Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLoose Ends
IN THE NEWS

Loose Ends

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | August 24, 2003
KNOW HOW things get started but then never seem to get finished? Today, we tidy up some loose ends: Remember when we reported on this page in January that ratty 15-year-old carpet on Thunder Hill Elementary School's gym floor had gotten so grungy it was possibly causing respiratory problems? And then, remember reading later about how thinly stretched money was for the school system? We asked Linda Spano, a vice president of the Thunder Hill PTA who did much of the research into that group's lobbying effort to replace the carpet with wood flooring, what happened.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Welcome to the Season 4 finale -- downsized in drama and housing. "Downsized" being a relative term. Compared to last year's finale, when Matthew bit the dust, there wasn't a grand dramatic moment this time around. To be fair, this isn't quite a "season finale" in the American TV sense of the word. In Britain, this is the Christmas Special, re-packaged and re-promoted as the "season finale" here. It's a bit of false advertising, but we'll take it.  And the "downsized" housing?
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1996
Five years after Eastern Airlines stopped flying, the company is still very much alive.There are no pilots, flight attendants or mechanics. No blue-and-silver jets filled with passengers. Just 40 administrative workers in the threadbare Miami headquarters tower, with 7,000 boxes of paperwork left to do."It's difficult for some people to comprehend that there's still an entity around," said John Sicilian, a lawyer leading the effort to tie up loose ends. "Any time you have a 60-year-old institution that was as asset-laden as Eastern, it takes a long time to settle affairs."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 1, 2012
For the first time in more than a month, the players will have a rare weekend off as coach John Harbaugh sent them home to take care of their families and tie up loose ends before the start of the regular season. And with the Ravens slated to open the season on Monday, Sept. 10 and many of the starters kept out of Thursday night's preseason finale against the St. Louis Rams, the players will enjoy a rare extended chance to rest and relax. Harbaugh said the time off should be a significant benefit for the players.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2000
In a surprise reversal, state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell turned his back yesterday on a $150,000-a-year job heading a state agency, announcing that he will instead stay in the Senate where he holds the chairmanship of a powerful legislative committee. The Baltimore County Democrat said he decided after several weeks of contemplation to turn down the job of chief executive officer and president of the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund, a position that would have paid him $150,000 plus $50,000 a year in benefits.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 20, 1991
MOSCOW -- The hard-line Communists who ousted Mikhail S. Gorbachev from power moved yesterday to claim control of the country, but opposition to the coup rallied around Russia's president, Boris N. Yeltsin, and threatened to split the army.Thousands of people who had gathered outside the Russian parliament building cheered and shouted "Yeltsin, Yeltsin," when tanks from the elite Tamanskaya division shifted position just after 10 p.m. Moscow time and pointed their guns outward.Other loose ends were appearing in the coup that had seemed so chillingly final in the morning hours.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After about 114 hours of near-nonstop campaigning, Bob Dole finally got a full night's sleep Tuesday night in his own bed.He woke up yesterday with, as he had foreseen, nothing to do. For the first time in nearly half a century, he held no political office, having resigned from the Senate to run for president and then watched as his presidential aspirations were crushed in Bill Clinton's landslide victory Tuesday.Dole spent a few quiet hours at his campaign headquarters here yesterday afternoon, wrapping up loose ends, posing for pictures with his aides and his Secret Service detail and perhaps giving a thought to the future.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 5, 1997
Wouldn't it be nice if before we die, a guardian angel not only notified us of our impending demise, but encouraged us to tie up any emotional loose ends so we could die in peace?That's the basic premise of Robert Leland Taylor's "Those Strange and Glorious Years," the first play in the 16th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival.As directed by Bob Bardoff at the Spotlighters, it's well-acted -- particularly by lead actors Tony Colavito, as Dennis, the over-worked businessman who is about to kick off, and Belinda Kalinin as his unfaithful young wife, Vera.
NEWS
By Linda Marie Flaherty | September 6, 1994
I can't finish a thoughtor put a line togetherin writingWith pounding urgencythe night of your dayscollides into the dreamsof my nightAnd I, who love you,am left at loose endsof the sentenceSearching in all thewrong placesfor all the rightpunctuationto put its meaning back.You interruptthe rhythm of my soul'scomposingbut no dictionary helps me now.Your life is a questionI can't answer.Linda Marie Flaherty writes from Baltimore.jTC
NEWS
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,The Orlando Sentinel | June 8, 1997
"Up Island," by Anne Rivers Siddons. HarperCollins. 342 pages. $24.There is a heavy hand at work when it comes to heapintroubles on this heroine, and there's nothing subtle about her message of renewal. Still, "Up Island" is an emotionally truthful, satisfying story.The author creates convincing and sympathetic characters. Knowing, too, that real life is a messy business, she doesn't neatly tie up all the loose ends. The heroine's got a ways to go yet, and she's not sure in exactly which direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | June 9, 2012
Just how many subplots swirled about in tonight's season premiere? I think I lost count at 32. While it's always good to meet new characters (like Vampire Authority rep Nora, who gives off a distinct Rachel Weisz vibe) and see others get extended time (always good to see Pam!), the Bon Temps community is getting a bit crowded -- and a bit hard to follow. You're not sure what you're supposed to care about most: Sookie, who used to be the main character and is now often shifted to the background?
SPORTS
December 25, 2010
One word or two. That was the hard part for fly fishing guide Joe Bruce to decide. Is his new fly a Bullethead Darter or a Bullet-head Darter? It doesn't matter if it works, I suppose. And Bruce says the BD (how's that for getting around the issue?) is his "go to" fly in all conditions, for both freshwater and saltwater fish. Bruce, who used to own The Fisherman's Edge in Catonsville, says he was looking for a fly last summer that would work when water was low and clear and fish could see what was being offered.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
There seemed to be some loose ends left to tie up after the Maryland men's basketball season ended in Kansas City, Mo., on Saturday in that loss to Memphis in the second round of the NCAA tournament. A little matter of Gary Williams and Debbie Yow sitting down and hashing out (or thrashing out) any lingering bad feelings about the midseason square-off between the coach and athletic department officials, the one that took the long-rumored in-house feuding out into public. As it turns out, though, there are no loose ends.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
For some years now, the state prosecutor's long-running investigation of City Hall shenanigans has played out like Chinese water torture, drip by excruciating drip. A subpoena here, a plea bargain there, even a raid on the mayor's home - but what did it all add up to? We may not have the full answer yet, but yesterday at least brought the splash of actual indictments. City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton and developer Ronald H. Lipscomb were indicted on charges related to an alleged bribery scheme.
NEWS
By RICK MAESE | July 25, 2008
It's handy and it's dandy. Easy to fold and easy to hold. When you see your favorite politician, pass it on. When you see your local sports team owner, be sure to share. Because here it is for the very first time: The definitive, dead-on, no-excuses checklist. If your city can't check off each of these items - ahem, pay attention, Baltimore - then maybe it should think twice before throwing public money at a sports arena or stadium. 1. Is private money available? Here's a new formula: If Team Owner is worth anywhere in the neighborhood of two times the cost of a proposed arena, let him sign the check.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Joel Havemann and Richard Simon and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The ousted Republican-led Congress returns to the Capitol this week to try one last time to shorten a long legislative to-do list, while the just-elected members will vote for new leaders in races that could signal the direction the parties will take next year. The lame-duck session mixes a dispirited Republican Party and a Democratic Party that knows it will soon have the upper hand in both houses -- a potentially combustible cocktail. At minimum, Congress must pass a temporary spending bill to keep the government running until the next Congress takes office.
NEWS
October 10, 1991
At the end of the day today, Maryland taxpayers will have shelled out roughly $43,000 to finance the special General Assembly session. Every day the House and Senate meet after today will add, on average, an additional $6,500 to the cost.That may not seem like much, but $43,000 could be two state jobs, and the $6,500 a day tab could provide annual grants for two to three General Public Assistance recipients. Certainly it's worth the cost if lawmakers can come up with $450 million to balance the budget.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Richard Irwin and Bruce Reid and Richard Irwin,Staff Writers Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | February 27, 1992
State Police today were trying to sort out countless loose ends involving the attempted murder of a Baltimore businessman found near a road in Sykesville yesterday after being stabbed and beaten.The victim, Frank Allan Storch, 34, of the 6700 block of Westbrook Road in northwest Baltimore, had multiple stab wounds to the abdomen and head injuries, was in serious but stable condition today at the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center in Baltimore.Mr. Storch was flown there after being spotted by motorists as he walked along Arrington Road west of Marriottsville Road No. 2, police said.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | October 31, 2006
Friends and readers often suggest column topics to me. It is a bit like asking a doctor for medical advice while at a cocktail party. Often, their suggestions can be dispensed with in a couple of thoughtful sentences - hardly enough to fill the newspaper space set aside for me each week - and my response goes something like this: "Fine. Sounds good. But what is the rest of the column?" This space is dedicated to those too-brief ideas - some suggested to me, some my own - that don't require much more discussion than is contained here.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 20, 2006
LONDON -- Two hundred years of history are coming unstitched on Savile Row, as tailors who make bespoke clothes for the rich and famous flee soaring rents. Sewing shops along the street where Fred Astaire, Cary Grant and Britain's Prince Charles once bought custom-made suits are being converted into luxury offices and stores. The growth of London's financial services industry has made the West End, where Savile Row is located, the most expensive place in the world to rent office space.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.