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By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | February 12, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The unveiling of President Clinton's policy toward Bosnia was greeted here with a sigh of relief. The threat of a military intervention has been averted for now.Belgrade officials did not make any official comment. But the tone in the government-controlled news media revealed satisfaction that the United States had opted for negotiations rather than the immediate, gun-blazing Western intervention demanded by Bosnian Muslims.Officials, however, privately expressed concern that the Clinton administration will now bend over backward to mollify the Muslims, who object to a proposal by international mediators Cyrus R. Vance and Lord Owen to divide Bosnia-Herzegovina into 10 ethnic autonomous regions.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 19, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Fierce fighting in central Bosnia-Herzegovina shattered a new cease-fire yesterday, and the republic's Muslim president cast serious doubt on the chances for a peace agreement that Western mediators have described as close to being completed.Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic said in a radio broadcast that he intends to stick by demands for further territorial concessions by Serbian and Croatian nationalists in exchange for an ethnic division of his vanquished state.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- International mediator Lord Owen expressed little enthusiasm yesterday for the Clinton administration's proposal to airdrop assistance to besieged Bosnians.In an interview here, the European Community representative in the U.N. peacemaking initiative also said that the Security Council may eventually have to impose a settlement on the warring Bosnian parties despite the Clinton administration's objections.He said he welcomes President Clinton's plan to airdrop supplies in eastern Bosnia as a symbol of determination.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1993
PARIS -- Bosnia's Muslim-led government and its Serbian nationalist foes agreed yesterday on adjustments to a peace plan that would partition the country. Hours later, mediators called leaders of the three parties to the Bosnian war to a meeting in Sarajevo on Tuesday, apparently in the hope that they will be ready to sign a long-awaited peace accord.After negotiations on the plan to create three autonomous ethnic republics broke down Sept. 1, the mediators said they would schedule a new round of talks only when progress seemed likely.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 1993
GENEVA -- A raging battle between Serbs and Croats in a United Nations-protected area near the Adriatic Sea derailed Western-mediated peace talks in Geneva yesterday and threatened to plunge the remains of Yugoslavia into a fiercer and deadlier phase of war.In violation of a promise to halt a 3-day-old military aggression, Croatian government troops infiltrated several miles into Serb-occupied territory near the coast and continued to fight along a 65-mile...
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | April 22, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- In a defiant response to tighter United Nations sanctions and the prospect of allied military strikes on Serbian targets in Bosnia, the leaders of Serbs in Bosnia and Croatia are planning to create a new common state.A decision has already been made to form a joint parliament, which would hold its first session Saturday.Yugoslav President Dobrica Cosic and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic have been invited to attend the session at Bosanski Novi, a Sarajevo district recently renamed Novi Grad, but there were no immediate indications that either would attend.
NEWS
February 4, 1993
The war in Bosnia will not wait for the Clinton administration to get its act together. That may be inconsiderate, but it is the way the world works. And it explains why both the mediator, Lord Owen, and the Bosnian Muslim president, Alija Izetbegovic, engage in such petulant haranguing of the U.S. president. They need to know where he stands now, not what he said last summer.There may well be no good policy option, only a choice among defective ones. Those, in the current circumstance, shake down to two:(1)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- A mood of annoyance and irritation is festering among ambassadors and officials here over what they regard as the Clinton administration's hesitant, clumsy handling of the Bosnia-Herzegovina crisis.The United States, according to this view, has undercut the work of former Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance, and it may have made it more difficult for the United Nations to forge some kind of a peace agreement."I am astonished," said a European ambassador on the Security Council, "and I feel a good deal of disquiet."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 19, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Fierce fighting in central Bosnia-Herzegovina shattered a new cease-fire yesterday, and the republic's Muslim president cast serious doubt on the chances for a peace agreement that Western mediators have described as close to being completed.Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic said in a radio broadcast that he intends to stick by demands for further territorial concessions by Serbian and Croatian nationalists in exchange for an ethnic division of his vanquished state.
NEWS
By Elaine Sciolino and Elaine Sciolino,New York Times News Service | January 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration was surprised by the decision of negotiators Cyrus R. Vance and Lord Owen yesterday to ask the Security Council to impose a solution to end the war in Bosnia, senior administration officials said.The decision, announced by the two mediators in Geneva, puts the administration in an awkward position by forcing it to choose whether to support what senior officials have called a flawed plan.The plan to move the peace talks to the United Nations coincided with Mr. Vance's presentation of a proposal for an interim government that some administration officials have criticized as essentially abolishing the legitimate government of Bosnia-Herzegovina and enforcing the ethnic partition of the country, as has been demanded by the Serbian aggressors.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Bosnian Serb leader's endorsement of a peace plan yesterday moves the United States a big step closer to deploying ground forces in the Balkans with, up to now, no clear public explanation from the Clinton administration of how dangerous their mission will be.The United States committed itself in February to helping enforce any peace agreement accepted by Bosnia's warring Serbs, Croats and Muslims.If the hard-line Bosnian Serb parliament approves the peace plan, it will test U.S. resolve in backing that enforcement promise.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As the United States prepares to forge an international coalition for new military pressure in the Balkans, European allies, swallowing hard, are reconsidering previously ruled-out measures, including the arming of Bosnia's Muslims.For months, Britain and France viewed the lifting of the arms embargo on the outgunned Muslims as probably the worst of the military options being considered by the United States. They were joined by other European countries and Canada, which, like Britain and France, has has peacekeeping forces in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | April 22, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- In a defiant response to tighter United Nations sanctions and the prospect of allied military strikes on Serbian targets in Bosnia, the leaders of Serbs in Bosnia and Croatia are planning to create a new common state.A decision has already been made to form a joint parliament, which would hold its first session Saturday.Yugoslav President Dobrica Cosic and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic have been invited to attend the session at Bosanski Novi, a Sarajevo district recently renamed Novi Grad, but there were no immediate indications that either would attend.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With Bosnian peace talks in a crucial phase, a key weakness in U.S. strategy is becoming clear: Serbs will face the introduction of U.S. and NATO guns only if they join in an agreement; if they continue to balk, they won't.If all three warring factions, including Serbs, sign on to the remaining elements of an international peace plan, the Serbs will face strong military pressure to give up their heavy weapons and territory gained in their yearlong war against Bosnia's Muslims and Croats.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | March 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bosnia's Muslim president, in a new twist on his bid to draw U.S. military support, urged the United States yesterday to enforce a cease-fire and help disarm warring factions before a comprehensive settlement of the war in Bosnia is reached.Drawing on the Clinton administration's offer to help enforce an eventual overall settlement, the proposal by Alija Izetbegovic would have the effect of using U.S. forces to freeze the military situation where it now stands in a partial agreement, strengthening the Muslims' position in subsequent talks on territory.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- International mediator Lord Owen expressed little enthusiasm yesterday for the Clinton administration's proposal to airdrop assistance to besieged Bosnians.In an interview here, the European Community representative in the U.N. peacemaking initiative also said that the Security Council may eventually have to impose a settlement on the warring Bosnian parties despite the Clinton administration's objections.He said he welcomes President Clinton's plan to airdrop supplies in eastern Bosnia as a symbol of determination.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1993
PARIS -- Bosnia's Muslim-led government and its Serbian nationalist foes agreed yesterday on adjustments to a peace plan that would partition the country. Hours later, mediators called leaders of the three parties to the Bosnian war to a meeting in Sarajevo on Tuesday, apparently in the hope that they will be ready to sign a long-awaited peace accord.After negotiations on the plan to create three autonomous ethnic republics broke down Sept. 1, the mediators said they would schedule a new round of talks only when progress seemed likely.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1993
GENEVA -- Hours after he seemed to have torpedoed an international plan for peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the leader of Bosnia's ethnic Serbs reversed himself last night and said he accepted the proposed accord.Much work needs to be done before any agreement is completed, and many previous accords have unraveled.But the mediators viewed the endorsement by the Bosnian Serbs' leader, Dr. Radovan Karadzic, as a critically important step.Dr. Karadzic told reporters last night that he needed "a few days" to gain approval of the plan from the Parliament of the self-declared Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, but that he was sure that, "We are going to approve it in our assembly."
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | February 12, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The unveiling of President Clinton's policy toward Bosnia was greeted here with a sigh of relief. The threat of a military intervention has been averted for now.Belgrade officials did not make any official comment. But the tone in the government-controlled news media revealed satisfaction that the United States had opted for negotiations rather than the immediate, gun-blazing Western intervention demanded by Bosnian Muslims.Officials, however, privately expressed concern that the Clinton administration will now bend over backward to mollify the Muslims, who object to a proposal by international mediators Cyrus R. Vance and Lord Owen to divide Bosnia-Herzegovina into 10 ethnic autonomous regions.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- A mood of annoyance and irritation is festering among ambassadors and officials here over what they regard as the Clinton administration's hesitant, clumsy handling of the Bosnia-Herzegovina crisis.The United States, according to this view, has undercut the work of former Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance, and it may have made it more difficult for the United Nations to forge some kind of a peace agreement."I am astonished," said a European ambassador on the Security Council, "and I feel a good deal of disquiet."
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