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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 8, 1992
I think that I shall never see a movie lovely as a tree, and "Medicine Man," set among the trees of the Amazon rain forest, confirms that suspicion.A medical whatdunit with overtones of ecological orthodoxy and metaphorical fancy, the movie isn't bad so much as unfinished. It's as if John McTiernan, the action director now trying a grown-up project, is working from notes rather than a script. This is his "Apocalypse Now," and he still hasn't found an ending.Like "Apocalypse," this one is about an arduous upriver journey through a merciless jungle; the difference is in the destination, which is a heart of lightness.
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By KEVIN COWHERD | March 6, 2006
OK, anyone who remembers anything about the last episode of The Sopranos raise your hand. Me, I dimly remember two things. I remember Tony Soprano whacking his cousin, Tony B., as he returned home from grocery shopping and thinking: "Uh-oh, someone picked up the wrong kind of prosciutto." And I remember the feds raiding mobster Johnny Sack's house and a terrified Tony fleeing through the woods like he'd just spotted a Dick Cheney hunting party. But after that it's all kind of hazy. And no wonder.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 4, 1992
"Traces of Red" is one of those thrillers that raises more questions than it can possibly answer, the worst of which is, "Why did I go to see this movie?"It's a cop-thriller, Florida style, in which a slightly smarmy homicide detective on the quest of a serial killer begins to wonder if the killer isn't himself. James Belushi plays a laid-back single cop named Jack Dugan who's sleeping with one of Palm Beach's more flamboyant Older Women (Lorraine Bracco, trying to play a sexpot, sadly miscast)
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By David Zurawik | August 12, 2005
In the sweetest news of the summer for lovers of great television drama, HBO announced yesterday that David Chase, creator of The Sopranos, has agreed to make eight extra episodes of the acclaimed crime drama. That means viewers can look forward to 20 new episodes instead of the 12 that are now in production for Season 6, which is scheduled to begin in March. The eight extra episodes will launch in January 2007 as an abbreviated Season 7. "We are obviously delighted that we will be able to extend The Sopranos series beyond its slated 12 episodes," said Chris Albrecht, chairman of HBO. "When something is as remarkable as The Sopranos, our audience would like to see it continue as long as possible, so we are thrilled that David Chase felt there are more stories to be told."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | August 12, 2005
In the sweetest news of the summer for lovers of great television drama, HBO announced yesterday that David Chase, creator of The Sopranos, has agreed to make eight extra episodes of the acclaimed crime drama. That means viewers can look forward to 20 new episodes instead of the 12 that are now in production for Season 6, which is scheduled to begin in March. The eight extra episodes will launch in January 2007 as an abbreviated Season 7. "We are obviously delighted that we will be able to extend The Sopranos series beyond its slated 12 episodes," said Chris Albrecht, chairman of HBO. "When something is as remarkable as The Sopranos, our audience would like to see it continue as long as possible, so we are thrilled that David Chase felt there are more stories to be told."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 10, 1991
Blake Edwards uses a familiar theme in ''Switch,'' does some predictable things and still manages to get a few laughs. Actually, he gets quite a few. You might even say that ''Switch'' is a return to the old Edwards, the man who turned out movies like ''Ten'' and ''Victor-Victoria.''You'll see some of "Victor-Victoria" in ''Switch,'' but then you'll see a lot of other movies, too.''Switch'' has Perry King play a womanizer, an ad man who is murdered by one of three women he has used. When he gets to that great boudoir in the sky, he is told that he has been a bad boy and that he should be sent straight to hell.
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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2000
Imagine every bad TV Christmas special you've ever seen. Imagine the fake snow, the cheesy backdrops, the forced perkiness, the corny Santa skits, the classic Christmas tunes set to the usual over-adrenalized rock 'n' roll score, the gooey nostalgia for holidays past. Now multiply that by, oh, maybe 10 and you have some sense of the treacle overload that is "Martha Stewart's Christmas Dream," tonight at 8 on CBS. Martha's fourth prime-time holiday extravaganza finds her at her controlling, annoying best, taking on a host of festive "how-to" decorating projects with a bizarre lineup of guests that includes Melissa Joan Hart ("Sabrina the Teenage Witch")
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By KEVIN COWHERD | March 6, 2006
OK, anyone who remembers anything about the last episode of The Sopranos raise your hand. Me, I dimly remember two things. I remember Tony Soprano whacking his cousin, Tony B., as he returned home from grocery shopping and thinking: "Uh-oh, someone picked up the wrong kind of prosciutto." And I remember the feds raiding mobster Johnny Sack's house and a terrified Tony fleeing through the woods like he'd just spotted a Dick Cheney hunting party. But after that it's all kind of hazy. And no wonder.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 15, 2000
He's got a mother who wanted to have him killed, an uncle who tried make it happen, a self-absorbed daughter, an unfulfilled wife, an overweight son and a crew of underlings that may include an informer. Is it any wonder that Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), middle-aged suburban crime boss, has a serious anxiety disorder? And now his therapist (Lorraine Bracco) wants nothing to do with him. "How many more people have to die for your personal growth?" she demands as she orders him out of her life forever in the premiere of "The Sopranos" second season on HBO tomorrow night.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | February 6, 1992
* "Final Analysis" is a psychological thriller starring Richard Gere as a psychiatrist involved professionally and personally with two dangerous sisters, Kim Basinger and Uma Thurman. Eric Roberts is Basinger's husband, but rumor has it he doesn't make it through to the end of the movie. Phil "State of Grace" Jonau directed, probably too much. R-rated."Medicine Man" has already been the subject of a nasty Premiere article suggesting extreme tension between director John McTiernan and stars Sean Connery and Lorraine Bracco.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2000
Imagine every bad TV Christmas special you've ever seen. Imagine the fake snow, the cheesy backdrops, the forced perkiness, the corny Santa skits, the classic Christmas tunes set to the usual over-adrenalized rock 'n' roll score, the gooey nostalgia for holidays past. Now multiply that by, oh, maybe 10 and you have some sense of the treacle overload that is "Martha Stewart's Christmas Dream," tonight at 8 on CBS. Martha's fourth prime-time holiday extravaganza finds her at her controlling, annoying best, taking on a host of festive "how-to" decorating projects with a bizarre lineup of guests that includes Melissa Joan Hart ("Sabrina the Teenage Witch")
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 15, 2000
He's got a mother who wanted to have him killed, an uncle who tried make it happen, a self-absorbed daughter, an unfulfilled wife, an overweight son and a crew of underlings that may include an informer. Is it any wonder that Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), middle-aged suburban crime boss, has a serious anxiety disorder? And now his therapist (Lorraine Bracco) wants nothing to do with him. "How many more people have to die for your personal growth?" she demands as she orders him out of her life forever in the premiere of "The Sopranos" second season on HBO tomorrow night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 4, 1992
"Traces of Red" is one of those thrillers that raises more questions than it can possibly answer, the worst of which is, "Why did I go to see this movie?"It's a cop-thriller, Florida style, in which a slightly smarmy homicide detective on the quest of a serial killer begins to wonder if the killer isn't himself. James Belushi plays a laid-back single cop named Jack Dugan who's sleeping with one of Palm Beach's more flamboyant Older Women (Lorraine Bracco, trying to play a sexpot, sadly miscast)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 8, 1992
I think that I shall never see a movie lovely as a tree, and "Medicine Man," set among the trees of the Amazon rain forest, confirms that suspicion.A medical whatdunit with overtones of ecological orthodoxy and metaphorical fancy, the movie isn't bad so much as unfinished. It's as if John McTiernan, the action director now trying a grown-up project, is working from notes rather than a script. This is his "Apocalypse Now," and he still hasn't found an ending.Like "Apocalypse," this one is about an arduous upriver journey through a merciless jungle; the difference is in the destination, which is a heart of lightness.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 10, 1991
Blake Edwards uses a familiar theme in ''Switch,'' does some predictable things and still manages to get a few laughs. Actually, he gets quite a few. You might even say that ''Switch'' is a return to the old Edwards, the man who turned out movies like ''Ten'' and ''Victor-Victoria.''You'll see some of "Victor-Victoria" in ''Switch,'' but then you'll see a lot of other movies, too.''Switch'' has Perry King play a womanizer, an ad man who is murdered by one of three women he has used. When he gets to that great boudoir in the sky, he is told that he has been a bad boy and that he should be sent straight to hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2004
NOW OR NEVER Start to work off those holiday pounds today with one of the Freestate Happy Wanderers' 5K or 10K walks. Participants can begin the non-competitive event any time between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., but they must finish the walks by 4 p.m. The events begin and end at the Owen Brown Community Center in Columbia. The Owen Brown Community Center is at 6800 Cradlerock Way, Columbia. For more information, call 410-437-2164 before 9 p.m. or visit www.ava.org / clubs / freestate. -- Sarah Schaffer NEXT WEEK IN LIVE Mandy Moore talks about playing the "first daughter" in Chasing Liberty ... LIVE's guide to visiting the Smithsonian ... Where to try out duckpin bowling.
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By Mary Carole McCauley | January 7, 2004
Actress Lorraine Bracco has dropped out of the entire two-week run of The Graduate at the Mechanic Theatre because of continuing family problems. A theater spokesman had announced Monday that Bracco would skip performances through Sunday due to an unspecified family emergency. The actress, whose most famous role is that of psychiatrist Dr. Jennifer Melfi in the television hit The Sopranos, has also been suffering from a bad case of bronchitis that has made it difficult for her to speak.
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