increase the appeal of the state-run numbers games, including a possible move away from the system under which winners of big Lotto prizes collect their winnings in the form of 20-year annuities.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
Dissatisfied with last week's proposed settlement addressing funding and management of Baltimore public schools, a city parents group called yesterday for a boycott of the Maryland Lottery on Nov. 27 to protest the agreement reached by state and city officials.Organizers of the Save Our Children Coalition argue that a portion of the revenues from the state lottery should go toward education funding and are asking all Baltimore residents not to buy lottery tickets on the day they have designated as "Black Wednesday."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
Maryland Lottery sales have dropped $24.4 million -- or 9 percent -- since July 1, a decline that could pose budget problems for the state next year if it persists.The drop comes at a time when the state is counting on lottery revenues to balance its budget and provide funds to build a National Football League stadium in Baltimore.Lottery officials are concerned but "somewhat" optimistic they can halt the current sales trend. "We have great concern, but it is not totally impossible to turn it around," said lottery spokesman Carroll H. Hynson Jr.Hynson attributed the sales decline to rainy weather, lower game jackpots and a deliberate slowdown in advertising and promotions over the summer while the state switched to a new lottery computer system and contractor.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
Maryland Lottery sales have dropped $24.4 million -- or 9 percent -- since July 1, a decline that could pose budget problems for the state next year if it persists.The drop comes at a time when the state is counting on lottery revenues to balance its budget and provide funds to build a National Football League stadium in Baltimore.Lottery officials are concerned but "somewhat" optimistic they can halt the current sales trend. "We have great concern, but it is not totally impossible to turn it around," said lottery spokesman Carroll H. Hynson Jr.Hynson attributed the sales decline to rainy weather, lower game jackpots and a deliberate slowdown in advertising and promotions over the summer while the state switched to a new lottery computer system and contractor.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
One approval down. One to go.Over the continued objections of Republican state legislators, Maryland's Democratic-controlled Board of Public Works yesterday gave swift and unanimous approval to a deal with the Cleveland Browns to build the team a $200 million, 70,000-seat football stadium in downtown Baltimore.If NFL owners approve the move when they meet in January -- and barring any successful legal challenges -- the Cleveland Browns will become the Baltimore Browns and the first spade of earth for the new stadium could be turned as early as March.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
One approval down. One to go.Over the continued objections of Republican state legislators, Maryland's Democratic-controlled Board of Public Works yesterday gave swift and unanimous approval to a deal with the Cleveland Browns to build the team a $200 million, 70,000-seat football stadium in downtown Baltimore.If NFL owners approve the move when they meet in January -- and barring any successful legal challenges -- the Cleveland Browns will become the Baltimore Browns and the first spade of earth for the new stadium could be turned as early as March.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | January 30, 1995
Several Baltimore-area lawmakers, seeking to preserve funding for a downtown football stadium, are preparing legislation to maintain money already set aside for the project but free up future revenue for other purposes.The bill would retain the $24.3 million expected to be in the "football reserve fund" at the end of the fiscal year, but would allow future stadium lottery revenues of about $19 million a year not needed for debt service or operating expenses on Oriole Park to be diverted to non-recurring, capital projects.
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