Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLoser
IN THE NEWS

Loser

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 29, 2012
I was very surprised to read Matt Patterson's commentary in The Sun ("America the dictatorship?" Nov. 27). How did someone get a pro-freedom message past The Sun's editorial board at the White House? By the way, congratulations on your election victory. The media has now fulfilled its agenda which is to lift takers over makers. By 2016, we'll have a $20 trillion hole with no way to get out plus all the other little things this administration will continue to do as in Obamacare, bailouts, coverups, and, of course, let us not forget President Barack Obama's favorite constituency, illegal immigrants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Former NFL quarterback Scott Mitchell, who started a pair of games for the Ravens in 1999 and had a 12-year NFL career, will be featured on NBC's “The Biggest Loser,” a show in which people try to lose weight under the supervision of personal trainers. Mitchell currently weighs 366 pounds , but his NFL.com profile lists him at 240 pounds at the end of his playing career in 2001. He's currently listed as a bill collector, and according to the show's website, wants to get healthy for his family.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimote Sun | April 9, 2012
We had a spirited discussion Sunday on CNN's  "Reliable Sources" about Keith Olbermann's suit against Al Gore's Current TV. The video is at the end of this post, and I urge you to take a look especially at what Sharon Waxman, founder of TheWrap, has to say about Olbermann having played his games maybe once too often. Here's something Olbermann should perhaps be even more worried about: the fact that to win his suit he is going to have to trash a liberal icon in Gore. And how are Olbermann's liberal fans (however many might be left)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Last week, I thought Lt. Governor Anthony Brown was the loser among Democratic candidates for not showing up at WBFF's TV debate. And he was. But he was an even bigger loser Monday in showing up for the debate on Maryland Public Television. No wonder he doesn't want to do these TV debates. It's not just incumbency; he's terrible on television. His answers are just this side of bureaucratic doublespeak - exactly the rhetoric of Washington and Annapolis unaccountability that makes some voters want to scream.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
Can two photogenic, likable, hard-working stars make a film good all by themselves? Not in the case of "Loser," a listless, disjointed collegiate opposites-attract comedy from writer-director Amy Heckerling. But at least Jason Biggs and Mena Suvari, as two New York University students meant for each other more than either suspects, make the film bearable. Paul Tannek (Biggs, "American Pie") is one of those fish-out-of-water types you find only in the movies, a kid from suburbs so sub the rest of the world that popular culture never set foot there.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 26, 1993
And so, the end of the year is near.Hear, hear.If years were fish, we'd have thrown 1993 back long ago.From beginning to end, locally and nationally, it was a year of loss.Real loss. Sporting loss.The toy department, supposedly a joyful place, reeked of sadness.The big national story of '93? Michael Jordan's retirement, of course.He wins, we lose.The big story in Baltimore? We get whacked in the expansion game. Paul Tagliabue kicks us in the teeth.Isn't that special?And look at what else happened:The Orioles missed out on the postseason for the 10th straight year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Caryn James and Caryn James,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 2005
Is America finally ready to embrace its inner loser? From Benjamin Franklin and Horatio Alger through American Idol and The Apprentice, the rags-to-riches success story has been a central cultural myth. But now the most daring television heroine is Lisa Kudrow as an actress on a hopeless quest to regain her former stardom, in the new HBO series The Comeback. That show echoes, without quite matching, the tragicomedy of the British series The Office, about an obnoxious middle manager with no place to go but down.
NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | July 31, 1991
THE WORD from California that former Gov. Jerry Brown is considering a third run for the presidency next year, instead of seeking a Senate seat, will no doubt run into the criticism that as a two-time loser in the White House sweepstakes he'll be wasting his time.That may turn out to be so, but if Brown should run again and lose, it will not be because he has displayed an excess of #F Potomac Fever. More likely, a third Brown loss would result from an inability to shake the public's perception of him as Governor Moonbeam, the political space cadet who to many seems to be off on some other planet with far-out ideas.
NEWS
By Franklin Foer | July 20, 1998
YOU CAN talk about globalization, the sexual revolution or the civil rights movement. But one of the greatest upheavals of the century is the liberation of the nerd.Many have noted the rise of the Silicon Valley programmer and the iconification of Bill Gates. Few have placed these developments in context.Nerds, once defined as squares and losers, now also lord over Washington (Newt Gingrich, Al Gore) and Hollywood (Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino).Just as the women's rights movement revolutionized male-female relations, so also has this movement created its own turmoil.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 27, 1991
Image is everything?The outfit was cerise, black and white. The racket was hot pink. The hair was brown with streaks of blond. And the face was green.Say goodbye to Andre Agassi and rock and roll tennis.Looking like a man in need of a designer or a doctor, Agassi was shoved right out of the U.S. Open yesterday by Aaron Krickstein, 7-5, 7-6 (7-3), 6-2. Last year's losing finalist became this year's first-round loser."It feels like the tournament hasn't started yet," Agassi said.Actually, the Open began under cloudless skies and contained the usual first-day assortment of chaos and surprises.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, Erin Cox and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
An uncle of the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings said his nephews had brought shame to his family and ethnicity, while their father insisted they were innocent and had been framed. The uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, said Friday from his front lawn in Montgomery Village that he had been following news reports and never could have imagined his brother's children were involved in the attack. He and another brother living in the middle-class Washington suburb said they have been estranged from the suspects' family.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
San Francisco 49ers offensive tackle Anthony Davis called Terrell Suggs a “[expletive] loser” on his Twitter feed today after he took offense to comments made by the Ravens linebacker on a San Francisco-based radio show. Making an appearance on KNBR 680-AM largely to promote “The Coalition,” a movie he co-wrote, Suggs was asked about comments made by teammate Cary Williams following the Ravens' 34-31 victory over the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII on Feb. 3. Williams, a starting cornerback who was involved in a post-whistle scrum during the Super Bowl that led to him pushing a game official, called the 49ers “fake tough guys” and “pretenders” in the locker room after the game.
SPORTS
December 12, 2012
Goodell wins, loses Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times Roger Goodell was both the biggest loser and winner in Paul Tagliabue's bounty scandal ruling. Goodell's credibility has taken a huge hit over the course of this ordeal, and having his predecessor correct him in such a public forum has to be a blow to the ego. But Tagliabue did Goodell a huge favor too. By affirming the factual findings of the investigation, essentially siding with Goodell at every turn, Tagliabue did nothing to strengthen the legal arguments of the (formerly)
NEWS
November 29, 2012
I was very surprised to read Matt Patterson's commentary in The Sun ("America the dictatorship?" Nov. 27). How did someone get a pro-freedom message past The Sun's editorial board at the White House? By the way, congratulations on your election victory. The media has now fulfilled its agenda which is to lift takers over makers. By 2016, we'll have a $20 trillion hole with no way to get out plus all the other little things this administration will continue to do as in Obamacare, bailouts, coverups, and, of course, let us not forget President Barack Obama's favorite constituency, illegal immigrants.
NEWS
November 17, 2012
I and many other active Catholics, and apparently including many in the clergy, are becoming more and more disgusted with our bishops. If marriage is only between a man and a woman according to natural law, and it is the most perfect way to live in family as human beings, as they proclaim, why have they wasted so many millions on interfering with state law and not working on a real problem in their own backyard. Why don't they have the courage to stand up and campaign against the "mandatory celibacy law" of our own priests - surely this is against the natural law, and it certainly didn't come from Jesus.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
Americans across party lines all have at least one thing to celebrate after this election: candidates supported by small donors won a David-and-Goliath battle in a campaign flooded with special interest money. But it would be a mistake to think that this victory means special interest or secret money will not continue to influence our politics. Campaign contributions are not a one-time gift but rather an investment, with the expected return being high-level access to our politicians.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On the day after the '96 vote, everyone seemed to be spinning victory claims.Republicans and Democrats alike found a bounty of positive nuggets in the national election returns. And from the Christian Coalition to the Rainbow Coalition to the Sierra Club to the Chamber of Commerce came competing boasts that they were the ones who had made the crucial difference Tuesday.But in politics, as in life, everybody can't come out ahead. What follows is a highly arbitrary listing of some of the election's noteworthy winners and losers.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - As he plots his comeback, Al Gore is peering down a trail blazed by an unlikely path-breaker: Richard M. Nixon. Like Gore, Nixon was a sitting vice president who barely lost an election to succeed his term-limited boss. His defeat by John F. Kennedy in 1960 was the closest presidential contest of modern times - until the one in 2000. "If I was Gore, I would do exactly what Nixon did," said Patrick J. Buchanan, a close aide to Nixon at the time. "Take the abuse from the media and everyone that you're a loser.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
In my review Tuesday night of Bristol Palin's new reality show on the Lifetime channel, I said that I had come to believe that the Palins were history. The mass audience no longer cared about Sarah, Bristol, Willow, Todd or any of the other characters in this screwy Alaska clan. Here's some of what I wrote about "Bristol Palin: Life's a Tripp": But you know what? I am sitting here at 1 a.m. typing this post, and even though it's been a very long day, my blood pressure is fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
UPDATES WITH LINK TO RESPONSE POST BY GRETA VAN SUSTEREN: After watching coverage of the Wisconsin recall, I am convinced more than ever that it's time for a major press gut check. We have been in real trouble for a long time with cable TV news, but we truly have reached a new low of partisanship at MSNBC and Fox News -- and confusion at CNN. It's the confusion part at CNN that has me truly worried these days. Monday night after watching cable TV, I wrote about being "dismayed" by the polarized place that MSNBC and Fox News had come to. Scott Walker, the Republican governor, wouldn't talk to MSNBC, and Tom Barrett, the Democratic challenger, wouldn't come on Fox. Who could blame them?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.