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Lost Generation

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By Stephen A. Myrow | September 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - The original lost generation, as termed by Gertrude Stein, consisted of a subset of Americans who survived World War I, the original modern war. Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald glorified its existence in the greatest American novels of the last century. After experiencing the brutality of war and postwar disillusionment, these men and their comrades exuded pessimism in the extreme and found it difficult, sometimes impossible, to overcome their futility with contemporary life.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
Standing O's artistic director Ron Giddings simultaneously honors two of the company's missions by bringing a play to the county that qualifies as a lesser-known masterpiece. British playwright Terence Rattigan's "After the Dance" is a largely undiscovered work that was first performed in 1939, only to be shelved and not seen again for more than 60 years. It will have its U.S. premiere Feb. 4, when it opens at Standing O's Black Box Theater at Chesapeake Academy in Arnold. At a recent rehearsal, Giddings said that although the play opened in 1939 to mostly favorable reviews, Rattigan decided to pull it soon after a brief run because he felt the characters might already seem dated as World War II was loomed in Europe.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
Scary. Disturbing. Viewers may find those the only words to describe "Finding the Lost Generation," a powerful documentary about crime and kids in Baltimore to air at 9 o'clock tonight on WBFF (Channel 45).And among the scariest things to contemplate is a remark by a former prison inmate, Norris Davis, who organized an August forum for the Fox 45 News program that included three drug dealers talking about their work."Some of what they say is logical," Mr. Davis says.The program, an outgrowth of a series of Fox 45 reports on crime, drugs and the juvenile court system, documents an environment in which drug dealing seems a predictable choice for many young people.
NEWS
March 28, 2006
Nearly 20 years ago, young black men were openly referred to as an endangered species because of falling social indicators and a growing sense that many - undereducated and caught up in the criminal justice system - were dispensable in a knowledge- and technology-based economy. A spate of recent studies shows that the crisis has gotten worse, not better, and that not enough is being done to combat it. The collection of studies from experts at universities such as Columbia, Georgetown and Harvard and cited in the New York Times last week paints a grim national picture of the plight of young black men. For instance, more than half living in inner cities do not finish high school, a minimal credential to finding decent work these days.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,Liz Atwood is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 1992
Moscow. -- They were supposed to inherit a superpower, but they were left with a broken and bankrupt country.In many ways, the Russians in their early 20s are the lost generation, reaching adulthood only to discover that almost everything they learned as children was either wrong or ineffective.They have come of age in a world where university diplomas aren't as important as personal contacts, and where black marketeers drive Mercedes sedans while government workers stand in lines to buy bread.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | November 6, 1993
Washington -- The young woman was sitting backstage in Studio B at Black Entertainment Television (BET), chatting amiably with an interviewer, when he asked what she thought of the term "lost generation" being used to describe African-American teen-agers."
BUSINESS
By New York Times | April 9, 1991
DETROIT -- When Sue Anderson passed her driver's exam 10 years ago, she inherited the family Mazda. After graduation from college, she bought her family's Saab.Last year, the 26-year-old graphic designer from Grand Rapids, Mich., bought her first new car. It was a 1990 Mitsubishi Eclipse."I never really considered buying an American car, which is not to say I wouldn't," said Anderson, who aspires to buy another Saab. "I guess buying a foreign car has been kind of ingrained in me."Anderson is part of the auto industry's "lost generation."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
Apparently no one told Amita Shukla, David Almquist or Jenny Jie Lee that they are part of the disillusioned, unmotivated and bleak-minded new "Lost Generation."A more accurate label for the three 18-year-olds -- and much of their senior class that graduated last night from Centennial High School -- might be the "Pumped Generation.""This is one talented group of kids," said Karen Goins, a guidance counselor at Centennial.Jennifer Lee and Robert Hawthorne, two of five student speakers chosen by the class, urged their fellow graduates to reach for high goals and to continue learning.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
Baltimore's WBFF-Channel 45 and reporter Deborah Weiner last night won a prestigious national award for excellence in news reporting, for a series of reports about crime, drugs and the juvenile justice system.The award was one of 12 Silver Baton honors presented in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards, in ceremonies in New York with host Mike Wallace, of CBS' "60 Minutes."The awards citation praised three special reports by Ms. Weiner broadcast by Fox 45 News in 1992-1993: "Justice On Trial: The Lost Generation," "Finding the Lost Generation" and "The Walking Wounded."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
Baltimore's newest television news operation, "Fox 45 News at Ten," has won the Capital Region Emmy Award as best news program in the Baltimore, Washington, Richmond and Norfolk markets.The weekend award from the Washington chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences topped a total of 11 regional Emmys won by the 2-year-old news operation at WBFF (Channel 45). The station's awards exceeded the total number of Emmys given to all other Baltimore stations combined."I think it gives us the recognition that we've been working for. Being two years out of the blocks is not an easy row to hoe," said Steve Marks, general manager of WBFF.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
The award for this month's most dazzling literary feat goes to Monique Truong, a Vietnamese-American whose first novel, The Book of Salt (Houghton Mifflin, 261 pages, $24) adds a brilliant twist to the old tales of the Lost Generation in Paris. Instead of rehashing stories of famous novelists behaving badly, Truong looks at Paris through the eyes of a young Vietnamese cook, Binh, who prepares exquisite meals for Gertrude Stein's stylish parties. Like Hemingway and Fitzgerald, Binh is a lonely exile searching for a cultural home.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 26, 2000
SYDNEY, Austraia - She can't just run, as much as she might want to just run. Cathy Freeman is a symbol as well as a track star, a symbol of colossal significance in Australia, a 27-year-old Aboriginal athlete who represents the shame of where her country has come from as well as the reconciled reality of where it could go - if everyone is willing to work for that, which they may or may not be. Her every move is weighed, measured and analyzed for its...
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 9, 1998
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- In the often flashy and violent Belgrade underworld, where gold chains shimmer, guns blaze and gangsters are revered by aimless young men, Darko Asanin was a hoodlum who stood out.Unlike many of Belgrade's "wise guys," Asanin disliked publicity, shedding his alleged drug-dealing past by acquiring a string of seemingly legitimate businesses. He ran a mirror factory, a casino that catered to the political elite and a cafe called the Coliseum.But this summer, Asanin's picture hit the front pages for the wrong reason.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
God, says Paysach Diskind, is in the midst of his latest miracle.And Mr. Diskind wants in on it.When communism fell in 1990 and the former Soviet Union began allowing Jews to leave -- nothing short of a miracle, says Mr. Diskind -- thousands of Russian Jews began arriving in Baltimore.Mr. Diskind has made it his business to meet just about every one of them -- not to peddle insurance or sign them up for English classes.He says: "I want them to be good Jews."A former salesman for the phone company, Mr. Diskind now works full time trying to make good Jews out of people who grew up under a system that said there was no God.He began his work as a free-lance volunteer after visiting Russia in 1989.
NEWS
June 18, 1994
School ProblemsYour June 12 editorial, ''Glendening and the Teachers,'' says that Marylanders are not getting their money's worth for their tax dollars. This implies, as does all of the editorial, that any deficiencies in education are the sole responsibilities of the teachers.As usual, you fail to address the primary factor for poor achievement -- the failure of the home, in an increasing number of cases, to send us a ''teachable'' individual.I have been teaching for the past 28 years and can assure you that students who are making the effort to learn are getting a much higher level of education today than they did 28 years ago.Teachers are working harder and putting in longer hours than when I began.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
Apparently no one told Amita Shukla, David Almquist or Jenny Jie Lee that they are part of the disillusioned, unmotivated and bleak-minded new "Lost Generation."A more accurate label for the three 18-year-olds -- and much of their senior class that graduated last night from Centennial High School -- might be the "Pumped Generation.""This is one talented group of kids," said Karen Goins, a guidance counselor at Centennial.Jennifer Lee and Robert Hawthorne, two of five student speakers chosen by the class, urged their fellow graduates to reach for high goals and to continue learning.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 26, 2000
SYDNEY, Austraia - She can't just run, as much as she might want to just run. Cathy Freeman is a symbol as well as a track star, a symbol of colossal significance in Australia, a 27-year-old Aboriginal athlete who represents the shame of where her country has come from as well as the reconciled reality of where it could go - if everyone is willing to work for that, which they may or may not be. Her every move is weighed, measured and analyzed for its...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
The award for this month's most dazzling literary feat goes to Monique Truong, a Vietnamese-American whose first novel, The Book of Salt (Houghton Mifflin, 261 pages, $24) adds a brilliant twist to the old tales of the Lost Generation in Paris. Instead of rehashing stories of famous novelists behaving badly, Truong looks at Paris through the eyes of a young Vietnamese cook, Binh, who prepares exquisite meals for Gertrude Stein's stylish parties. Like Hemingway and Fitzgerald, Binh is a lonely exile searching for a cultural home.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 29, 1994
SOLOMONS -- David Secor reaches in his shirt pocket, pulls out what might pass for a white pebble. The object is an ear stone from a 44-inch rockfish caught during the 1992 spring trophy season, and, the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory scientist says, it and others like it are providing insights to the life histories of Maryland's most popular fish.Secor calls himself a fish demographer, and by using the ear stones, or otoliths, he can replot where, when and to a degree why rockfish populations flourish or founder.
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