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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
The International Longshoremen's Association and the U.S. Maritime Alliance have agreed to meet with a federal mediator before the expiration of the contract extension at midnight on Dec. 29. Talks between the union representing nearly 15,000 dockworkers from Maine to Texas and the alliance representing shipping companies and port operators, stalled last week as both sides traded accusations. The union represents about 1,400 Baltimore longshoremen. The major sticking point is a container royalty payment made to the union and its members based on the weight of cargo.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Longshoremen who went on strike last year at the port of Baltimore claim they are not liable for related losses sustained by their employers, in part because a coastwide labor contract banning such strikes does not apply to them. The claim was made in a federal court filing by Jennifer Stair, an attorney for the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333. The dockworkers union was sued last month by port employers for $3.86 million in damages — the amount arbitrator M. David Vaughn determined the employers lost during the union's three-day strike in October.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
More ships are coming to the port of Baltimore these days, cargo levels are increasing, and the port's even grabbing some business from competitors such as Norfolk, Va., and Philadelphia.But at the International Longshoremen's Association hiring hall in Highlandtown, such promising signs are barely noticeable.Every day before 7 a.m., several hundred longshoremen arrive at the hall, lining up along a yellow cinder-block wall, in front of large letters that designate their seniority. On a typical day, 30 will be called for jobs -- some for only two and three hours -- that they once did every day.While the longshoremen hope that the port's recent upswing will bring more steady work, they're really counting on something far more certain.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
The largest shipping line in the port of Baltimore has threatened to abandon plans for a new cargo hub in the city and begin negotiations with competing ports, blaming local Longshoremen for being "noncompetitive." The Scandinavian shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, which wants to consolidate much of its East Coast cargo in Baltimore, said it can't commit to expanding here if the union of cargo handlers doesn't agree to more flexible work hours and job duties. The largest local of the Longshoremen's union has refused, rejecting a contract change offered by the company this month.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
With difficult contract negotiations ahead in 1996, cargo handlers at the Port of Baltimore have elected a veteran dockworker and former union leader to head the port's largest longshoremen's local.By a 100-vote margin, members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association chose Bill Schonowski in all-day election Wednesday.Mr. Schonowski, who has worked as a longshoreman for nearly 40 years, ousted Matty Capp, a less-experienced union leader who rose to the $70,000-a-year president's post nearly two years ago by filling the unexpired term of Ed Berke.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Once again, longshoremen clerks' leader Richard P. Hughes Jr. has precipitated a strike at Baltimore's port. This one poses enormous dangers for the regional and Maryland economies -- and for the majority of longshoremen in other union locals that disagree with Mr. Hughes' action.State officials called Mr. Hughes' decision a pre-meditated move to win back for his clerks local No. 953 the jobs lost in the last round of talks. The fact that this could prompt a diversion of cargo to other ports, and the loss of countless jobs for dockworkers here, doesn't seem to have entered into his equation.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | December 2, 1990
Negotiators for labor and management in the port of Baltimore talked into the night yesterday in an attempt to reach a contract agreement with the last of five longshoremen's locals.A tentative, four-year agreement with four of the five port locals was reached Friday morning, reducing the threat of a strike, but negotiations with Local 953 of the International Longshoremen's Association, representing dock clerks and checkers, continued Friday night and resumed yesterday at 3 p.m."We're negotiating and we're hopeful," Richard P. Hughes Jr., leader of Local 953, said last night during talks at the Linthicum Heights headquarters of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
A federal lawsuit charging a Baltimore stevedoring company with race discrimination has been dropped for lack of evidence, but some black longshoremen claimed yesterday that favoritism continues to plague the port.The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) said yesterday that it gave up on the lawsuit it had filed last year, alleging that the Ceres Corp. was giving less work to three gangs of black longshoremen than to gangs made up predominantly of white workers.Longshoremen, who move cargo on and off ships, are organized into "gangs" of 17 workers each.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 19, 1991
Seven months into a four-year contract, longshoremen at the Port of Baltimore are accusing management of giving preferential treatment to some work gangs.Officials of International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 took their grievance this week to a federal arbitrator. They allege that three stevedoring companies are not keeping their promise in the contract to make "every effort" to give longshoremen enough hours to receive Guaranteed Annual Income benefits.Under the contract adopted by the locals in December, each longshoreman must work at least 200 hours in two of the last three years in order to receive the GAI money.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Unionized longshoremen who work the docks at the port of Baltimore voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to reject a contract proposal from their employers, once again extending a labor standoff that has destabilized the state's primary trade hub for months. They did so with the backing of national labor officials, who warned that approval of the contract would mean millions of dollars pulled from the union's - and local longshoremen's - pockets. Others fear that continuing to work without a contract could have a more dire effect: ratcheting up concerns of labor instability among port customers and causing cargo to be diverted.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Members of a longshoremen's union at odds with port of Baltimore employers will vote next week on whether to accept the employers' "best and final" contract offer. The contract has been on the table for weeks, and union members have disagreed over whether to sign it. The secret ballot vote, scheduled for Feb. 11, has the potential to end an extended stalemate between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents employers.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
A federal arbitrator has ordered a local longshoremen's union to pay nearly $4 million in damages after a labor strike in October led to lost revenue at the port of Baltimore. The damages awarded Friday provide the first estimate for how costly the strike was to the port's employers. They do not include additional losses by businesses — such as trucking outfits — that do not hold contracts with the longshoremen but rely on port cargo for work. Riker "Rocky" McKenzie, president of the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, confirmed the ruling Tuesday, saying it orders the union to pay about $3.8 million.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Discord has erupted within the longshoremen's union at the heart of the labor dispute at the port of Baltimore, with some members calling for an end to the union's standoff with port employers and others promising to push on. The dissension is growing as the standoff begins to affect trade. Some customers have diverted cargo, fearing a second labor disruption in four months, a development some longshoreman believe portends more trouble for the business they depend on for survival.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Members of a local longshoremen union that went on strike in October, crippling the port of Baltimore for three days, will meet Monday to discuss a new contract offer from the port's employers. The deadline for a new deal between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents the employers, is Jan. 17. That's when a "cooling-off" period ordered by an arbitrator to stop the October strike and restart port operations comes to an end. The outcome of the Local 333 meeting, where a vote on the proposed contract could take place, will have huge implications for the port - which has worked to protect its reputation as a dependable cargo handler after the last work stoppage angered customers.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Striking longshoremen at the port of Baltimore worked at least one cruise ship Thursday as their stoppage closed the port's cargo terminals for a second day. Royal Caribbean International's Grandeur of the Seas arrived for its regular sailing, disgorging passengers and picking up more for an eight-night cruise to New England and Canada. Despite the strike by International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, union dockworkers handled luggage and performed other tasks Thursday for the big cruise ship, tied up at the Cruise Maryland terminal in Locust Point.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush intervened yesterday in the 11-day shutdown of 29 West Coast ports, successfully seeking a court order to halt the employers' lockout of 10,500 longshoremen because the operation of the ports is "vital to our economy and to our military." Judge William Alsup of U.S. District Court in San Francisco issued a temporary injunction last night ordering longshoremen to report to work immediately. In seeking to suspend the shutdown for 80 days, Bush became the first president to invoke the Taft-Hartley Act's emergency provisions since President Nixon sought to stop a longshoremen's strike in 1971.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | December 3, 2006
Theresa Harden can still drive tractors all day, but at 61 years old, the longshoreman has a tough time crawling on her hands and knees in the belly of a cargo ship, a task that port of Baltimore workers do to help secure freight. "I can't do it," she said recently. For many years, Harden and other workers who were older, weaker or battered from years on the job relied on their seniority at Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Work rules allowed them a day's pay for jobs they could comfortably do. But many workers say such rules have been eroded in the nearly 18 months since their New York-based union stepped into local affairs, pointing to financial and other irregularities.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
A strike by hundreds of longshoremen who work the port of Baltimore's docks idled one of the region's big economic engines. Launched early Wednesday morning, the strike shut down all of the port's public marine terminals, and its effects rippled out from the docks where ship crews waited for their vessels to be unloaded, to the truckers who haul cargo and cars from the port, to the warehouses that unload consumer goods. It started after members of the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 voted Tuesday night to reject a local contract with the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represent the port's employers of longshoremen.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun and By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Longshoremen and the management of East Coast and Gulf ports reached a tentative agreement on a new master contract late Friday night, averting a threatened walkout next week. The deal between the International Longshoremen's Association, which represents 14,500 workers, and the U.S. Maritime Alliance that negotiates for 15 ports and shipping companies is still subject to ratification by both sides and to agreements between local unions and port managers. Details were not released.
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