Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLoophole
IN THE NEWS

Loophole

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 2012
I read with interest the article about the Do Not Call Registry ("Government cracks down on robocalls," Feb. 16). It suggested that the Federal Communications Commission is clamping down and closing many of the loopholes in the telemarketing rules. Unfortunately, the FCC will not close one of the most egregious loopholes - namely the one allowing "political" robocalls. When the original law was passed creating the Do Not Call list, the politicians, in their typical arrogant way, exempted themselves from the ban. At election time, we are all bombarded with these intrusive calls as a result.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A prominent Democrat lawmaker said Thursday he would work to close what he called "the Hogan loophole," which he said allowed Republican Larry Hogan "to pocket" public money during Hogan's campaign for governor. Economic Matters Committee chairman Del. Dereck Davis said he would seek stiffer rules for politicians who accept public financing, as Hogan as done. Among those provisions: forbidding spending public money in a way that improves a candidate's financial fortunes. Hogan's campaign, meanwhile, called the issue "absurd.
Advertisement
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A prominent Democrat lawmaker said Thursday he would work to close what he called "the Hogan loophole," which he said allowed Republican Larry Hogan "to pocket" public money during Hogan's campaign for governor. Economic Matters Committee chairman Del. Dereck Davis said he would seek stiffer rules for politicians who accept public financing, as Hogan as done. Among those provisions: forbidding spending public money in a way that improves a candidate's financial fortunes. Hogan's campaign, meanwhile, called the issue "absurd.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Congress needs to pass the Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) so there is real and fair competition reflecting 21st century commerce. America was built on promoting economic growth and business in a fashion that ensures fair competition for all. Today, online-only retailers are not required to charge and collect sales tax, while local businesses must. However, the sales tax (in all but five states) is still owed. The collection of these taxes is difficult to enforce unless online sellers have either a physical store or a warehouse within the state.
NEWS
December 12, 2009
- In a victory for people with cancer and other serious medical problems, the White House agreed Friday to help close a loophole in the Senate health care bill allowing annual dollar limits on their care. "The president has made it clear that health insurance reform legislation should prevent insurance companies from placing annual limits on health expenditures that can force families into financial ruin," said White House spokesman Reid Cherlin. The move was applauded by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, which first called attention to the problem.
NEWS
April 5, 2005
LAWMAKERS SHOULD be outraged -- but, predictably, they don't seem to be. Reports show Edward A. St. John of MIE Properties has poured $160,000 into the state's 2006 election. To accomplish this feat, he had to bypass the state's law restricting donations to $4,000 for individuals and $10,000 per company. How did he do it? By funneling the money through more than 50 companies he runs out of his Baltimore County office. And why would Mr. St. John have so many subsidiaries? Because property-holding firms such as MIE typically sort their holdings into LLCs and LLPs -- limited liability corporations and limited liability partnerships.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
A loophole in state campaign finance laws allowed contributors to Maryland candidates and political groups to pump $4.3 million into the 2010 election cycle while remaining anonymous — denying citizens a thorough look at the money that flows into politics. The State Board of Elections discourages candidates from using the "lump sum" label on campaign finance reports, and Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has taken issue with the practice. But it remains legal and has been used by Democrats and Republicans alike, enabling some local candidates to finance their races without disclosing large numbers of donors.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Under Maryland law, there's a limit to how much money a citizen can donate to state political campaigns — $4,000 to a single candidate, $10,000 in total donations during a four-year election cycle. But some Marylanders are less limited than others. Take, for instance, the developer Edward St. John. Through dozens of corporations he owns that operate out of the headquarters of St. John Properties in Baltimore County, he's funneled more than $250,000 to Maryland politicians of both parties over the past two years.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
When the General Assembly passed the Maryland Dream Act, lawmakers intended to allow certain students who are undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's colleges and universities. It was a recognition that these young people represented an asset to the state to be cultivated, not a threat. But the law contained an unintended consequence no one seems to have noticed at the time, and the result has been that rather than lowering college tuition costs for these young people, some of them are now paying more for their educations.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 30, 1998
Republicans in the General Assembly said yesterday they want to close a loophole that Senate Democrats hope to exploit to steer unlimited amounts of campaign money to candidates they support.The 31 incumbent Democrats, led by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, have created the Maryland Democratic Senatorial Committee -- a so-called "slate" -- in an attempt to raise and shift hundreds of thousands of dollars to candidates who might need it, particularly nine incumbents targeted by the GOP.Under Maryland election law, a candidate is limited to transferring $6,000 through his or her campaign committee to any other committee.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 4, 2014
A bill aimed at preventing guns from being sold to people legally barred from owning them drew fire Tuesday night in Annapolis, as gun rights advocates charged the measure would simply let state authorities drag out sales now delayed for months because of a large backlog in Maryland State Police background checks. The bill by Del. Jon S. Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat, would require that a prospective gun owner's background check be complete before the weapon's sale, transfer or lease, regardless of how long that takes.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown said Saturday that his campaign would forgo the use of a loophole that might have allowed his running mate to raise money during the General Assembly session - portraying the decision as a matter of principle. In response, the rival campaign of Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler accused Brown of "talking out of both sides of his mouth. " Brown, Maryland's lieutenant governor, issued a statement saying that Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has halted fundraising activities since the legislature convened in January and won't resume until the session ends.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
For decades, well-heeled contributors have been able to extend Maryland's campaign donation limits through a quirk in state law known to reform advocates as the "LLC loophole. " The General Assembly passed legislation in 2013 to close the loophole as of the next four-year election cycle, but campaign finance reports filed last week show it is enjoying a last hurrah in the 2014 governor's race. Here's how the loophole works: Maryland law limits an individual or company to a donation of $4,000 to a single candidate or $10,000 to all candidates combined.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
In his commentary, "What used cars have to do with health insurance," (Oct. 20), Darrel J. Gaskin describes adverse selection and its effect on insurance rates. He goes on to describe what the insurance companies do to address adverse selection, how those "tools" affect rates and how the Affordable Care Act will solve these problems. But I disagree with one sentence in his piece. "Insurers must issue policies to all prospective buyers, and all individuals must buy now and can't wait until they are sick.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 30, 2013
Almost everyone knows CEO pay is out of control. It surged 16 percent at big companies last year, according to the New York Times, and the typical CEO raked in $15.1 million. Meanwhile, the median wage continued to drop, adjusted for inflation. What's less well-known is that you and I and other taxpayers are subsidizing this sky-high executive compensation. That's because corporations deduct it from their income taxes, causing the rest of us to pay more in taxes to make up the difference.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
The average taxpayer should be fuming over the recent legislative audit of the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation. Not because of the various oversights or recordkeeping problems the auditors uncovered. Those are correctable. Not so the legal loophole that has allowed owners of multimillion-dollar commercial properties to dodge taxes that the rest of us routinely pay. And the problem is getting worse. Here's how it works. Back in the 1990s, lawmakers decided to allow commercial property to be held in limited liability partnerships or corporations as a way to protect individual investors from personal liability in the event of civil actions.
NEWS
February 27, 2004
LIMITED LIABILITY companies are smart business. LLCs and the similar LLPs (limited liability partnerships) were created as a hybrid between corporations and partnerships in the early 1990s to help shield small-business owners from personal liability. But a funny thing happened. Investors started taking advantage of a tax loophole. And now that loophole needs to be filled. Here's the problem. Sometimes, LLCs are used purely as a way to invest in a piece of commercial real estate. That's fine.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 22, 2013
Conservationists are decrying a move by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to loosen what critics say is already a lax restriction on shark finning, the controversial practice of slicing the fins off and discarding the body at sea. At its spring meeting Tuesday in Alexandria, Va., the fisheries commission voted to allow fishing boats catching smooth dogfish to more than double the ratio of fins to bodies that they bring back to...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.