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Lost His Job

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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 12, 2007
The last time Baltimore gave its police chief the boot, it fired the messenger, too. Matt Jablow, a former TV reporter who'd been the Police Department's spokesman for four years, lost his job in July, when Sheila Dixon ousted Commissioner Leonard Hamm. Jablow has just landed another job, as a producer for Bethesda-based America's Most Wanted. "I think it would be hard to find a job that combines my interests and experience better than this one," Jablow said. "Producing good stories and helping find bad guys is a great way to make a living."
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 17, 2009
In the buildup to the trial of Mayor Sheila Dixon on theft charges, we did not hear much about Lindbergh Carpenter Jr. He was not billed as the leading man or even a star witness. He is not, as far as anyone knows, a former boyfriend of the mayor. He's not a current boyfriend, either. He's not a real estate developer. He's neither mover nor shaker. But I have a feeling that what Lindbergh Carpenter Jr. said, almost in passing, Monday morning two flights above Calvert Street might have greater impact than previously projected.
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BUSINESS
By Novelda Sommers and Novelda Sommers,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2004
Go to the mall, take the bus or look around at your next family reunion. Chances are, you'll see someone who was laid off from a job in the past three years. Maybe you need look no further than the nearest mirror. A recent poll by Rutgers University found that nearly 20 percent of workers had lost their jobs because of layoffs since 2001. Among workers earning less than $40,000 a year, 27 percent said they had been laid off in the past three years. Here's how to cope if it happens to you: Step 1: Get your financial house in order The best advice for coping with a layoff is to be ready for it, said Bernard Kiely, a Morristown, N.J., certified financial planner.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 12, 2007
The last time Baltimore gave its police chief the boot, it fired the messenger, too. Matt Jablow, a former TV reporter who'd been the Police Department's spokesman for four years, lost his job in July, when Sheila Dixon ousted Commissioner Leonard Hamm. Jablow has just landed another job, as a producer for Bethesda-based America's Most Wanted. "I think it would be hard to find a job that combines my interests and experience better than this one," Jablow said. "Producing good stories and helping find bad guys is a great way to make a living."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
One of the first calls Kerry Collins made after he had been pushed aside for the newest college quarterback phenom was to his deposed New York Giants coach, Jim Fassel. Fassel listened to the veteran's SOS, then offered some sage advice. "Listen, Kerry, this is not the end of the world for you, just like it's not the end of the world for me," he said. "That's the way this business is. And it's hard for you right now, just like it's hard for me, or anybody else. "But you're a winning quarterback; there's a team out there for you. The biggest problem you have is timing because everybody's got their guy. You're going to have to sort through some stuff this year.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | February 22, 1992
More than 500 people turned out at Memorial Stadium yesterday for the chance to interview for 400 new concession and food service jobs at the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards.ARA Services, manager of food, beverage and souvenir sales at the stadium, conducted the interviews starting at 3 p.m. yesterday. The interviews will continue today and tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.Near the front of the line was a group of students from the Philadelphia Training Center, who had walked from the school on East Baltimore Street and arrived at the stadium at 10:30 a.m.One of the students, 19-year-old Leon Hector, said he would take "anything" ARA offered.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | July 9, 1995
A 59-year-old teacher writes that he suddenly lost his job after 35 years of stellar performance. A secretary in her 60s is convinced her much younger boss is making her life miserable so she'll quit. And a 40-something lawyer, now job hunting, complains that interviewers ask whether she can take "direction."All three think they are victims of age discrimination -- and maybe they are. There's a lot of it going around these days, although it gets much less attention than other forms of prejudice.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Lorraine Mirabella and Ted Shelsby and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writers | January 30, 1993
The local Westinghouse Electric Corp. division began notifying 460 workers yesterday that they would lose their jobs by the end of February because of the recent cancellation of a major electronic warfare contract.The new round of layoffs, the second in recent months, brings the number of Westinghouse workers in Maryland to lose their jobs over the past two years to nearly 4,500.Most of those who had been given notice left the Linthicum plant immediately after hearing from their supervisors yesterday.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | December 30, 1992
Kara Catlin packed 40 resumes, put on a bright blue suit and went looking for work yesterday at a job fair at Towson State University.Ms. Catlin, 22, was laid off a month ago and she came away from the job fair with no strong job leads. Even so, she's optimistic."I think it will be better after the first of the year," said Ms. Catlin, who lives in Columbia. "I think things will open open up a little."The state's unemployment rate, while still high at 6.4 percent as of October, is dropping and surveys show that confidence in the economy is growing.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 10, 1997
Experience isn't a dirty word in the job market anymore.Seasoned mid-managers and professionals are in demand again, say recruiters and job-hunters alike. In an expanding economy, large companies that have shed layers of managerial talent are hiring again. Start-ups and mid-size firms also are looking for expertise."It's a marketplace that's finally come to its senses," says John Challenger, executive vice president of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a Chicago-based outplacement firm. "Some of these larger, more bureaucratic organizations cut a lot of people, and they're beginning to realize they made a mistake."
BUSINESS
By Novelda Sommers and Novelda Sommers,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2004
Go to the mall, take the bus or look around at your next family reunion. Chances are, you'll see someone who was laid off from a job in the past three years. Maybe you need look no further than the nearest mirror. A recent poll by Rutgers University found that nearly 20 percent of workers had lost their jobs because of layoffs since 2001. Among workers earning less than $40,000 a year, 27 percent said they had been laid off in the past three years. Here's how to cope if it happens to you: Step 1: Get your financial house in order The best advice for coping with a layoff is to be ready for it, said Bernard Kiely, a Morristown, N.J., certified financial planner.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
One of the first calls Kerry Collins made after he had been pushed aside for the newest college quarterback phenom was to his deposed New York Giants coach, Jim Fassel. Fassel listened to the veteran's SOS, then offered some sage advice. "Listen, Kerry, this is not the end of the world for you, just like it's not the end of the world for me," he said. "That's the way this business is. And it's hard for you right now, just like it's hard for me, or anybody else. "But you're a winning quarterback; there's a team out there for you. The biggest problem you have is timing because everybody's got their guy. You're going to have to sort through some stuff this year.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 10, 1997
Experience isn't a dirty word in the job market anymore.Seasoned mid-managers and professionals are in demand again, say recruiters and job-hunters alike. In an expanding economy, large companies that have shed layers of managerial talent are hiring again. Start-ups and mid-size firms also are looking for expertise."It's a marketplace that's finally come to its senses," says John Challenger, executive vice president of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a Chicago-based outplacement firm. "Some of these larger, more bureaucratic organizations cut a lot of people, and they're beginning to realize they made a mistake."
NEWS
By James M. Kramon | December 24, 1995
EARLIER THIS month, rap critic C. Delores Tucker announced that the National Political Caucus of Black Women along with the NAACP and the National Baptist Convention, had launched a new campaign against gangsta rap.Gangsta rap, with its violent and misogynistic lyrics, has come under fire from Ms. Tucker and others who wish to ban it. Organizers of the campaign say they will create a "shame list" of record companies that produce and market gangsta rap...
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | July 9, 1995
A 59-year-old teacher writes that he suddenly lost his job after 35 years of stellar performance. A secretary in her 60s is convinced her much younger boss is making her life miserable so she'll quit. And a 40-something lawyer, now job hunting, complains that interviewers ask whether she can take "direction."All three think they are victims of age discrimination -- and maybe they are. There's a lot of it going around these days, although it gets much less attention than other forms of prejudice.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 20, 1995
Pauses. Sudden pauses. They explode in the middle of sentences and hurt as much as the words that come before them and the words that come after them. A man in pain speaks. He tells a story -- haltingly, in broken little bits -- about getting sick and losing his job and losing his fiance and his home and the support of his family, and everything spinning out of control and falling apart, and all the days becoming nights, and some hospital security guard with a gun locking him in a room, some doctor with a needle, some lost month or so in a mental ward.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 20, 1995
Pauses. Sudden pauses. They explode in the middle of sentences and hurt as much as the words that come before them and the words that come after them. A man in pain speaks. He tells a story -- haltingly, in broken little bits -- about getting sick and losing his job and losing his fiance and his home and the support of his family, and everything spinning out of control and falling apart, and all the days becoming nights, and some hospital security guard with a gun locking him in a room, some doctor with a needle, some lost month or so in a mental ward.
FEATURES
By SANDRA CROCKETT | July 19, 1992
Patrick Morand knew the game and he played by the rules.He studied hard, found a job and worked diligently. And he enjoyed the fruits of his labor. For nearly four years, he was the executive director of the Central Maryland chapter of the American Red Cross. He and his wife, Joan, owned a home in a new Towson subdivision where they lived with their three children. It was the American dream.Then came the American nightmare.Mr. Morand lost his job in April 1991 due to a reorganization of Red Cross branches here and around the country.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
As layoffs continue throughout the nation and hiring prospects remain poor, a growing number of job-seekers are being victimized by sophisticated employment scams.Using advertising come-ons, bogus employment companies are inducing job-seekers to send them hundreds of dollars in return for worthless job leads. Thousands of Americans have been swindled by the fast-moving companies, which often vanish before authorities can reach them.Just ask Wayne and Susan Darney, of Cockeysville, who say they were hoodwinked by a company that played on their hopes that good jobs were available overseas.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
As layoffs continue throughout the nation and hiring prospects remain poor, a growing number of job-seekers are being victimized by sophisticated employment scams.Using advertising come-ons, bogus employment companies are inducing job-seekers to send them hundreds of dollars in return for worthless job leads. Thousands of Americans have been swindled by the fast-moving companies, which often vanish before authorities can reach them.Just ask Wayne and Susan Darney, of Cockeysville, who say they were hoodwinked by a company that played on their hopes that good jobs were available overseas.
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