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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Seven months have passed since William Alex Haley walked to the Annapolis City Dock to see the spot where friends and fans of his late father want to build a memorial statue.But there's still no sign of their planned tribute. Now black community leaders are asking the city to help kick-start their drive to honor Alex Haley, author of "Roots," the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and television mini-series.Leonard Blackshear, chairman of the annual Kunta Kinte Commemoration and Heritage Festival in Annapolis, and several other community leaders plan to request that the City Council earmark $100,000 for the project tonight.
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NEWS
October 2, 2005
1767: KUNTA KINTE ARRIVES IN ANNAPOLIS When Maryland was a thriving English colony, Annapolis was a receiving port for transatlantic slave ships. One ship, Lord Ligonier, arrived from Gambia on Sept. 29, 1767. The ship had left West Africa with 140 Gambians on July 5, 1767, so the voyage took nearly three months. Documents indicate the ship's cargo added up to 98 surviving captives "imported" and scheduled to be sold by John Ridout. One of them, 17-year-old Kunta Kinte, had a descendant who later told his tale.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Friends and fans of the late Alex Haley want to pay him tribute with a life-size statue at Annapolis' City Dock, where one of his ancestors, Kunta Kinte, was led ashore in chains in 1767.Mr. Haley, author of "Roots," the Pulitzer prize-winning novel that traced his family history and became a highly rated television mini-series, died in February.A few weeks after his death, family members and friends met with Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and proposed erecting a memorial statue. A simple plaque, often missed by tourists, marks the spot at the harbor where Kunta Kinte stepped ashore from the slave ship Lord Ligonier.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 26, 1993
Seven months have passed since William Alex Haley walked to the Annapolis City Dock to see the spot where friends and fans of his late father want to build a memorial statue.But there's still no sign of their planned tribute. Now black community leaders are asking the city to help kick-start their drive to honor Alex Haley, author of "Roots," the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and television mini-series.Leonard Blackshear, chairman of the annual Kunta Kinte Commemoration and Heritage Festival in Annapolis, and several other community leaders plan to request that the City Council earmark $100,000 for the project tonight.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
Chris Haley, great-great-great-great-great-grandson of Kunta Kinte, sat at Annapolis City Dock yesterday afternoon, read aloud from his late uncle's acclaimed book "Roots" and extolled the significance of genealogy and family history in the pursuit of self-awareness.But first, he had to clear one hurdle: explain who Kunta Kinte was to his rambunctious audience of 16 Annapolis Elementary School third-graders who yelled, "He played in a movie" when Haley mentioned his ancestor's name."Well, actually, an actor played his part in a movie," Haley said, smiling.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Phebe Jacobsen happened to be on duty the spring morning 32 years ago when Alex Haley walked into the Maryland Hall of Records in Annapolis, lugging suitcases stuffed with yellowed photographs and documents.Haley, whom the state archivist didn't know at the time, sat down, opened the suitcases and, in his deep, resonant voice, began telling the epic tale of his long search for his roots.His enslaved ancestor had been the son of important people, he said, kidnapped by slave traders in Gambia and shipped to Annapolis City Dock in 1767.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2003
Though it has been nearly three decades since Roots first penetrated America's conscience about slavery, the name Kunta Kinte still resonates among people of African descent and many others. Perhaps it is no surprise, then, that Maryland's annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival will mark its 16th celebration this year. The festival takes place Aug. 9 and 10 at the Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds in Crownsville. Billed as a family gala that fetes the heritage, music and cuisine of the African Diaspora, it honors the legacy of Kinte, an enslaved Gambian brought to Annapolis in 1767 aboard the Lord Ligonier.
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