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September 14, 2012
The Los Angeles Times is reporting that Tom Rothman, the Mount Washington native and Hollywood player, is out of his post at Fox studios. According to an email blast from the newspaper: Fox Filmed Entertainment co-Chairman Tom Rothman, who has led the film studio since 2000 with partner Jim Gianopulos, is leaving his post, according to a person familiar with the matter but not authorized to discuss it publicly. Rothman , 57, attended Park School, Brown University and Columbia University Law School.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | April 15, 2013
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un seems like a fictional character out of a satirical doomsday movie -- maybe a sequel to "Dr. Strangelove. " That fact that this immature brat and his gaggle of grim, aging generals actually rule a country and have the capacity to disturb the international order seems absurd in an era of global interdependence. In the 21st century, humankind should have moved beyond this, but apparently we need a few more centuries of progress before all countries are led by comparatively rational, democratically elected leaders -- or at least by boring, one-party bureaucrats whose main goal is to preserve stability and promote economic growth.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Jack Luskin was "The Cheapest Guy in Town." Daughter Jamie McCourt might be the most expensive gal. McCourt, who claims to co-own the Los Angeles Dodgers with estranged husband Frank McCourt, has demanded $487,634 a month in spousal support in their divorce case, the Los Angeles Times reports. She's said she'd settle for $320,967 a month if she's reinstated as the ball club's chief executive. This from a woman who told the JewishJournal.com last summer that her family's hard times in the 1930s instilled in her "a Depression mentality."
SPORTS
March 10, 2013
Forever a cut above Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Let's be honest. Luis Gonzalez didn't exactly smoke his single off Mariano Rivera in Game 7 of the 2001 World Series. He fought off a cutter and fisted it just out of Derek Jeter's reach. But that's the Rivera appearance I think of first when I think about his great career – one time he failed, not any of the 42 times when he nailed down a postseason save. That's how great Rivera has been. His ability to maintain his peacefulness on the mound in huge spots, time and time again, for more than 15 years put him on a level beyond the five relievers already in the Hall of Fame – Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Hoyt Wilhelm, Goose Gossage and Bruce Sutter.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
* Dr. Franklin D. Murphy, 78, former chairman and chief executive officer of the Times Mirror Co. and chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles, and University of Kansas, died yesterday. Dr. Murphy was diagnosed with lung cancer in February and died at UCLA Medical Center, a Times Mirror statement said. He was chairman and chief executive officer of Times Mirror from 1968 to 1980, and a director until 1986. Dr. Murphy was UCLA chancellor for eight years before going to Times Mirror, parent company of the The Sun and the Los Angeles Times, among other newspapers.
NEWS
October 23, 2009
JACK NELSON, 80 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Jack Nelson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who covered the civil rights movement and the Watergate scandal for the Los Angeles Times and was the paper's Washington bureau chief for 20 years, died Wednesday. Mr. Nelson, who had pancreatic cancer, died at his home in Bethesda, said Richard Cooper, a family friend and longtime Times associate. Mr. Nelson spent more than 35 years with the Los Angeles Times, stepping down as its chief Washington correspondent in 2001.
BUSINESS
By James Rainey and Thomas Mulligan and James Rainey and Thomas Mulligan,Chicago Tribune | September 19, 2006
The fate of the Los Angeles Times and the 10 other newspapers and 26 television stations owned by the Tribune Co. remains in the balance as its board prepares to meet Thursday amid pressure from the company's largest and most disgruntled shareholder to break up the media conglomerate.
NEWS
By V. Dion Haynes and Karen Brandon and V. Dion Haynes and Karen Brandon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2002
LOS ANGELES - While a measure to legalize marijuana in Nevada appeared to be losing, education ballot issues in California and Florida seemed to be headed for approval from voters yesterday. Emerging as arguably the most widely discussed measure was Nevada's Ballot Question 9, which inspired a variety of bad jokes about a high roller of another kind in Las Vegas. The Nevada initiative would have legalized recreational use of marijuana in quantities of 3 ounces or less for adults 21 and older.
NEWS
By Anna Gorman and Randy Lewis and Anna Gorman and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Famed rock music producer Phil Spector was charged yesterday with murdering an aspiring actress in his hilltop mansion in February. After the shooting, Spector told his chauffeur, "I think I killed somebody," according to a police report of the killing. Spector was carrying a handgun, the chauffeur told police. The partial report, obtained by the Los Angeles Times, provides new details about the death of Lana Clarkson, 40, an actress and nightclub hostess, which Spector in an earlier interview attributed to suicide.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
Margo Kaufman was a former Baltimore City Paper columnist who moved to Los Angeles and wrote three books of humor, reviews and commentary for newspapers and radio, and had credits for movies and television -- but proudly billed herself as the Hollywood correspondent for Pug Talk magazine. She died Friday at age 46 of breast cancer at her home in Venice Beach, Calif. Jon Winokur, author of "The Portable Curmudgeon," included some of her comments in the anthologies he edited. "She had perfect pitch as a humorist," Mr. Winokur said yesterday.
SPORTS
October 2, 2012
Cabrera lifting Tigers Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune I know Mike Trout has done historic things, but unfortunately his Angels team is also history, eliminated from the wild-card race on Monday, the same day that Miguel Cabrera's Tigers clinched the AL Central title. That's a difference-maker to me in the MVP vote. I will take Cabrera over Trout because one will play in the postseason and the other will not. Trout was a better player this year, and as such is a strong candidate for the Hank Aaron Award, but the Tigers wouldn't have sniffed October without Cabrera and now they have a chance to win the World Series.
FEATURES
September 14, 2012
The Los Angeles Times is reporting that Tom Rothman, the Mount Washington native and Hollywood player, is out of his post at Fox studios. According to an email blast from the newspaper: Fox Filmed Entertainment co-Chairman Tom Rothman, who has led the film studio since 2000 with partner Jim Gianopulos, is leaving his post, according to a person familiar with the matter but not authorized to discuss it publicly. Rothman , 57, attended Park School, Brown University and Columbia University Law School.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | June 8, 2011
Of the 44 U.S. presidents, all but a handful have been affiliated with a relatively narrow list of traditional Protestant denominations. Eleven were Episcopalians (12 if you count Thomas Jefferson, whose adult beliefs are a subject of debate), eight were Presbyterians, four were Methodists and four were Baptists. Others included Congregationalists, Dutch Reformed and Disciples of Christ. President Barack Obama attended Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, a congregation with traditional Protestant roots despite its untraditional pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. In Washington, Mr. Obama has attended services at mostly black Protestant churches.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Jack Luskin was "The Cheapest Guy in Town." Daughter Jamie McCourt might be the most expensive gal. McCourt, who claims to co-own the Los Angeles Dodgers with estranged husband Frank McCourt, has demanded $487,634 a month in spousal support in their divorce case, the Los Angeles Times reports. She's said she'd settle for $320,967 a month if she's reinstated as the ball club's chief executive. This from a woman who told the JewishJournal.com last summer that her family's hard times in the 1930s instilled in her "a Depression mentality."
NEWS
October 23, 2009
JACK NELSON, 80 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Jack Nelson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter who covered the civil rights movement and the Watergate scandal for the Los Angeles Times and was the paper's Washington bureau chief for 20 years, died Wednesday. Mr. Nelson, who had pancreatic cancer, died at his home in Bethesda, said Richard Cooper, a family friend and longtime Times associate. Mr. Nelson spent more than 35 years with the Los Angeles Times, stepping down as its chief Washington correspondent in 2001.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 4, 2007
Anthony Day, an editorial page editor for the Los Angeles Times and son of Pulitzer Prize-winning Sun journalist Price Day, died of complications from emphysema Sunday in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 74. Born in Miami and raised in Baltimore County, Mr. Day was the eldest of four sons, all of whom followed in their father's footsteps to pursue careers in journalism. Mr. Day's route through newspapers took him from Philadelphia to Washington, where he covered politics during the turbulent administration of President Richard M. Nixon.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
REVELATIONS that a political operative of the governor was spreading rumors about the private life of Mayor Martin O'Malley, and the mayor's comments likening the effects of federal budget cutbacks on cities to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, weren't the only developments that put Baltimore in the national spotlight last week. The city's horrendous homicide surge was also making news from coast to coast - or, at least, on both coasts. Two of the country's most prominent newspapers - The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times - took note of the city's mounting body count with extensive stories.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and David Zurawik and Mary Carole McCauley and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
From live updates on the news networks to nightly re-enactments on the cable channel E!, stories about the Michael Jackson trial have been as difficult to avoid this season as Law and Order spinoffs. But this week, reports about a court ruling in the trial appeared on the front pages of major American newspapers, causing heated debates in newsrooms nationwide about whether a news organization's primary responsibility is to inform its audience about the issues of the day or to entertain them.
BUSINESS
By James Rainey and Thomas Mulligan and James Rainey and Thomas Mulligan,Chicago Tribune | September 19, 2006
The fate of the Los Angeles Times and the 10 other newspapers and 26 television stations owned by the Tribune Co. remains in the balance as its board prepares to meet Thursday amid pressure from the company's largest and most disgruntled shareholder to break up the media conglomerate.
BUSINESS
By JOSEPH MENN and JOSEPH MENN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2006
The former owners of the Los Angeles Times escalated their attack on the newspaper's parent company yesterday, calling publicly for a breakup or sale of Tribune Co. after years of "disastrous" inaction and a 38 percent decline in the stock price. Representatives of the Chandler family, Tribune's second-largest shareholder, said the company should spin off its 26 television stations and consider selling some or all of its 11 papers, which include the Times, the flagship Chicago Tribune, The Sun and Newsday.
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