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By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
The Maryland attorney general has decided that Keno and other state lottery games can be tapped to finance a new Baltimore football stadium, not just the scratch-off games that helped build Oriole Park at Camden Yards.The opinion issued yesterday by Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. ensures that enough lottery money will be available to finance the $200 million stadium planned for the Cleveland Browns.But the decision could give ammunition to stadium opponents who have complained that lottery revenue should be used for state programs they consider more vital, such as education.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | November 29, 2012
Charrlene Cebrianwarned her boss at Steve's Lunch in Cross Street Market on Wednesday that she might not come into work for her next shift. The Powerball player was just one of millions who hoped the 11 p.m. drawing would bring them the $588 million jackpot. Though the odds of winning were astronomical - one in more than 175 million - the money convinced many to join in. The hefty jackpot jumped almost $200 million Wednesday with the increase in sales as more players bought the small sheets of paper bearing what they hoped would be the winning numbers, which turned out to be 05 16 22 23 29 with a Powerball of 06. Winning tickets were purchased in Arizona and Missouri, according to the Multi-State Lottery Association.
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NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | November 19, 1992
State leaders, with their insatiable appetite for the quick buck plan to launch a new lottery game early next year called Quick Draw.It will be based on keno -- a game of chance (as the euphemism goes) that is popular in casinos from coast to coast. Lottery officials predict Quick Draw will be played in bars and taverns and other assorted dives around the state and pull in from $25 million to $50 million a year. The governor and the General Assembly's chief financial adviser are squabbling over the exact amount of swag the game will produce.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
The Powerball jackpot reached an estimated $250 million, after no winner emerged from Saturday night's drawing. The cash value is $166.8 million, according to the Multi-State Lottery Association. The game is played in 42 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. Virgin Islands. The most recent big winner in Maryland was a couple who bought the winning $128.8 million at a family-owned restaurant and liquor store in Cecil County last Christmas Eve. That was the second-largest winning ticket ever sold in the state, according to the lottery.
NEWS
March 15, 1995
The reason Maryland is doubling its daily Pick 3 and Pick 4 lottery games, according to a lottery official, is that other neighboring jurisdictions -- Delaware, Virginia, the District of Columbia -- have done it.It's no big deal, anyway, according to this official. It's just a marketing move.Oh, really?Let's face facts: By going to a twice-a-day format for Pick 3 and Pick 4 lottery drawings (except on Sundays), the state of Maryland is embarking on a significant expansion of gambling. It also opens the door to much broader changes via lottery games throughout the day.Is this what Marylanders want their state government to be doing?
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
A computer problem shut down Maryland's lottery games for 23 minutes yesterday, and state officials say the private company that runs the lottery will be fined for the statewide outage. The shutdown occurred during a peak time for ticket sales, the midday lunch period, said lottery Director Buddy W. Roogow. He said the company that runs the Maryland lottery - Automated Wagering International Inc. - must make up the state's revenue losses under its contract with the state. "We think total sales for all games that were lost is somewhere around $80,000," Roogow said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
People spent more than $1 billion betting on Maryland lottery games last year -- the most ever in the lottery's 21-year history.Sales hit the billion-dollar mark Dec. 23 en route to a $1.02 billion total for 1994, Maryland State Lottery Director Lloyd W. Jones said yesterday. That's an increase of 6 percent over 1993.The sales record will be announced today at a celebration in Baltimore for lottery employees. "It's a recognition we've hit a milestone for the state of Maryland," Mr. Jones said.
NEWS
August 24, 1993
Any way you cut it, the keno lottery game remains a losing proposition.The long odds on this game of chance make it nearly a sure bet that the vast majority of those who wager their money in Maryland will lose. And the fast-paced nature of this gambling game -- every 5 minutes for 18 hours a day -- ensures that those addicted to gambling will play often and lose heavily.Now the state, too, is ending up facing a big loss. Revenue from the keno lottery game fell a whopping 43 percent below expectations for the first six months of operation.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly reported the amount of money taken in annually by the state lottery's %J three-digit numbers game. The correct amount is about $351 million.The Sun regrets the error.No more waiting for the ping-pong balls to land.Or rushing out to grab the morning paper or a fellow purveyor of probability to rattle off the magic numbers.With the debut of the Maryland Lottery's latest instant scratch-off game, local gamblers will know -- in the time it takes to scrape a nickel across a $5 ticket -- whether they've won a million bucks.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Despite the controversial addition of keno in January Maryland's lottery games are likely to generate $30 million to $50 million less for the state budget this year than officials had hoped.Keno revenues are off, lottery officials say, partly because bar owners and other retailers were reluctant to install the electronic numbers game until it was clear the legislature was not going to prohibit it.But there are other problems as well:* Keno appears to be stealing players -- and money -- from other more established daily lottery games, such as Pick 3 and Pick 4.* El Gordo, the jackpot game pushed just before Christmas, was such a loser that a second El Gordo game was canceled, a $16 million double whammy of lost revenue to the state.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
Despite a sluggish economy that has many consumers pinching pennies, Marylanders are still willing to pony up a buck for a chance to win big. For the 15th consecutive year, the Maryland Lottery reported an increase in ticket sales, pumping more money than ever into the state treasury. Maryland sold $1.795 billion in lottery tickets during fiscal 2012 — $80.4 million more than the prior year, the state lottery agency announced Monday. The lottery contributed $556 million to the state's operations, 7 percent more than last year, and was the state's fourth-largest source of revenue, after sales, income and corporate taxes.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
Even before the start of last night's preseason game between the Ravens and New York Giants, Fred Stolper was a winner. He waved to his wife, Carla, and from about 20 feet away displayed a winning scratch-off game. His 8-year-old son, Max, ran to her to report the news: "Dad just won $20!" Stolper bought the ticket from a Maryland Lottery stand just north of M&T Bank Stadium on Ravens Walk, the paved causeway between the stadium and Oriole Park. The lottery has maintained a promotional table at the site for about eight years.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2006
Maryland Lottery sales topped $1.5 billion for the first time in the fiscal year that ended in June, a jump of more than 5 percent from the year before, lottery director Buddy Roogow said yesterday. More than $501 million in revenue is headed to the state's coffers, exceeding budget estimates by $10 million, Roogow said. Most is earmarked for the general fund, but more than $20 million will go toward the stadium fund. The lottery is the state's third-largest revenue source. State revenue, player prizes and payouts to retailers all increased by about 5 percent from last year's figures, Roogow said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | March 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - Lottery games are simply irresistible for many citizens. While most people realize that playing the lottery is more recreational than rational, it's a small sum to spend to enjoy the fleeting possibility of a windfall fortune. But what if the stakes were increased to play for your life? As bizarre as this suggestion might seem, millions of travelers participate in precisely that type of lottery each month. After Sept. 11, the airlines decided to rely on a random search program rather than using a comprehensive profile selection system.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
Once the engine of Maryland's lottery, Classic Lotto is sputtering as players choose to spend their money on other lottery games. Lottery officials say they are trying to find ways to revive interest in Lotto, a game in which players pick six numbers from among 49 for a chance to win at least $1 million. If no one wins, the jackpot rolls over and builds. Lotto reached the highest jackpot level in its 18-year history last week - $24 million - but even that failed to generate much excitement among players.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
A computer problem shut down Maryland's lottery games for 23 minutes yesterday, and state officials say the private company that runs the lottery will be fined for the statewide outage. The shutdown occurred during a peak time for ticket sales, the midday lunch period, said lottery Director Buddy W. Roogow. He said the company that runs the Maryland lottery - Automated Wagering International Inc. - must make up the state's revenue losses under its contract with the state. "We think total sales for all games that were lost is somewhere around $80,000," Roogow said.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | August 6, 1993
For the first time in three years, Maryland appears to have ended its budget year in the black without the need for new taxes or major program cuts.Based on preliminary numbers, Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein said yesterday, the state should close the books on fiscal 1993, which ended June 30, with a surplus of about $10 million.Not since 1990, when the state ended the year with a $4.5 million surplus, has Maryland government made it through a budget year with such a cushion. In the interim, state officials balanced budgets only after making repeated mid-year program cuts and raising taxes as Maryland struggled with recession.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1995
When Automated Wagering International offered to run Maryland's lottery games for half the current price, company officials said superior technology and leaner operations enabled them to propose the bargain-basement price.But AWI Executive Vice President Charles Brooke has added another, more intriguing explanation of a bid so low it sent a buzz through lottery industry observers around the country.The company, he said, wanted a chance to run its first keno operation, the rapid-fire numbers game played at bars.
NEWS
June 20, 1999
A 44-year-old Laurel man won the $1 million grand prize on the Maryland Lottery's "Scream For Millions" television game show, which aired last night on WJZ (Channel 13) in Baltimore and WDCA (Channel 20) in Washington.Saghir Ahmed, the winner, was one of 50 contestants chosen from more than 300,000 losing lottery ticket entries to compete for $2.5 million in cash and prizes.Ahmed said he plans to take the money back to his native Pakistan to share with family.Other winners included Mike Miller of Oakton, Va., who won a 1999 Chevrolet Camaro; and Jonathan Watson of Bowie, who won $222,747.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Some Baltimore community activist groups raised concerns yesterday that a last-minute change in state legislation granting property tax breaks to some downtown developers removes one potential obstacle to the introduction of slot machines to the Inner Harbor.John Paterakis, Baltimore bakery owner and developer, lobbied successfully for a small change in one paragraph of the bill that passed the General Assembly on Monday night to soften a prohibition on gambling at sites that have received the property tax breaks.
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