Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLost In Yonkers
IN THE NEWS

Lost In Yonkers

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 12, 1992
"There's nothing like family, boys," is the wisdom imparted to two teen-agers forced to live with their hard-hearted grandmother in Neil Simon's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Lost in Yonkers."The line is intended as a joke; it's spoken by the boys' gangster uncle as he stashes a gun under his pillow. The uncle is part of a family of colorful losers in this touching, bittersweet drama, which opened at the Mechanic Theatre last night.Bittersweet? A play by Neil Simon peopled with colorful losers sounds like a comedy, but this is a work that focuses more on character than one-liners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 21, 2002
Paragon Theatre Company has a tough name to live up to. And, judging from its debut production in its new Baltimore home, this latest addition to the local community theater scene has a ways to go. Not that Paragon's production of Lost in Yonkers is anything to be ashamed of. But it's not particularly distinguished, either. And distinction would appear to be mandatory if Paragon hopes to come close to filling its 300-plus seats. Although Neil Simon won the 1991 Pulitzer Prize for Lost in Yonkers, the play has always suffered from an opening scene overburdened with exposition.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 16, 1991
The two most recent Pulitzer Prize-winning plays, Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers" and August Wilson's "The Piano Lesson," have been announced as part of the 1991-1992 season at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre.The plays join the previously announced world premiere of "Nick & Nora," the $6 million musical adaptation of "The Thin Man," which will open the Mechanic season. The lineup will also include Aaron Sorkin's court-martial drama "A Few Good Men," which recently closed after two years on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | February 7, 2002
Paragon presents `Lost in Yonkers' There's a new community theater in town. The Paragon Theatre Company has moved from Crownsville to the site of the former movie theater at 9 W. 25th St. Paragon's inaugural production in its new home, Neil Simon's 1991 Pulitzer Prize-winning Lost in Yonkers, opens tomorrow. The account of two boys sent to live with their tyrannical grandmother during World War II was Paragon's final show in Crownsville last spring. Herman Kemper, who established the theater in 1998, directs the production, which features his son, Greg (the theater's co-founder)
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 21, 1991
Neil Simon's newest play, ''Lost In Yonkers,'' currently at the National in Washington, is good Simon. It may be a few minutes longer than necessary but is, overall, most satisfying.Some will think the play autobiographical. In it, two of the principal characters are brothers, 13 and 15 years old. That much may be Simon because the lead male characters in all of Simon's autobiographical plays have had brothers. Let's hope, however, that the autobiographical references stop there. Let's hope that Simon never had a grandmother like this.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2001
Throw two motherless teen-age boys into an apartment with a loopy aunt, a gangster uncle and a vicious grandmother, stir in some great one-liners, and you have Neil Simon at his best. Winner of four Tony awards, including Best Play in 1991, and the Pulitzer Prize, "Lost in Yonkers" is great entertainment by any measure and ideally suited to Paragon Theatre's compact stage in Crownsville. Set in 1942 Yonkers, the play, which continues through May 20, focuses on teen-agers Jay and Arty and their father, Eddie Kurnitz, who pays his dead wife's medical bills by taking a defense job dealing in scrap metal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 14, 1993
He's such a pleasant man, so affable and decent and committed. Who could suspect that under Neil Simon's breast there beats the heart of a monster, a cunning, hopelessly vulgar comedio-maniac who breaks out and wreaks havoc? Call them two men; call them Dr. Simon and Mr. Neil.Between them, these two gentlemen manage to ruin "Lost in Yonkers" -- the first, by not fighting hard enough, the second by fighting too hard.Dr. Simon is a physician of the heart, profoundly interested in dysfunctional families, particularly his own, and the pain they seem to generate like vapors.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1996
It's a long way from Oscar's and Felix's apartment to Yonkers.That was my overwhelming impression as I watched Colonial Players' current production of Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers" Saturday evening at Colonial's wonderful little theater just off State Circle in Annapolis.As with any Simonized play, "Yonkers" contains brilliant comic dialogue, but the edges here are sad, sharp and achingly human. Unlike "The Odd Couple," this is no TV sitcom waiting to happen.When Eddie Kurnitz's wife dies early in 1942, he must leave Brooklyn for a year to work in the scrap metal industry down South feeding the war effort.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2001
Since its founding in the summer of 1998, Paragon Theatre has offered uncommon shows on its compact stage at Trifles Restaurant in Crownsville - a 65-seat venue with full-service dining. With the latest production, Paragon is continuing its tradition of bringing unfamiliar plays to its audiences - even when the playwright is the prodigious Neil Simon. The show is Simon's Pulitzer Prize-winning 27th play, "Lost in Yonkers," a work that has rarely been done in Anne Arundel County. Following his autobiographical trilogy of "Brighton Beach Memoirs," "Biloxi Blues" and "Broadway Bound," Simon's "Yonkers" also has that kind of storytelling tone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 18, 1991
'Lost in Yonkers'When: Tuesdays through Sundays at 8 p.m.; matinees Saturdays at 2 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Through Feb. 10.Where: National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington.Tickets: $20-$37.50.Call: (202) 628-6161.*** Anew Neil Simon play might seem a frivolous luxury as the United States engages in war overseas. But "Lost in Yonkers," which is set against the backdrop of World War II, makes a poignant and surprisingly timely statement about the importance of love, warmth and family unity in times of turmoil.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2001
Throw two motherless teen-age boys into an apartment with a loopy aunt, a gangster uncle and a vicious grandmother, stir in some great one-liners, and you have Neil Simon at his best. Winner of four Tony awards, including Best Play in 1991, and the Pulitzer Prize, "Lost in Yonkers" is great entertainment by any measure and ideally suited to Paragon Theatre's compact stage in Crownsville. Set in 1942 Yonkers, the play, which continues through May 20, focuses on teen-agers Jay and Arty and their father, Eddie Kurnitz, who pays his dead wife's medical bills by taking a defense job dealing in scrap metal.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2001
Since its founding in the summer of 1998, Paragon Theatre has offered uncommon shows on its compact stage at Trifles Restaurant in Crownsville - a 65-seat venue with full-service dining. With the latest production, Paragon is continuing its tradition of bringing unfamiliar plays to its audiences - even when the playwright is the prodigious Neil Simon. The show is Simon's Pulitzer Prize-winning 27th play, "Lost in Yonkers," a work that has rarely been done in Anne Arundel County. Following his autobiographical trilogy of "Brighton Beach Memoirs," "Biloxi Blues" and "Broadway Bound," Simon's "Yonkers" also has that kind of storytelling tone.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1996
It's a long way from Oscar's and Felix's apartment to Yonkers.That was my overwhelming impression as I watched Colonial Players' current production of Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers" Saturday evening at Colonial's wonderful little theater just off State Circle in Annapolis.As with any Simonized play, "Yonkers" contains brilliant comic dialogue, but the edges here are sad, sharp and achingly human. Unlike "The Odd Couple," this is no TV sitcom waiting to happen.When Eddie Kurnitz's wife dies early in 1942, he must leave Brooklyn for a year to work in the scrap metal industry down South feeding the war effort.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | November 11, 1995
WHEN DANIEL Henson, Baltimore's public-housing chief, visited The Sun's editorial board last month, he remarked that he hoped Baltimore could look to other cities that had dealt positively with the relocation of public-housing tenants. He mentioned, among other places, Yonkers, New York.Having grown up there, I know that Baltimore, now grappling with a housing controversy of its own, would not want to follow in Yonkers' footsteps.Like Baltimore, Yonkers prides itself on a blue-collar, ethnic quirkiness.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | March 26, 1995
Robert Levin performs with BSOOne of the most important figures in the authenticity-in-music movement is the pianist and fortepianist Robert Levin. Levin is both a brilliant scholar and pianist, and his performances this week of Mozart's Concerto No. 21, with conductor Mario Verizago and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, should be fascinating. The program includes Haydn's Symphony No. 35 and Schumann's Symphony No. 4. Concert dates are Thursday Aand Friday at 8:15 p.m., and Saturday at 11 a.m. Tickets are $17- $48 Thursday and Friday, $10-$26 Saturday.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Anna Elashvili, a 17-year-old violinist from Baltimore, and Meredith Michael Reffner, a 17-year-old dancer from Glen Burnie, are finalists in the Arts Recognition and Talent Search program of the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts.As finalists, they will participate in a series of auditions to be held this week in Miami.The two young women are among a group of 111 artists selected from more than 7,000 young dancers, musicians, actors, photographers, visual artists and writers around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | February 7, 2002
Paragon presents `Lost in Yonkers' There's a new community theater in town. The Paragon Theatre Company has moved from Crownsville to the site of the former movie theater at 9 W. 25th St. Paragon's inaugural production in its new home, Neil Simon's 1991 Pulitzer Prize-winning Lost in Yonkers, opens tomorrow. The account of two boys sent to live with their tyrannical grandmother during World War II was Paragon's final show in Crownsville last spring. Herman Kemper, who established the theater in 1998, directs the production, which features his son, Greg (the theater's co-founder)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 14, 1993
He's such a pleasant man, so affable and decent and committed. Who could suspect that under Neil Simon's breast there beats the heart of a monster, a cunning, hopelessly vulgar comedio-maniac who breaks out and wreaks havoc? Call them two men; call them Dr. Simon and Mr. Neil.Between them, these two gentlemen manage to ruin "Lost in Yonkers" -- the first, by not fighting hard enough, the second by fighting too hard.Dr. Simon is a physician of the heart, profoundly interested in dysfunctional families, particularly his own, and the pain they seem to generate like vapors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.