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By GREGORY D. FOSTER | April 26, 2006
The American public is being lulled into a false sense of insecurity. And insecurity, constructed or real, is what gives those in power - our purported protectors - their self-righteous aura of indispensability. President Bush; Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld; the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Peter Pace; the head of the U.S. Central Command, Gen. John P. Abizaid; and the recently released Quadrennial Defense Review, among other authoritative purveyors of received wisdom, all warn us that we're embroiled in - and destined to be further subjected to - what is to be known as a Long War. It would be one thing if such semantic legerdemain reflected revelatory strategic insight or a more sophisticated appreciation of the intrinsic nature of postmodern conflicts and enemies.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
The author Ishmael Beah grew up listening to his grandmother tell folk tales that explained, among other things, why a spider has a narrow waist. He quickly realized that beneath the whimsy were hidden life lessons he was expected to master. "I would [sit] around the fire every evening and ask my grandmother what the stories meant, and she would refuse to tell me," Beah said. "The stories were like medicine. I was supposed to find the meanings for myself and let them strengthen me. " The boy needed all the strengthening he could get when he was kidnapped at age 13, drafted as a child soldier into Sierra Leone's civil war, and forced to commit atrocities.
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NEWS
June 1, 2010
Reading this weekend's Sunpapers, which featured the military loved ones we lost this year and those we have lost in this long war, for which no end is yet in sight, was so sad. Even more the thought that family and friends of those lost or severely injured may feel they are being forgotten in these difficult times in our country saddened me even more. Please do what you can in future articles to assure them that is not so. I joined hundreds of Marylanders Monday at the memorial service at Dulaney Memorial Gardens to honor and remember them and greet the many veterans of other wars who were also there.
NEWS
By Neill Franklin | June 17, 2013
Thirteen years ago, Cpl. Ed Toatley was working undercover for the Maryland State Police when he was murdered during a botched drug deal in Washington, D.C. Ed was a close friend of mine, and his tragic death Oct. 30, 2000, began my quest to end America's longest war, the failed war on drugs. That quest led me to the newly formed Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), an international nonprofit organization for law enforcement professionals embarking on journeys similar to mine, where I have served as executive director for the past three years.
NEWS
January 13, 1991
Just how long the current recession will last depends in vast measure on how long the crisis in the Persian Gulf endures. A long war or a long standoff would mean continuing uncertainty for American business and industry, and uncertainty means expansiownturn shake out.Such is the prevailing sentiment among economists. It is a formula so neat and pat that its uniqueness might be overlooked. For most of this century, prosperity has accompanied long wars in the American experience. World War I, World War II and Vietnam were periods of robust industrial expansion and rising living standards.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - A month into the war in Afghanistan, the hand-wringing has already begun over how long this might last. Let's all take a deep breath and repeat after me: Give war a chance. This is Afghanistan we're talking about. Check the map. It's far away. I have no doubt, for now, that the Bush team has a military strategy for winning a long war. I do worry, though, whether it has a public relations strategy for sustaining a long war. Over time, Arab and Muslim public opinion will matter.
NEWS
By Allan Gerson and Marc Ginsberg | June 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - "And the war came," Abraham Lincoln wrote, even though "both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war ... and the other would accept war." George W. Bush may soon be called upon to make a similar statement if the fragile cease-fire between Israelis and Palestinians breaks down and leads to an expanded Israeli-Palestinian conflict that would threaten to engulf the entire Middle East. It would be far better if he were to say who is making war and who is accepting war in time to avert a war. To announce now which side America will support and which side it will condemn before Israel is left with no alternative but to forcefully respond to another act of Palestinian-sponsored terrorism is not an act of diplomatic foolhardiness; it is an act of diplomatic vision and courage.
NEWS
November 30, 2001
REGARDLESS of whether Kandahar falls soon by negotiation or later after fearful street-fighting, some objectives of the war in Afghanistan are coming into view. The Taliban is removed as the governing authority. Al-Qaida is on the run. Osama bin Laden may be found soon, or never. But the notion of a quick triumph is illusory. Fortified villages like Spin Boldak and such cave warren fortresses as Tora Bora may hold out for a long time. Neither will social peace come soon. The dominant position of the Northern Alliance on the ground bodes ill for sharing power gracefully with fragmented rivals.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | June 6, 1995
ON AUG. 12, 1945, there was a wire service news report -- which turned out to be false -- that Japan had surrendered, ending war in the Pacific theater. Reeling from years of sacrifices for the war effort, Baltimoreans rushed to downtown streets after hearing the unconfirmed report and began celebrating.It wasn't until Aug. 14 that President Harry Truman officially announced Japan's surrender from the White House.But, in Baltimore, within hours of the bogus report on Aug. 12, thousands of people flocked to the downtown area.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | August 30, 1995
We are growing old on this jungle island. It is August 1945 and some of us have been languishing here for 17 months, and a few of these haven't seen their families for, literally, years. Back in May we were envious of the celebrations on the home front of the victory in Europe. Hey, the war isn't over. We're still here out here in the Pacific.Then the A-bombs are dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, incinerating tens of thousands of Japanese, and the long, long war is unexpectedly, unbelievably, hysterically over.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 10, 2012
Last month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation released its accounting of all arrests made by law enforcement agencies across the fruited plain. Cops and federal agents made 12,408,899 arrests in the USA in 2011. No wonder we're known around the world as Incarceration Nation. Let's walk through the breakdown of that big number: •Of the total, 534,704 arrests were for violent crimes, and that number was down about 5 percent from 2010. •Driving under the influence accounted for 1.21 million arrests.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Courtney Senini knew something was amiss when aides started dashing in and out of the classroom, passing messages to the admirals and generals who taught her leadership seminar at the U.S. Naval Academy. Finally, one of the aides stood before the room of seniors and in a big, puffy voice, said the words that would change their lives: "Ladies and gentlemen, the United States is under attack. " The room fell silent. An attack on American soil seemed inconceivable when Senini and her classmates entered the academy in 1998.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
Reading this weekend's Sunpapers, which featured the military loved ones we lost this year and those we have lost in this long war, for which no end is yet in sight, was so sad. Even more the thought that family and friends of those lost or severely injured may feel they are being forgotten in these difficult times in our country saddened me even more. Please do what you can in future articles to assure them that is not so. I joined hundreds of Marylanders Monday at the memorial service at Dulaney Memorial Gardens to honor and remember them and greet the many veterans of other wars who were also there.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | November 27, 2009
Football fans have been quite taken by a recurring segment on ESPN's "NFL Countdown Show" called "C'mon man." Inspired by former wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson, botched plays from NFL action are highlighted, with the players involved being targeted for the "C'mon man" admonition. It's funny stuff. But when President Barack Obama, after weeks of indecision, prepares to tell the nation in a prime time address that tens of thousands of more troops are going to be sent into the endless war in Afghanistan, it's not so funny.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 24, 2006
President Bush said Monday that the Iraq war is "straining the psyche of our country." What country is he talking about? The United States? If that's what the president thinks, he ought to get out of the house a little more. Unless you're in the military, or related to someone who is, the only strain you're feeling from this war is - what? - the price of gasoline maybe? We have a great divide in this country - between the military culture and the civilian culture, and it has never been more pronounced than it is right now. If the war has affected anyone's psyche in this country, it's the thousands of troops we've sent to Iraq and to Afghanistan - and the Marines who will be forced into active duty again, some of them after multiple tours.
NEWS
August 20, 2006
Between Pearl Harbor and the capitulation of Nazi Germany there elapsed three years, five months and a day. That's how long Americans have now been fighting in Iraq, as of this morning. What has been accomplished? Violence is escalating. The death rate of Iraqi civilians is escalating. Bomb attacks directed at U.S. soldiers are escalating. President Bush talks about being at war with "Islamic fascists" - a term that's not altogether wrong, though it packs more emotional than explanatory punch - but he seems to have little idea what to do about it in Iraq except to hang on and keep watch as the situation there continues to deteriorate.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 21, 1995
President Clinton is being bashed by Republicans and some veterans because he is establishing normal diplomatic relations with Vietnam.But I don't understand why they are so upset. It's been 22 years since we dragged ourselves out of that mess of a war. And that's a long, long time to hold a grudge.Some might disagree. But once the fighting is over, nations can bury the hatchets and patch up their differences faster than a lot of divorced couples.Consider World War II, the most terrible conflict in this angry planet's history, which, fortunately, we won. Or so it appeared at the time.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | November 27, 2009
Football fans have been quite taken by a recurring segment on ESPN's "NFL Countdown Show" called "C'mon man." Inspired by former wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson, botched plays from NFL action are highlighted, with the players involved being targeted for the "C'mon man" admonition. It's funny stuff. But when President Barack Obama, after weeks of indecision, prepares to tell the nation in a prime time address that tens of thousands of more troops are going to be sent into the endless war in Afghanistan, it's not so funny.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Greg Garland and David Nitkin and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
Creating a unified front to show they could spend slot machine proceeds wisely, Maryland horse-racing industry leaders unveiled a plan yesterday that they said could revive the struggling sport if lawmakers authorize an expansion of gambling. The 15-page plan is less notable for what it contains than for who signed on to it, bringing together competing factions of the racing scene whose back-biting has contributed to the failure of slot machine legislation for the past two years. Signatories include James L. Gagliano, executive vice president of racing in Maryland for Magna Entertainment Corp.
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