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By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
During the hot real estate market, this Roland Park brick Colonial probably never would have seen an open house. "One and a half to two years ago, this house would have had multiple contracts within three to five days," said Jim Mikula of the Fells Point office of Long & Foster Real Estate, who, with his partner, is listing the property with a $419,900 price tag. "We probably would have had a broker's open on Wednesday, and at that point you basically would...
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
With more than a dozen new locations and longer hours, the State Board of Elections will begin Maryland's most extensive early voting period yet on Thursday. Early voting will be available at 63 locations - including at least one in every county - from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily through June 19. The early voting period opens for the third time in the state's history, following a series of legislative hurdles and legal battles over constitutional questions and concerns that the system invites fraud and disproportionately favors Democrats.
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NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | June 20, 2000
Research by two University of Washington economists strongly suggests that men not only work longer hours after the birth of a child, they work harder still if that child is a son. The researchers are stumped to explain why and have witnessed some serious head-scratching from fellow economists. "Their response has been, `I love my daughter as much as I love my son,'" said Shelly Lundberg, a UW economics professor who conducted the research with fellow UW economist Elaina Rose. Lundberg and Rose's findings do not suggest that hard-working fathers love a son more than a daughter, said Lundberg, the study's principal investigator.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Baltimore fire union president Rick Hoffman blasted the city administration Tuesday for not giving firefighters the 2 percent raises all other city union employees will get, after months of staying silent on the issue amid ongoing arbitration. Hoffman made note of the city's recent violent crime wave as evidence that firefighters deserve a raise, saying that members of the Fire Department, who also handle medical calls, are the ones who take shooting victims to the hospital and wash the blood off the street after the police leave.
NEWS
July 10, 1991
A judge has ruled that Gov. William Donald Schaefer has the authority to order state employees to work 40 hours a week. Schaefer mandated the longer workweek in February to save money. About half of the state's 80,000 employees work 35 1/2 hours a week under a 1942 personnel policy. Lawyers for two unions representing thousands of state workers argue that Schaefer violated their contracts by calling for longer hours without compensation.The Evening Sun wants to know what you think about state workers working a 40-hour week, and whether they should be compensated for the difference.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 13, 1991
NEW YORK -- Some West Coast members of the New York Stock Exchange are circulating a petition to stop the exchange's plan to begin trading a half-hour earlier, at 9 a.m. EDT.The opponents say the earlier opening will raise costs without increasing revenue. They also say it will place an unfair burden on West Coast firms, already struggling to get staffs ready by 6:30 a.m. Pacific time, the current opening."On a practical basis, you will end up increasing costs and hurting the smaller firms," said Seth J. Gersch, chief operating officer of Montgomery Securities Inc., a San Francisco brokerage firm that is leading the petition drive.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Baltimore fire union president Rick Hoffman blasted the city administration Tuesday for not giving firefighters the 2 percent raises all other city union employees will get, after months of staying silent on the issue amid ongoing arbitration. Hoffman made note of the city's recent violent crime wave as evidence that firefighters deserve a raise, saying that members of the Fire Department, who also handle medical calls, are the ones who take shooting victims to the hospital and wash the blood off the street after the police leave.
NEWS
July 5, 1991
As the current lawsuit over a 40-hour state workweek demonstrates, the kind of Band-Aid budgeting practiced by Governor Schaefer and the General Assembly at the last session works far better in theory than it does in practice.In theory, the state would require about half its 80,000 employees to work 4 1/2 extra hours a week as part of a plan to help keep Maryland afloat in the face of a shrinking state budget, without imposing substantial tax increases. In reality, however, the mandate requires that a group of people work what amounts to an extra 29 days, or five extra workweeks, a year -- without additional compensation.
NEWS
December 28, 2008
Last week, safety advocates petitioned the federal government to reconsider a recent decision to allow truckers to work longer hours. The new regulations deserve more than reconsideration; they ought to be completely dismissed as a regrettable four-year experiment by the Bush administration. Truckers used to be limited to driving no more than 10 hours straight, but in 2004, the industry successfully lobbied to have them expanded on an interim basis to 11 hours. Has the 11th hour made the roads more dangerous?
NEWS
January 24, 1991
Faced with an 18-month shortfall of $650 million, Gov. William Donald Schaefer had two choices: fire thousands of state workers or impose a pay freeze and longer hours on Maryland's public work force. Mr. Schaefer chose the latter option but still has received stinging criticism.During the 1980s, state workers came to expect healthy cost-of-living raises, improved benefits and a shorter work week than in the private sector. Many believed a pay raise was assured each year.They were wrong. In recessionary times, payroll costs must fall.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The Rawlings-Blake administration and Baltimore's fire unions are battling over the city's proposal to require firefighters to work longer hours — 24 hours straight, every three days. The mayor says the move — which mirrors staffing trends in other large U.S. cities — will save millions for cash-strapped Baltimore while giving its 1,300 firefighters a huge pay raise by creating a longer work week. The fire unions, however, say the move would represent a cut to their hourly pay and is unfair to employees who have built their lives around a work schedule that's been in place for 20 years.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
With its branches dark for more hours than most of those in neighboring counties, Anne Arundel County library officials want to extend the hours that all local libraries are open. The pitch for longer hours at the 15 library locations is expected to come as part of the library system's budget request for the coming fiscal year, which begins next July. And although the county is only one-third of the way into the current budget year, government agencies have begun looking ahead. "The hours is really our big push for this coming year," said Hampton "Skip" Auld, the library system's administrator.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Ten city recreation centers in areas with "high concentrations of at-risk youth" will remain open for extended hours throughout the summer to provide a haven for children. The governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention is funding the extended hours, said Shaun Adamec, a spokesman for Gov. Martin O'Malley. O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will announce the locations of the recreation centers at a news conference this afternoon. The city recently extended hours for swimming pools for Wednesday and today to help residents cope with the heat wave.
NEWS
December 28, 2008
Last week, safety advocates petitioned the federal government to reconsider a recent decision to allow truckers to work longer hours. The new regulations deserve more than reconsideration; they ought to be completely dismissed as a regrettable four-year experiment by the Bush administration. Truckers used to be limited to driving no more than 10 hours straight, but in 2004, the industry successfully lobbied to have them expanded on an interim basis to 11 hours. Has the 11th hour made the roads more dangerous?
NEWS
May 11, 2008
Anne Arundel County school teachers rejected higher pay in favor of a more manageable workweek by a nearly 2-to-1 margin in a union vote last week. More than 170 teachers voted on a measure last Wednesday that would have increased their pay by 6 percent but also required them to work 38 1/2 hours a week. Teachers overwhelmingly defeated the measure amid concerns that the extra pay was not worth the additional workload, said Tim Mennuti, president of the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
During the hot real estate market, this Roland Park brick Colonial probably never would have seen an open house. "One and a half to two years ago, this house would have had multiple contracts within three to five days," said Jim Mikula of the Fells Point office of Long & Foster Real Estate, who, with his partner, is listing the property with a $419,900 price tag. "We probably would have had a broker's open on Wednesday, and at that point you basically would...
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1997
Everything from paying water bills to adopting puppies will be more convenient starting tomorrow as Howard County offices begin staying open an hour longer, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.The longer hours -- they were 8: 30 a.m. to 4: 30 p.m. -- come from a personnel overhaul initiated by County Executive Charles I. Ecker.The new system makes a 40-hour workweek standard for full-time county employees. Before, more than one-third had 35-hour weeks. Those making the change will be paid for the extra five hours each week.
NEWS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
When Donny Allison arrives for work each morning, he takes the first hour to check e-mails and voice mails and to plan his day - and his boss knows not to talk to him until after 10 a.m. When he goes home at night, Allison always takes about 30 minutes to unwind before jumping into family life. "When I go home, my wife knows just to give me time so I can read and just calm down," said Allison, who works in sales for Quick Connect Communications Inc., an Owings Mills telephone company.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2004
When Kerry Lane reports to Burleigh Manor Middle School today, it will signal the beginning of a hectic week for her and other teachers as they prepare for their students' arrivals. Howard County public schools' 6,770 teachers and staff members return a week before the first day of school for training, meetings and other tasks, including setting up their classrooms. "It's endless," said Lane, who teaches sixth- and eighth-grade reading. "You just make sure you're ready to go and your materials are ready to go and your classroom is ready.
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