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By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Staff Writer | August 1, 1992
SANDY SPRING -- A strong summer thunderstorm swept through Montgomery County yesterday, dampening the Cycle Across Maryland Century Day, just one day before the tour will end.The squall reached Sherwood High School around 5 p.m. and drove participants, tour organizers and hospitality table people into the school with the heavy downpour.The storm also left several cyclists to battle both the elements and the longest day of cycling for the tour.Tour organizers scambled their "Sag Cars" to patrol the cycling route for stranded participants.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Record and The Aegis | December 12, 2013
Sunrise on this Friday, a week and a day before the shortest day of the year, was at 7:18 a.m. and the time of the day's sun set is 4:44 p.m., which means out of this 24 hour span, only 9 hours, 26 minutes and 3 seconds would be considered daytime. By Dec. 21, the length of the day will have contracted by about another two minutes. Contrast this with June 21, 2014, the first day of summer in the coming year and the longest day of the year, which is predicted to last just shy of 15 hours.
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NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | June 25, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- The longest day of the year 1995 began to DTC grow light well before the sun appeared at 5:40, exactly on schedule. By sunrise, lots of farm activity was already well under way.Urban acquaintances of mine, perhaps picturing a man on a tractor plowing an endless furrow toward a Midwestern horizon, often seem to have an idea that farm life and farm work are both fundamentally solitary. That's an illusion.Even in a highly mechanized era, there are times of the year when most farms still need people, sometimes quite a few of them.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
Happy first day of summer. It officially arrives on the East Coast at 1:16 p.m. That means you have official permission to take a trip to the beach. No need for excuses or guilt. Summer = beach, no questions asked. (If you spend summer at your desk like I probably will, there's something seriously wrong in your life. Or you need to pay bills.) To welcome summer, Assateague Island National Seashore offers free admission today for both Maryland and Virginia portions. Wheee...
NEWS
By Geoffrey Fielding | June 6, 1994
THE LONGEST DAY. By Cornelius Ryan. Touchstone Books. 350 pages. $11 paperback.IT WAS Field Marshal Erwin Rommel who predicted that D-Day, when the Allies landed in Normandy 50 years ago today, would be "the longest day." It was Cornelius Ryan who used that for the title of his 1959 best-seller, an account of those perilous 24 hours when American, British, Canadian and French troops stormed ashore on the beaches of Normandy.This, the largest water-borne invasion in history, and one not likely to be repeated because of vast changes in the technology of warfare, set Europe free from four years of Nazi domination.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
Happy first day of summer. It officially arrives on the East Coast at 1:16 p.m. That means you have official permission to take a trip to the beach. No need for excuses or guilt. Summer = beach, no questions asked. (If you spend summer at your desk like I probably will, there's something seriously wrong in your life. Or you need to pay bills.) To welcome summer, Assateague Island National Seashore offers free admission today for both Maryland and Virginia portions. Wheee...
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 16, 1996
From The Sun June 16-22, 1846* June 16: Yesterday afternoon, Captain Peter W. Chaille, of the schooner Express, from Snowhill, Worcester County, suddenly died in this city.* June 17: We were informed yesterday of the most extraordinary freak of nature we have ever had occasion to record, being the birth of a living child with the heart outside of the chest.From The Sun June 16-22, 1896* June 16: A contract was awarded yesterday by Gen. Manager Green, of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia for twenty locomotives.
NEWS
By Bruce Clayton | June 5, 1994
Is it too much to say that the fate of the Western world hung in the balance on D-Day, June 6, 1944? Think of the possible consequences had the massive cross-Channel Allied attack on the shores of Normandy failed. Even after capturing the beaches and establishing a toehold on the Continent, it took the Allies almost another year of hard fighting to kick the Nazis out of France and conquer Hitler's Germany.Failure 50 years ago -- and it could have happened -- would have emboldened Hitler. The myth of his invincibility would have soared.
NEWS
Editorial from The Record and The Aegis | December 12, 2013
Sunrise on this Friday, a week and a day before the shortest day of the year, was at 7:18 a.m. and the time of the day's sun set is 4:44 p.m., which means out of this 24 hour span, only 9 hours, 26 minutes and 3 seconds would be considered daytime. By Dec. 21, the length of the day will have contracted by about another two minutes. Contrast this with June 21, 2014, the first day of summer in the coming year and the longest day of the year, which is predicted to last just shy of 15 hours.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 2002
STE.-MERE-EGLISE, France - D-Day is recalled in a rusty water pump Raymond Paris used to fight a farmhouse fire as he watched Europe's liberators float from the night sky. It's an embroidered handkerchief an American soldier handed to the first French girl he met, Jeanne Pentecote. And it's a scarred chestnut tree in the front courtyard of Suzanne Duchemin's chateau, where wounded were tended and refugees slept beneath the stars. "I think about D-Day a lot," said Duchemin, an 80-year-old with an encyclopedic knowledge of a battle she survived.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
Watching the TD Bank International Cycling Championship, set for Sunday in Philadelphia, can have a strange effect on people. The 156-mile course is the longest one-day race in the nation and typically attracts between 200,000 and 300,000 spectators. The highlight is the famous "Manayunk Wall," a half-mile monster of a hill with a grade of 17 percent, which bicyclists have to power up 10 times during the course of the competition. Most people witness this spectacle of human endurance and marvel at the incredible speed, athleticism and strategy of the cyclists.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 2002
STE.-MERE-EGLISE, France - D-Day is recalled in a rusty water pump Raymond Paris used to fight a farmhouse fire as he watched Europe's liberators float from the night sky. It's an embroidered handkerchief an American soldier handed to the first French girl he met, Jeanne Pentecote. And it's a scarred chestnut tree in the front courtyard of Suzanne Duchemin's chateau, where wounded were tended and refugees slept beneath the stars. "I think about D-Day a lot," said Duchemin, an 80-year-old with an encyclopedic knowledge of a battle she survived.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
The man never talked much anyway, the boy knew, and his mom told him that when his dad got back from his tour of duty in World War II, he spoke even less. That didn't bother young Joe Balkoski so much as leave him in a state of puzzlement. "When a full sentence came out of my father's mouth, it was an occasion," says Balkoski today. "He was just a quiet, reserved guy. You rarely knew what he was thinking." Maybe that's why it made such an impact on Joe - at age 8, in 1962 - when Dad corralled him one day in their New York City apartment to take him to the movies.
SPORTS
By Tricia Rongstad and Tricia Rongstad,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2000
TEMPE, Ariz. - The Arizona Cardinals are having a record-breaking season. But they're breaking all the wrong records. With two games remaining, including tomorrow's against the Ravens, Cardinals return man MarTay Jenkins has set NFL marks for kickoffs in a season (73), kickoff return yardage in a season (1,964) and combined punt and kickoff return yardage in a season (1,965). But Jenkins has reached the end zone only once, and the Cardinals (3-11) have one of the league's most futile offenses.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 2, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - What happens when an Australian serving machine named Mark Philippoussis meets a Dutch brick wall named Sjeng Schalken? The longest one-day match - by time - in open-era Wimbledon history. Philippoussis defeated Schalken, 4-6, 6-3, 6-7 (7-9), 7-6 (7-4), 20-18, yesterday in an epic third-round encounter that took 5 hours, 5 minutes to complete. "Those are the kind of matches that I'm proud of," Philippoussis said. "That's why you play tennis." Only the 1969 Pancho Gonzales-Charles Pasarell match was longer - 5 hours, 12 minutes - and that took two days for Gonzales to win. The 83 games Philippoussis and Schalken played were the most in a match at Wimbledon since 1970, before the tie-breaker was introduced.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 1998
Weather has been known to affect the theater, especially outdoor dramas. But it's not often that a play is dependent on the Earth's orbit.But it happens today in Toronto, where the York cycle of English mystery plays will be enacted on the campus of the University of Toronto. The date was chosen because it's the day of the vernal equinox: Midsummer Day, the longest of the year.A dozen students of Towson University will offer their contribution to the York cycle, starting almost at daybreak.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
The man never talked much anyway, the boy knew, and his mom told him that when his dad got back from his tour of duty in World War II, he spoke even less. That didn't bother young Joe Balkoski so much as leave him in a state of puzzlement. "When a full sentence came out of my father's mouth, it was an occasion," says Balkoski today. "He was just a quiet, reserved guy. You rarely knew what he was thinking." Maybe that's why it made such an impact on Joe - at age 8, in 1962 - when Dad corralled him one day in their New York City apartment to take him to the movies.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
For all the clamor around Ken Griffey's locker after yesterday's Gatorade Home Run Derby at the All-Star workout, you'd have thought he'd won something.Griffey did become the first player to hit the B&O warehouse behind right field at Camden Yards on the fly with a batted ball, but he didn't win the competition.That distinction went to Juan Gonzalez, who may have done structural damage to the joint, slugging the two longest blasts in Oriole Park history to beat Griffey in two extra sessions.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 16, 1996
From The Sun June 16-22, 1846* June 16: Yesterday afternoon, Captain Peter W. Chaille, of the schooner Express, from Snowhill, Worcester County, suddenly died in this city.* June 17: We were informed yesterday of the most extraordinary freak of nature we have ever had occasion to record, being the birth of a living child with the heart outside of the chest.From The Sun June 16-22, 1896* June 16: A contract was awarded yesterday by Gen. Manager Green, of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia for twenty locomotives.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | June 25, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- The longest day of the year 1995 began to DTC grow light well before the sun appeared at 5:40, exactly on schedule. By sunrise, lots of farm activity was already well under way.Urban acquaintances of mine, perhaps picturing a man on a tractor plowing an endless furrow toward a Midwestern horizon, often seem to have an idea that farm life and farm work are both fundamentally solitary. That's an illusion.Even in a highly mechanized era, there are times of the year when most farms still need people, sometimes quite a few of them.
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