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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 2, 1993
Set this "House" afire! "House of Cards" is an irritatingly precious disease-of-the-week number, slightly inflated from the TV-scale of its ambitions by the presence of slumming movie stars and over-elaborate production.The title structure expresses the movie's reality: It's whimsical, vivid, wondrously constructed, fragile and utterly phony. But worse, it's metaphorical drivel.The House of Cards, which looks as if it were designed by Hieronymus Bosch and M. C. Escher and constructed out of tungsten-plated cards and industrial strength Krazy Glue by the graduating class at the Yale School of Architecture, is meant to represent the disease that afflicts young Sally Matthews, that wondrous magic state known so affectionately as "autism."
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By ARTICLE BY CHRIS EMERY and ARTICLE BY CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2007
Bathed in dim morning light from a small window, the infant lies in a hospital bed at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Like a faint flame, a blood-colored birthmark engulfs the sleeping boy's left eye and spreads up his pale forehead to lick his hairline. Dr. Anne Comi watches a technician pasting dozens of wires to the boy's scalp. She's betting on those electrodes to tell her if the damage has spread to the boy's tender brain - and whether she might be able to prevent the terrible damage it can do. At 40, Comi is one of the world's few experts on Sturge-Weber syndrome, an obscure neurological disorder that affects roughly one of every 20,000 children.
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NEWS
January 27, 1993
Movie and FactThe touching and well-made movie, "Lorenzo's Oil," unfortunately overstates the effectiveness of the oil and fails to mention side-effects.I direct an ongoing five-year study of Lorenzo's oil, now in its third year, that involves 257 patients with adrenoleukodystrophy and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration.In spite of our earlier hopes, the oil does not stop the progression of the illness in patients who are already symptomatic.
NEWS
By Alex Raksin and Alex Raksin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2005
Lorenzo's Oil - a dietary supplement concocted by Virginia parents in a last-ditch effort to save their son's life - appears to delay the effects of a rare genetic disease in young boys if taken early and in concert with a low-fat diet, according to the first long-term study of the treatment reported Tuesday in the Archives of Neurology. The study followed 89 boys with the genetic mutation for childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy and found that 74 percent of them remained healthy after 13 years.
NEWS
January 28, 1993
Bay areas law ignores rights of land ownersOnce again the Maryland legislature, in its annual trek to Annapolis, has not supported the rights of waterfront property owners as much as it supports land ownership among the general public.The Chesapeake Bay critical areas law has not been modified to guarantee the right of those whose property the law addresses. This shortsighted ambiguity has been presented to the legislature, which refused to recognize it in the 1992 session.The lawmakers' environmental supporters blind them into thinking the law is proper, even at the risk of legislative injury to a small segment of the population.
NEWS
By Alex Raksin and Alex Raksin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2005
Lorenzo's Oil - a dietary supplement concocted by Virginia parents in a last-ditch effort to save their son's life - appears to delay the effects of a rare genetic disease in young boys if taken early and in concert with a low-fat diet, according to the first long-term study of the treatment reported Tuesday in the Archives of Neurology. The study followed 89 boys with the genetic mutation for childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy and found that 74 percent of them remained healthy after 13 years.
FEATURES
By Frank Bruni and Frank Bruni,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 20, 1994
Back in 1987, when "Bull Durham" was being cast, Susan Sarandon had to pay for her own flight from Europe, where she happened to be staying, to America for an audition.In 1991, when "Lorenzo's Oil" came around, she got tapped to play the female lead only after Michelle Pfeiffer took a pass.But last year, when "The Client" was being decided, Ms. Sarandon was the first choice. She hadn't even expressed interest.Director Joel Schumacher envisioned her and no one else in the plum part of Reggie Love, a scrappy attorney with a big but bruised heart.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | January 23, 1993
MOVIES'Lorenzo's Oil'"Lorenzo's Oil" is a wonderful film about a terrible disease that attacks children. Susan Sarandon is as fierce as a mother lion as she and her husband (Nick Nolte), as Michaela and Augusto Odone, battle a medical establishment that moves too slowly for the pain and terror they feel. The best thing about the picture is its remorseless refusal to sentimentalize or trivialize: It shows how savage the disease is and how angry Michaela Odone could become. PG-13 rated. *** 1/2 . "The World Goes 'Round," the clever, zippy musical revue at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, consists of 31 songs by composer John Kander and lyricist Fred Ebb, whose credits include "Cabaret," "Zorba" and the movie, "New York, New York."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 22, 1993
A proverb from the ancient sewer of male fear insists that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. "Lorenzo's Oil" is a virtual blueprint of that proposition, except that the woman in question has been scorned not by a man but by a gene.It's the heroic story of two parents -- but especially the mother -- who watch in horror as their very special son is shriveled by a genetic disorder for which there appears to be no cure; they in turn are scorned by a medical profession that offers only platitudes about fate and the squishy tread of business as usual.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | January 26, 1993
Adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, is a disorder resulting from an abnormal gene passed from mother to son. This genetic mutation causes substances called very long chain fatty acids to accumulate. That, in turn, damages the myelin, the material that coats nerve fibers in the brain much like the insulating material that protects telephone wire. The myelin damage -- which to date is irreversible -- is what causes the neurological system to break down.While there are various forms of ALD, the most prevalent is the childhood cerebral form portrayed in "Lorenzo's Oil."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | September 24, 1994
Once a skeptic, Dr. Hugo W. Moser of the Kennedy Krieger Institute has recommended that all children predisposed to a deadly neurological illness take Lorenzo's oil, a treatment found by desperate parents hoping to save their ailing son.He said the oil, made famous by the 1992 movie of the same name, should be taken by boys who carry blood factors that place them at risk for adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) but have not yet developed symptoms.Preliminary data suggest that the treatment is safe and may be capable of delaying or preventing the onset of symptoms, Dr. Moser said.
FEATURES
By Frank Bruni and Frank Bruni,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 20, 1994
Back in 1987, when "Bull Durham" was being cast, Susan Sarandon had to pay for her own flight from Europe, where she happened to be staying, to America for an audition.In 1991, when "Lorenzo's Oil" came around, she got tapped to play the female lead only after Michelle Pfeiffer took a pass.But last year, when "The Client" was being decided, Ms. Sarandon was the first choice. She hadn't even expressed interest.Director Joel Schumacher envisioned her and no one else in the plum part of Reggie Love, a scrappy attorney with a big but bruised heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 2, 1993
Set this "House" afire! "House of Cards" is an irritatingly precious disease-of-the-week number, slightly inflated from the TV-scale of its ambitions by the presence of slumming movie stars and over-elaborate production.The title structure expresses the movie's reality: It's whimsical, vivid, wondrously constructed, fragile and utterly phony. But worse, it's metaphorical drivel.The House of Cards, which looks as if it were designed by Hieronymus Bosch and M. C. Escher and constructed out of tungsten-plated cards and industrial strength Krazy Glue by the graduating class at the Yale School of Architecture, is meant to represent the disease that afflicts young Sally Matthews, that wondrous magic state known so affectionately as "autism."
NEWS
January 28, 1993
Bay areas law ignores rights of land ownersOnce again the Maryland legislature, in its annual trek to Annapolis, has not supported the rights of waterfront property owners as much as it supports land ownership among the general public.The Chesapeake Bay critical areas law has not been modified to guarantee the right of those whose property the law addresses. This shortsighted ambiguity has been presented to the legislature, which refused to recognize it in the 1992 session.The lawmakers' environmental supporters blind them into thinking the law is proper, even at the risk of legislative injury to a small segment of the population.
NEWS
January 27, 1993
Movie and FactThe touching and well-made movie, "Lorenzo's Oil," unfortunately overstates the effectiveness of the oil and fails to mention side-effects.I direct an ongoing five-year study of Lorenzo's oil, now in its third year, that involves 257 patients with adrenoleukodystrophy and is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration.In spite of our earlier hopes, the oil does not stop the progression of the illness in patients who are already symptomatic.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | January 26, 1993
Adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, is a disorder resulting from an abnormal gene passed from mother to son. This genetic mutation causes substances called very long chain fatty acids to accumulate. That, in turn, damages the myelin, the material that coats nerve fibers in the brain much like the insulating material that protects telephone wire. The myelin damage -- which to date is irreversible -- is what causes the neurological system to break down.While there are various forms of ALD, the most prevalent is the childhood cerebral form portrayed in "Lorenzo's Oil."
NEWS
By ARTICLE BY CHRIS EMERY and ARTICLE BY CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2007
Bathed in dim morning light from a small window, the infant lies in a hospital bed at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Like a faint flame, a blood-colored birthmark engulfs the sleeping boy's left eye and spreads up his pale forehead to lick his hairline. Dr. Anne Comi watches a technician pasting dozens of wires to the boy's scalp. She's betting on those electrodes to tell her if the damage has spread to the boy's tender brain - and whether she might be able to prevent the terrible damage it can do. At 40, Comi is one of the world's few experts on Sturge-Weber syndrome, an obscure neurological disorder that affects roughly one of every 20,000 children.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | September 24, 1994
Once a skeptic, Dr. Hugo W. Moser of the Kennedy Krieger Institute has recommended that all children predisposed to a deadly neurological illness take Lorenzo's oil, a treatment found by desperate parents hoping to save their ailing son.He said the oil, made famous by the 1992 movie of the same name, should be taken by boys who carry blood factors that place them at risk for adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) but have not yet developed symptoms.Preliminary data suggest that the treatment is safe and may be capable of delaying or preventing the onset of symptoms, Dr. Moser said.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
It is a rare, 20-letters-and-eight-syllables-long disease, a lonely orphan in a medical system that tends to devote its big money and brainpower toward curing more widespread maladies. But now Hollywood has turned its golden light on adrenoleukodystrophy, casting Susan Sarandon and Nick Nolte as the real-life Washington-area couple who developed their own treatment for the incurable disease that doctors said would kill their 5-year-old son within two years.Lorenzo Odone is now 14.Why, then, has the movie about his story, "Lorenzo's Oil," which opened to generally laudatory reviews last week, received an angry thumbs-down from a renown Baltimore-based expert on adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, and a support group for its victims and their family members?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | January 23, 1993
MOVIES'Lorenzo's Oil'"Lorenzo's Oil" is a wonderful film about a terrible disease that attacks children. Susan Sarandon is as fierce as a mother lion as she and her husband (Nick Nolte), as Michaela and Augusto Odone, battle a medical establishment that moves too slowly for the pain and terror they feel. The best thing about the picture is its remorseless refusal to sentimentalize or trivialize: It shows how savage the disease is and how angry Michaela Odone could become. PG-13 rated. *** 1/2 . "The World Goes 'Round," the clever, zippy musical revue at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, consists of 31 songs by composer John Kander and lyricist Fred Ebb, whose credits include "Cabaret," "Zorba" and the movie, "New York, New York."
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