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NEWS
July 25, 2007
The Baltimore County Department of Aging is offering a long-term-care awareness workshop from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. today at the Seven Oaks Senior Center, 9210 Seven Courts Drive. The free presentation is on strategies for planning for financial needs and is to include information on advance directives, financial resources and long-term care insurance. Social Security Administration and the Maryland Department of Aging representatives are to attend. Information: 410-887-2059.
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NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
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NEWS
By Julie Edgar and Julie Edgar,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 22, 2001
John Malejan is among a tiny minority of Americans who own a long-term-care insurance policy, and he considers himself pretty smart for it. He should know. A decade ago, Malejan, of Farmington Hills, Mich., bought policies for himself and his wife, Louise. Four years later, when Alzheimer's plunged her into darkness and forced Malejan to place her in a nursing home, her policy kicked in, covering tens of thousands of dollars' worth of care until her death 2 1/2 years later. Premiums for Louise's policy amounted to $8,800 over the four years, or the cost of about 2 1/2 months of her nursing care.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
Monday, Jan 6 Artful gathering The Provinces Branch Library, 2624 Annapolis Road, Severn, will host an Art Collage Party at 7 p.m. for elementary school students and families. Come for an evening of fun with art. Light snacks will be provided. 410-222-6280 Tuesday, Jan. 7 Comics fans The Anime/Manga Club for teens will meet at 3:30 p.m. at the Crofton Branch Library, 1681 Riedel Road, Crofton. Share in the love of Japanese comics and animation. 410-222-7915. Wednesday, Jan. 8 Camera club The Arundel Camera Club meets at 7:30 p.m. in Room D114 at Severna Park High School, 60 Robinson Road.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
At a time when state budgets across the nation are under enormous strain, it is refreshing to see that Maryland's lawmakers are focusing on solutions and taking important steps to protect the quality of care for our nation's most vulnerable citizens. The March 7 op-ed, "Tax us to help us," illustrates the importance of stable funding to quality nursing home care. To fully understand why the "quality assessment" tax cited in the article would be benefit Maryland's seniors and those most in need, as well as the state budget, you must look to its roots.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
When the Obama administration recently backed off a long-term insurance program that was part of the law to overhaul health care, we all lost. The so-called CLASS Act, which even supporters acknowledge had design flaws, would have allowed workers to voluntarily buy a long-term care policy regardless of their health. The benefit wasn't huge, but it might have been enough to allow some seniors to remain in their homes. And it was better than nothing — which is what most people have now. But as it turned out, the program wasn't financially sustainable and was dropped before it ever launched.
NEWS
November 11, 2007
The Aberdeen Proving Ground Federal Credit Union will offer a free educational seminar from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the credit union's Home Loan Center, 321 S. Main St., Bel Air. "Understanding Long Term Care Insurance" will include the basics of long-term care insurance, who will need it, costs associated with it and what Medicare will cover. Registration is required. Information: 410-893-7359.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1992, Washington Post Writers Group | May 24, 1992
New York -- If you're wondering about nursing-home insurance for yourself or your parents, you're not alone. About 140 insurance companies are gearing up for a brand new market, the first generation of Americans to be fearful not of dying too soon, but of living too long.Here are the answers to some of your questions about long-term care (LTC):* What are the odds of needing nursing-home care? One in four people over 65 will enter a nursing home for at least a year, and one in 10 for five years or more.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 5, 1996
Martin P. Wasserman, state health secretary, has named a committee to begin studying how to reform the most costly aspect of the Medicaid program -- long-term care. Recipients are disabled and chronically ill, and many are in nursing homes.The 15-member advisory group, chaired by Richard Bennett, executive director of long-term care at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, will hold several public hearings. The group is scheduled to issue a report in the fall.The effort is similar to the strategy used to draft a plan for the state's first phase of Medicaid reform, which calls for moving about 200,000 women and children into health maintenance organizations next year.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | December 1, 1997
THE SENIOR circuit is buzzing about the new tax deductions for long-term care. That perks up the ears of middle-agers, too.The write-offs come in two flavors. First, there's a tax deduction for buying long-term care insurance. Second -- and even better -- people already receiving care, at home or in a nursing home, get to deduct uninsured costs.These new tax breaks both took effect this year. But as usual, there are some angles to consider. Here are the rules:If you buy long-term care (LTC)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 2, 2013
It was an accident, really. My saving for retirement. I was in my 30s when I heard about IRAs, individual retirement accounts, and they sounded like a good idea. I was single. No house. No kids. I could afford to put a couple of thousand away each year. I didn't think I'd need it, of course. My dad retired from Alcoa with a pension and full medical coverage for him and my mother, and I figured I would retire that way, too. But I thought it might be good to have a little extra money for, I don't know, world travel.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 9, 2013
You might not want to hang out with me and my pals. The conversation isn't always uplifting: Retirement, fixed incomes, long-term care, assisted living, final directives and funeral plans. And that's at a party. But according to a survey by More magazine, we aren't having those conversations with the people who matter — our kids. So the editors did the work for us and asked, "How much time and money do you owe your aging parents? And how much do you, aging parents, expect from the kids?"
NEWS
September 13, 2013
Financial Wellness seminars begin Sunday, Sept 15 from 5 to 7 p.m., and continue for six weeks at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 7607 Old Sandy Spring Road. Topics covered are: Five Wishes (Christian end of life decisions), Retirement, Wills and Estates, Identity Theft, Getting our Important Papers Organized and Long Term Care. Registration preferred; contact 301-725-1666 or htlc.laurel@verizon.net .
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Jerry Bailey can look back on a Hall of Fame jockey career that featured 5,892 victories but also the searing memory of 17 fractures, including a broken back, jaw and collarbone, and several busted ribs. Yet Bailey considers himself lucky. He never sustained an injury that kept him off the track more than several months. And unlike many jockeys, he could afford disability insurance designed to fill the gap between what riders need after life-altering accidents and what they receive from racetrack policies.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
John Pittas' mother spent six months in a Pennsylvania facility recovering after an auto accident, then moved to Greece to be with her other children. Left behind: $93,000 in unpaid care bills. The facility sued to collect - from John Pittas. A court sided with the care facility last year and ordered the son, who runs a diner in Schnecksville, Pa., to pay up. The basis of the lawsuit is a so-called filial support law, which requires adult children to be responsible for the care of indigent parents.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Broadmead, a continuing-care retirement community in Hunt Valley, has "been so much than just a place to work," said retiring CEO Rich Compton. He has served as the company's leader for almost three decades. During that time, his parents came to live at Broadmead and his children worked their first jobs there. He's seen the aged-care business transformed into a highly regulated business. He's also witnessed how the different expectations each generation has for a retirement facility shape how they are marketed and run. As he prepares to leave Broadmead at the end of June, The Baltimore Sun asked him to share his thoughts on the state of the continuing care industry and its future.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | January 25, 1999
IT SOUNDED like a great idea when President Clinton announced it at the start of this month. A $1,000 tax credit for people needing long-term care, or for the relatives taking care of them at home. It's a down payment on the burgeoning issue of how to support the elderly infirm, while helping families with younger disabled members, too.The House Republicans floated a similar, $500 tax credit in their 1994 Contract With America, although it never made it into law. With both parties behind it, a tax credit should pass (if we ever get away from all-impeachment-all- the-time)
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | May 6, 2001
LONG-TERM insurance is growing ever more complex. As the population ages, larger numbers of people are purchasing coverage. Meanwhile, the industry hopes to reach younger, more affluent buyers by combining long-term care (LTC) with life insurance. A basic LTC policy covers the potentially catastrophic cost of a long-term stay in a nursing home. It pays for people with severe mental impairment, such as Alzheimer's disease, or those who can't handle two of their essential physical needs (typically, bathing, dressing, eating, continence and moving around)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
At Baltimore County's animal shelter this week, dozens of animals were waiting for someone to adopt them. Among them were Cisco, a year-old pit bull terrier, a bulldog named Ivan and Sugar Pie, a tricolor cat. But judging by shelter statistics, potential pets are more likely to be put down than placed in a home. Now, under pressure from animal advocates and some lawmakers, county officials are looking for an animal-oriented nonprofit to take over the shelter. "Much like most animal-control agencies, their focus is really on protecting people from animals," said Ron Lambert, a board member of the Maryland Feline Society.
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