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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1998
GUTTENBERG, N.J. - Behind a nondescript facade on a quiet street here, huge looms with thousands of needles are noisily working their magic in rhythm, transforming rolls of plain fabric into delicate designs that will one day adorn a fancy nightgown, lacy underwear or a little girl's party dress.Punctuating the dance are the quick movements of a nimble-fingered worker known as a "watcher," who jumps in when a skein of yarn snaps, rethreading the needle and marking the problem spot with tape, even as the machine continues to pulsate.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
In the final seconds of the Morgan State football team's 28-3 thumping of visiting Bowie State (0-2) at Hughes Stadium on Saturday, Lee Hull did his best to avoid what has become a tradition for rookie head coaches: a Gatorade bath. Hull stood on the far end of the Bears (1-2) sideline while the offense marched downfield. He kept his eyes on assistant coaches who tried to distract him while a couple players grabbed the monstrous jug. Eventually, Hull appeared to give in, walking back to the end of the field where the offense was putting the finishing touches on the victory.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Jon Morgan contributed to this story | January 9, 1991
As the General Assembly gathered today for the 387th time in Annapolis, members made their first steps onto a terrain of economic uncertainty.For the 45 newcomers, the highlight in the opening of the 90-day session was the formal swearing-in. Friends and family packed both State House chambers and an overflow crowd filled the lobby to watch the ceremonies on large-screen televisions.But, beyond the festivities and well-wishes of opening day, money worries and other potentially divisive issues loom large over the Assembly.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Emotional about Ray Rice's release and still stinging from a season-opening defeat, the Ravens play AFC North rival Pittsburgh Steelers in two days. The quick turnaround looms for the Ravens following a disappointing game Sunday in which they lost, 23-16, to the Cincinnati Bengals. The potential of falling into an 0-2 hole in the division makes the Steelers game a pivitol one for a team that just dismissed one of its top players. "It was a tough loss," veteran defensive end Chris Canty said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1992
SEWAPURI, India -- As the summer sun labored toward the desiccated plains of northern India, Amarnath Kumar, a straw-thin 10-year-old boy, and three friends crept away from the red adobe hut that had been their prison for 18 months. Across the blistered soil of fallow wheat fields, the boys hurried north, avoiding other people, hurrying into the descending darkness.Behind them, in the adobe enclosure, they left other children -- children bought or stolen from their parents, taken to toil as virtual slaves on the carpet looms of eastern Uttar Pradesh.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
In addition to being the next hurdle in the Ravens' pursuit of their highest playoff seeding, the Kansas City Chiefs represent the last major roadblock in what has become an equally elusive Ravens goal: Ending a season as the NFL's No. 1 defense. Ravens@Chiefs Today, 1 p.m., Ch. 13, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Chiefs by 2 1/2
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2007
Deb May leaned back to survey her work, a neat row of orange and brown wool tightly wrapped around a piece of wood. Did it look right? Would there be enough to make a knot and then warp the other side of the loom? "You have to just trust," said one of her classmates in the Navajo -- or Din? -- weaving class at Common Ground on the Hill. "I'm not that trusting," May said. An experienced weaver, May's uncertainty came from tackling a loom unlike her own -- and an equally unfamiliar technique.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2000
FOR THE SECOND year in a row, Uniontown resident Georgia Groomes has won the prestigious Frances Kahn Award for Wearable Art at the Richmond Craft & Design Show in Richmond, Va. The show was judged by Kenneth R. Trapp, curator-in-charge at Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art in Washington. "It was a pretty nice honor," said Groomes, as she worked at her home studio overlooking farms near Uniontown. "The Richmond show has been going on for 35 years and people [who compete]
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
Some things even money can't buy. So the Volunteers in Medical Engineering will make them.The brains behind F-16 radar, undersea sonar and American torpedoes, these working and retired Westinghouse Electronics engineers devote their spare time to building unique devices that enable the disabled.They motorized a loom for Carole Baylus, a commercial weaver beset with arthritis, so she could continue to earn money. A one-of-a-kind rig, the original maple frame is paired with a little black box that holds a motor connected to a computer.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas | August 18, 1991
The basic process of weaving fabrics, the interlacing ofhorizontal threads over vertical ones, hasn't changed much since the invention of the loom.What's new is the way some textile designers are changing the face of fabric: They are rethinking the way threads are dyed or put together, the design of the pattern and even how a fabric might be embellished -- with everything from rhinestones to embroidery.Color, pattern, weight, texture and touch are what grab our attention when we shop for fabrics, whether in clothing, upholstery, drapery, tablecloths or bed linens.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
This week, youngsters across Maryland will board the "big yellow cheese wagon," as it's sometimes called, and head back to school. And chances are high (aside perhaps from those teary-eyed moms and dads waving good-bye to their kindergartners for the first time), the school bus commute from home to classroom will take place without incident. But the latest survey conducted by the Maryland State Department of Education shows that the students' fate is being tempted on a regular basis by drivers who seem either unaware of the law or unwilling to follow it. Drivers are forbidden to pass a bus in either direction when its stop arm swings out and its lights are flashing, yet that happens all the time.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Before they get a decision in their immigration cases - before they even have a hearing - the tens of thousands of children entering the country illegally will face an increasingly daunting challenge at the heart of a massive backlog in U.S. immigration court: The young immigrants must first find an attorney. Legal groups and immigration experts say the number of lawyers available to represent undocumented children in Maryland and elsewhere is already woefully inadequate to meet the demand - even though many of the most recent border crossers haven't yet begun to enter the court system.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
The season's first tropical storm is expected to brush the mid-Atlantic coast just in time for the Fourth of July, but it is a cold front helping steer the system offshore that could deliver storms and heavy downpours before a cooler, drier holiday Friday. Hot, humid air over the region for the middle of the week is forecast to fuel storm chances through Thursday night. Oppressive levels of moisture in the air prompted Baltimore City officials to declare the summer's first "code red" heat advisory Wednesday.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Environmental advocates say a spending bill set for review in the Senate Appropriations Committee could reopen a fight over whether the Environmental Protection Agency may regulate pollution entering small headwater streams that feed into larger bodies of water, including the Chesapeake Bay. The Obama administration proposed regulations in March that would allow the EPA to enforce Clean Water Act provisions on nearly two million miles...
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
With a weekend deadline looming, a conservative group - shadowed by an equal rights organization - is making a final push in an uphill effort to collect enough signatures to force a ballot referendum on a transgender rights law scheduled to take effect this fall. "The bottom line right now is we're going full speed ahead," said Washington County Del. Neil Parrott, a Republican who chairs MDPetitions.com. As of Friday, the group was thousands of signatures short of its goal. It faced a deadline of midnight Saturday to collect about 18,500 signatures to keep its effort going.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The traditional strength of the Johns Hopkins program is showing up at the right time. With Sunday's 14-8 victory over eighth-seeded Virginia in an NCAA tournament first-round game, the Blue Jays (11-4) have limited six of their last seven opponents to under 10 goals. And with the Cavaliers going scoreless for a 20 minute, 29 second stretch and an 18 minute, 17 second stretch, the defense has shut out opponents for 15 minutes or longer 15 times this season. Coach Dave Pietramala said Johns Hopkins had better defensive showings in a 13-8 win against Albany on April 4 and an 11-6 victory over Maryland on April 12, but said the team improved as the contest developed against Virginia (10-6)
FEATURES
By Beth Dunlop and Beth Dunlop,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 5, 1993
No beach, not even Malibu or Waikiki, is more celebrated in popular lore. College students, on the screen and off, romped on Fort Lauderdale beach, the place "where the boys are." Travis Magee, the fictional detective, lived there aboard a boat at Bahia Mar.Yet over the years, Fort Lauderdale beach flourished and fell, its famous Strip becoming a seedy string of T-shirt shops and bars. Roadways congested, sidewalks littered, the sand smelling of old beer and coconut oil, the beach was held hostage by young revelers -- Spring Break year round.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1992 TPG Communications | May 18, 1992
The adventurer who said he climbed the mountain "because it was there" may have been one of the wisest folks ever. That occurred to me as I pondered three seemingly random, distinctly pedestrian events:* My bulky Random House Dictionary of the English Language lay on my bookshelf. I'd use it when absolutely necessary, perhaps once every two weeks. Then I moved it to a table next to my desk and got into the habit of leaving the dictionary open to the last word I'd looked up. Now I consult it at least once a day -- and invariably end up spending a few minutes studying the etymology of several words unrelated to the one I'd been searching for.* I submitted a very long book manuscript to my publisher.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
In a move that will surprise no one, Loyola Maryland defenseman Joe Fletcher has spent a considerable amount of time watching film of Albany attackman Lyle Thompson, and the Greyhounds senior knows that the tape doesn't lie. He also knows that the tape isn't entirely truthful. It can't capture the full scope of trying to shadow the Great Danes junior, who has already tied UMBC attackman Steve Marohl's single-season NCAA record of 114 points. “That's what makes him, him,” Fletcher said Wednesday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
The Orioles already faced looming roster decisions before they officially placed first baseman Chris Davis on the 15-day disabled list before Sunday's game against the Kansas City Royals. And now the club's roster management is about to get trickier. With Davis on the disabled list and no corresponding move announced Sunday, the Orioles are down one player on their 25-man roster. That's not a concern with Monday's day off. And Orioles manager Buck Showalter said the club expects to have 25 active players for the opening of a two-game series against the Pittsburgh Pirates.
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