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Longitude

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SPORTS
November 19, 1997
Leg 2, Day 12: Cape Town to FremantlePos. -- 1Pts. at stake for Leg 2** -- 113Boat -- Swedish MatchDistance to leader* --Distance to leg finish* -- 1445.9Latitude -- 47.22SLongitude -- 91.33EPos. -- 2Pts. at stake for Leg 2** -- 98Boat -- Innov. KvaernerDistance to leader* -- 306.2Distance to leg finish* -- 1752.1Latitude -- 48.39SLongitude -- 83.56EPos. -- 3Pts. at stake for Leg 2** -- 85Boat -- ToshibaDistance to leader* -- 421.4Distance to leg finish* -- 1867.3Latitude -- 50.11SLongitude -- 81.44EPos.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance , frank.roylance@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
L eonard of Pikesville writes: "For as long as I can remember, Baltimore's earliest sunset has always been 4:44 p.m., starting around Thanksgiving. Now I see everywhere it's 4:43 p.m. What has changed?" Nothing, really. Officially, it was 4:43 p.m. EST on Dec. 7. But it will vary with the latitude, and especially the longitude your sources use for "Baltimore." The earliest sunset in Essex was at 4:42 p.m. In Catonsville, it was at 4:44 p.m.
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NEWS
January 12, 1997
A. S. Byatt's "Babel Tower." I love Byatt, she's a great writer. Would I recommend this to friends? Absolutely.I'm also reading Reynolds Price's "Gospels." It's an interpretation of three of the gospels. It's a quite lovely book.And since I have a habit of reading too much at once, I'm alsoreading "Longitude." by Dana Sobel. It's a marvelous little book. It's about the English clockmaker who correctly realized that we needed the concept of longitude. It's not technical at all, just a marvelous story.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2003
Pour me somethin' tall and strong Make it a hurricane before I go insane It's only half-past 12 but I don't care It's 5 o'clock somewhere.- "It's Five O'Clock Some- where," words by Jim "Moose" Brown, Don Rollins In these devil-may-care lyrics of their No. 1 country-music hit, Alan Jackson and Jimmy Buffett suggest that even if it's just past noon where they are, it must be happy hour somewhere in the world. Maybe it's cock-eyed optimism, but can that claim really be true? Or have the emperor of Margaritaville and his sidekick been sucking too many tequila-soaked limes?
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
Joe Gallagher, of Baltimore, asks: "When I am in Baltimore, and watching the sun set, where in the world is that same sun rising?" At the equinoxes, sunrise and sunset occur 180 degrees of longitude apart. Our setting sun is rising near Jin chang, in north central China. Earth's seasonal tilt changes the geometry: In summer our setting sun is rising over the Iran/Afghanistan border. In winter, it's rising on Japan.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2003
Pour me somethin' tall and strong Make it a hurricane before I go insane It's only half-past 12 but I don't care It's 5 o'clock somewhere.- "It's Five O'Clock Some- where," words by Jim "Moose" Brown, Don Rollins In these devil-may-care lyrics of their No. 1 country-music hit, Alan Jackson and Jimmy Buffett suggest that even if it's just past noon where they are, it must be happy hour somewhere in the world. Maybe it's cock-eyed optimism, but can that claim really be true? Or have the emperor of Margaritaville and his sidekick been sucking too many tequila-soaked limes?
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | September 8, 1991
Greenwich, England. - This is where the day begins.The world is divided East from West by the Prime Meridian of 0 degrees longitude which runs through the center of the old Royal Observatory in Flamsteed House placed on this green hill in Greenwich Park in 1675 by King Charles II.It is the sun's starting point each day, the line from which the nations of the world have reckoned longitude since 1884.The meridian is, of course, an abstract thing, represented by a brass strip embedded in the ground.
NEWS
By Philip A. Lieberman | January 5, 1994
GROWING up in the 1950s, I accompanied my mother on weekly treks to the local A&P. It was an old store, with wooden floors and globe light fixtures. By today's standards, it would barely qualify as a supermarket.But unlike today's Muzak-filled, cinder-block behemoths, that A&P had character. Even the large metal sign over the front door displayed an unmistakable emblem: a perfect circle with a puffed-up "A" and "P" neatly inscribed within.On the way home, we'd sometimes stop at the Mobil filling station, where a winged Pegasus adorned an acorn-shaped sign.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Stahley | August 14, 2002
AMERICANS TEND to think of interstate highways as multilane necessities having no true beginning or end. They have become the national equivalent of latitude and longitude - horizontal and vertical bands crosshatching the map. While it is abundantly clear that Interstate 95 originates near the northernmost tip of Maine and terminates in Miami, anyone who has driven on it between Baltimore and Washington has tasted the meaning of the word eternity....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Matthews and By Mark Matthews,Sun Staff | September 1, 2002
Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, by Thomas L. Friedman. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 400 pages. $26. Few writers have a better grasp than Thomas L. Friedman of the dimensions of America's war on terrorism. A student of the Middle East since the 1970s, he made his mark in journalism reporting from Lebanon. As the foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times, he enjoys access to a number of Mideast leaders and a range of contacts among the region's intellectuals, business professionals and journalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Matthews and By Mark Matthews,Sun Staff | September 1, 2002
Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, by Thomas L. Friedman. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 400 pages. $26. Few writers have a better grasp than Thomas L. Friedman of the dimensions of America's war on terrorism. A student of the Middle East since the 1970s, he made his mark in journalism reporting from Lebanon. As the foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times, he enjoys access to a number of Mideast leaders and a range of contacts among the region's intellectuals, business professionals and journalists.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Stahley | August 14, 2002
AMERICANS TEND to think of interstate highways as multilane necessities having no true beginning or end. They have become the national equivalent of latitude and longitude - horizontal and vertical bands crosshatching the map. While it is abundantly clear that Interstate 95 originates near the northernmost tip of Maine and terminates in Miami, anyone who has driven on it between Baltimore and Washington has tasted the meaning of the word eternity....
SPORTS
November 19, 1997
Leg 2, Day 12: Cape Town to FremantlePos. -- 1Pts. at stake for Leg 2** -- 113Boat -- Swedish MatchDistance to leader* --Distance to leg finish* -- 1445.9Latitude -- 47.22SLongitude -- 91.33EPos. -- 2Pts. at stake for Leg 2** -- 98Boat -- Innov. KvaernerDistance to leader* -- 306.2Distance to leg finish* -- 1752.1Latitude -- 48.39SLongitude -- 83.56EPos. -- 3Pts. at stake for Leg 2** -- 85Boat -- ToshibaDistance to leader* -- 421.4Distance to leg finish* -- 1867.3Latitude -- 50.11SLongitude -- 81.44EPos.
NEWS
January 12, 1997
A. S. Byatt's "Babel Tower." I love Byatt, she's a great writer. Would I recommend this to friends? Absolutely.I'm also reading Reynolds Price's "Gospels." It's an interpretation of three of the gospels. It's a quite lovely book.And since I have a habit of reading too much at once, I'm alsoreading "Longitude." by Dana Sobel. It's a marvelous little book. It's about the English clockmaker who correctly realized that we needed the concept of longitude. It's not technical at all, just a marvelous story.
NEWS
By Philip A. Lieberman | January 5, 1994
GROWING up in the 1950s, I accompanied my mother on weekly treks to the local A&P. It was an old store, with wooden floors and globe light fixtures. By today's standards, it would barely qualify as a supermarket.But unlike today's Muzak-filled, cinder-block behemoths, that A&P had character. Even the large metal sign over the front door displayed an unmistakable emblem: a perfect circle with a puffed-up "A" and "P" neatly inscribed within.On the way home, we'd sometimes stop at the Mobil filling station, where a winged Pegasus adorned an acorn-shaped sign.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | September 8, 1991
Greenwich, England. - This is where the day begins.The world is divided East from West by the Prime Meridian of 0 degrees longitude which runs through the center of the old Royal Observatory in Flamsteed House placed on this green hill in Greenwich Park in 1675 by King Charles II.It is the sun's starting point each day, the line from which the nations of the world have reckoned longitude since 1884.The meridian is, of course, an abstract thing, represented by a brass strip embedded in the ground.
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