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BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | August 1, 1991
USF&G Corp., whacked by the costs of 17 storms and tornadoes during the past three months, said yesterday that it lost $56 million in the second quarter, continuing a string of losses that began last year.The giant Baltimore-based insurer, which is in the midst of a massive restructuring, said further employee cuts and costs associated with reducing the scope of the company had also eroded earnings."It is disappointing the timing and full effect of our restructuring efforts have not yet taken hold to sufficiently offset the unanticipated and unprecedented high level of catastrophic losses as well as the costsassociated with our ongoing restructuring process," Norman P. Blake Jr., chairman and chief executive of the company, said in a prepared statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Why doesn't The Sun ask Gov. Martin O'Malley if taxing the businesses that left the state or did not locate here in the first place because of the high taxes had anything to do with declining tax revenue ( "The budget apocalypse that isn't," Sept. 26)? That will be the day! F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
Robin Marie Williams' $15,000 bracelet -- a diamond-studded engagement gift from her fiance -- disappeared two weeks ago as she left the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse after serving jury duty.It was lost forever, she thought.But today, Ms. Williams and her bracelet were reunited -- this time forever, she said -- after phone calls from a man who said he had "something you may have lost.""This is so unbelieveable," Ms. Williams, 34, said hours before the bracelet was brought to her Harbor Court apartment by Ahmet Hisim, a prosecutor at the courthouse.
NEWS
Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Buying a diamond ring is always a costly expense. Claiming to lose it — twice — came at an even steeper price for Colby White, chief financial officer for Prince George's County public schools. The Maryland Insurance Administration has ruled White and his wife, Keisha, who works as an internal auditor for the school system, committed insurance fraud by filing a claim for a lost diamond ring that another insurer had already paid $16,313 to replace months earlier. The agency said the couple "knowingly violated" Maryland insurance law in filing two claims for the same loss.
NEWS
October 8, 2003
Maryland residents who lost food as a result of Isabel may be eligible for reimbursement from the state - but they must apply by tomorrow for the money. People with serious damage to their homes may qualify for a modified food stamp program, the equivalent of a month's worth of stamps. Regular food stamp recipients in 14 of the hardest-hit counties have already received half a month's worth of food stamps. Food stamp recipients who live in other parts of the state that weren't as severely damaged - including Baltimore - and lost food during Isabel can also apply by tomorrow for the extra half-month of food stamps.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | December 28, 2007
From the messy opener in Cincinnati to Sunday's debacle in Seattle, the Ravens have simply lost their grip on the season, as well as on the ball. The Ravens have lost 25 fumbles this season, which leads the NFL (by eight) and shatters the team record (by six). To make matters worse, these fumbles have come at critical times and have come from usually reliable players. With the Ravens down 12-10 in the opener in Cincinnati, quarterback Steve McNair's throwing arm was hit, and the ball fell into the hands of linebacker Landon Johnson, who returned it 34 yards for a touchdown.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1993
Rail Europe, the company that represents most European railroads in this country, has introduced a free protection program for buyers whose Eurailpasses are lost or stolen.The company stepped in to fill at least part of a gap when the railroads that participate in the Eurailpass -- which allows unlimited train travel in 17 countries -- this month dropped their policy of replacing lost and stolen passes.An official said the high number of lost-pass claims forced the railroads to tighten and finally discontinue its policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2005
ESSAYS A Field Guide to Getting Lost By Rebecca Solnit. Viking. 240 pages. Rebecca Solnit is a conglomerating writer, melding borrowed history with contemplation, curiosity with a pastiche of facts, snatches of contemporary song with passages lifted from Dante. Many compare this author of books like Wanderlust and River of Shadows to Susan Sontag, but I tend to think that she has more in common with Annie Dillard, whose thoughts often turn to the power of nature and whose prose is often graced with lyricism.
NEWS
By PATRICK T. REARDON and PATRICK T. REARDON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 25, 2005
Talk about a strange cultural pairing. It would be difficult to think of a better example of mainstream American entertainment than the hit ABC show Lost. The mystery drama about plane crash survivors on a mysterious island, which had its season premiere this past week, is watched by millions of passionate fans. By contrast, Illinois-based Dalkey Archive Press is famous in literary circles for publishing experimental and avant-garde books. The firm is lucky if it sells 90,000 books in a year.
NEWS
By Faith Hayden and By Faith Hayden,Sun Staff | August 18, 2002
Some pets are pictured in pearls, others are simply captured with tail in mid-wag. Some pets have been stolen from BMWs, others lost by baby sitters. While no two fliers are alike, they are all immortalized in a new book, Lost: Lost and Found Pet Posters From Around the World (Princeton Architectural Press, $14.95). "The book is very sad, yet very funny," says the author, Ian Phillips, 35, who lives in Toronto. "It says a lot about the importance of animals in people's lives. It's something almost anyone can relate to whether they have a pet or not."
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Players on the McDonogh field hockey team say they never openly talked about last year's overtime loss to Archbishop Spalding in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference final. In Thursday's rematch, however, the Eagles left little doubt that it was on the top of their minds. Led by a goal and assist by junior Brindi Griffin, No. 2 McDonogh stormed out of the gate to build a three-goal lead early in the second half, then held off a furious comeback attempt by top-ranked Spalding to preserve a 3-2 win, ending the Cavaliers' 17-game winning streak.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
When : Friday, 7 p.m. Coaches : Anthony Burgos, Franklin; Donald Davis, Calvert Hall Last meeting : Calvert Hall won, 28-14, last season KEY PLAYERS TO WATCH Calvert Hall : DB-WR Dionte Austin, Sr.; RB Damien Farmer, Sr.; WR Lawrence Cager, Sr.; WR Morgan Scroggins, Sr.; RB D.J. Watson, Sr.; QB Kenji Bahar, Sr.; DB Bryan Marine, Sr.; LB Jaire Dorsey, Jr.; OL Drew Devanney, Sr. No. 3 Franklin : WR/DB Steven...
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
An 18-year-old motorcyclist was killed after leaving the road and striking a light pole in Nottingham Wednesday, police said. Police identified the motorcyclist as John Adam Corvin Jr., of the 2100 block of Taylor Ave., in Parkville. Corvin had been driving east on Rossville Boulevard approaching Rolling View Avenue just after 12:30 p.m., when he lost control of his 1999 Suzuki 650 and crashed into the pole, police said. He was declared dead at the scene. Baltimore County Police Crash Team is investigating.
NEWS
By Robert McLean | August 23, 2014
I have watched the growing popularity of the "Ice Bucket Challenge" Facebook campaign against ALS - in which people dare others to record themselves being doused with ice water and/or make a donation to an ALS charity - with growing unease over the past week. My father, a physician at the University of Maryland, died of this little-known disease in 2001, about the time viral videos were beginning to take off. Until a couple of weeks ago, it was unthinkable that more than 2 percent of Americans would even have heard of ALS, though significantly more had at least heard of Lou Gehrig's disease - its other name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
I only have 2 million other better things to write about. But after 24 hours of waiting for someone else to unload on Sean Hannity, the Fox News host who defines political stooge, I have to say something. I held off when this GOP tool ran around on the Texas border in sunglasses and a baseball hat on backwards with Gov. Rick Perry. I even ignored the picture Hannity tweeted of him with his arm over a machine gun as he posed in a boat on the Rio Grande alongside Perry -- who we now know is really an intellectual giant because he has glasses with thick rims.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
One popular theory of lawyer Marilyn Mosby's upset win over incumbent State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein was that race played a deciding role in the election, helping a political newcomer oust a white prosecutor in a majority-black city. But Baltimore residents voted less along racial lines than they did four years ago when Bernstein knocked off veteran top city prosecutor Patricia Jessamy with overwhelming support in white neighborhoods, a Baltimore Sun analysis shows. An analysis of census data and precinct-by-precinct election results shows that Bernstein's support eroded in South, Southeast and North Baltimore - which contain the heavy-voting, majority-white neighborhoods of Federal Hill, Canton and Roland Park, respectively.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
This wasn't the way the Maryland women's lacrosse team was supposed to follow up its third straight national championship -- with an 0-2 start.The Terrapins returned from last weekend's Southern road trip stinging from a 10-6 loss to Duke Friday night and a 10-9 loss to North Carolina on Sunday. It is their first 0-2 start since 1989."To think that we lost more games in 48 hours than I've lost in my whole college career is a crazy feeling," said senior Cathy Nelson, a third-team All-American.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1999
A police evidence file that investigators lost, prompting a city circuit judge to set a convicted killer free after three years in the city jail, was found the next day in the folder for another criminal case.Prosecutors said yesterday that it is too late to change the outcome of the criminal case against William T. Flowers, 21, who was charged in 1995 with shooting a man six times in a pool hall during a dispute over a girlfriend.After police could not find the file containing a series of mug shots critical to the case by 11 a.m. on Jan. 11, the deadline imposed by Judge Thomas Ward, prosecutors cut a plea deal with Flowers.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
When Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco handed the football off and threw swing passes to Ray Rice this spring, he had a close-up view of the three-time Pro Bowl running back's physical transformation. Rice had regained much of his old quickness, displaying an ability to run away from defenders that all but disappeared during the worst season of his NFL career last year. Rice has lost roughly 20 pounds since last season, when he weighed as much as 225 pounds while struggling with hip and quadriceps injuries that robbed him of his ability to elude pursuit or break tackles.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Four years ago, Baltimore defense attorney Gregg L. Bernstein emerged from a private practice to run an aggressive campaign targeting a longtime chief prosecutor who Bernstein said had grown complacent. Now, as he makes his first re-election bid for Baltimore state's attorney, Bernstein is the one facing pointed attacks in the Democratic primary campaign - this time from a former assistant who says his leadership has already failed. Marilyn J. Mosby, a politically connected insurance company attorney, has seized on the city's persistently high homicide rate and pointed to prominent crimes to criticize Bernstein's approach to the job. The incumbent, meanwhile, has run an understated campaign that emphasizes changes he has made to the office.
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