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NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
There was a time (well before I was born) when wearing slacks and a button-up shirt to the office was the domain of professional men. But, as women have taken over the work force, we've taken over that casual office-wear, too. And, as women will do, we've put our own feminine spin on it. Take a look at the way Shikuh Ruinge adds color and embroidery to her button-up and jazzes the pinstripes with pops of yellow and orange. Add to all that her flirty sandals, and the result is workplace "Wow!"
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EXPLORE
Staff Reports | September 17, 2012
Baltimore County is conducting mosquito sprayings this week in Catonsville and next week in Pikesville in the wake of two human cases of West Nile Virus being discovered in the county. Weather permitting, sprayings are scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 19, in parts of Catonsville (click for map); and Mondays, Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, in parts of Pikesville (click for map). Officials said spraying would take place after 7:30 p.m. and residents in those areas should stay indoors during spraying to minimize direct contact with the spray.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 10, 2012
An adult in Central Maryland has been diagnosed with this year's first case of West Nile Virus, according to The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The virus was also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery County by the U.S. Department of Defense. Most people with West Nile virus do not show symptoms. Those who do will have a fever, headache, body aches, skin rash and swollen lymph glands 3 to 15 days after a bite by an infected mosquito.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker | August 16, 2012
A second person in Maryland has been diagnosed with West Nile Virus this year, according to state health officials. The state doesn't identify victims of the disease, but said the diagnosis was in the Washington suburbs, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. This year's first case of West Nile Virus was diagnosed in an adult male in Central Maryland The viruswas also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery Countyby theU.S. Department of Defense.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker | August 16, 2012
A second person in Maryland has been diagnosed with West Nile Virus this year, according to state health officials. The state doesn't identify victims of the disease, but said the diagnosis was in the Washington suburbs, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. This year's first case of West Nile Virus was diagnosed in an adult male in Central Maryland The viruswas also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery Countyby theU.S. Department of Defense.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 2004
WASHINGTON-Democrats have tried reasoning, cajoling, begging, so far to no avail. Yesterday, fellow maverick Howard Dean tried sarcasm, pique and, yes, anger. When it was over, though, consumer advocate Ralph Nader remained a candidate for president, and a potential spoiler in Democrat John Kerry's bid for the White House. "In the long run, it's not important that Howard Dean be president, or that Ralph Nader be president," Dean said during an hourlong radio debate. "I am desperate to send Mr. Bush back to Crawford, Texas."
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | September 17, 2012
Baltimore County is conducting mosquito sprayings this week in Catonsville and next week in Pikesville in the wake of two human cases of West Nile Virus being discovered in the county. Weather permitting, sprayings are scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 19, in parts of Catonsville (click for map); and Mondays, Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, in parts of Pikesville (click for map). Officials said spraying would take place after 7:30 p.m. and residents in those areas should stay indoors during spraying to minimize direct contact with the spray.
NEWS
May 12, 1995
The Patuxent Environment Science Center will present "Where Have All the Wetlands Gone?" from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the North Tract Visitor Contact Station on Bald Eagle Drive in Laurel.Participants can learn how human actions disrupt wetlands' health and what can be done to prevent it. Long pants and rubber boots are recommended.For more information, call (410) 674-3304.POLICE LOG* Annapolis Junction: 10600 block of Guilford Road: A 1984 Mitsubishi Tredia was stolen Tuesday, police said.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1995
He curses. He smokes pot. He dreads calling his weepy mom. He ends up in jail, outer space, a mental hospital, and in the French Quarter with a stripper named Wanda and an ape named Sue.Meet the real Forrest Gump. Not the "Forrest Gump" that has made more than $300 million at the box office and is expected to dominate tonight's Academy Awards ceremony.The movie, which is up for Best Picture and 12 other Oscars, took the main character from an obscure book, sanitized him and transformed him in to a cultural phenomenon.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
Man, 53, accused of illegal logging A man accused of cutting down trees near a protected wetlands in Easton has been charged with illegal logging, a misdemeanor. Charles Peterson is accused of violating the state's nontidal wetlands and sediment control laws last summer. It was not immediately clear whether the 53-year-old owned the land where he cut the trees. The charge was announced yesterday by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who campaigned on a pledge to prosecute more environmental cases.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 10, 2012
An adult in Central Maryland has been diagnosed with this year's first case of West Nile Virus, according to The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The virus was also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery County by the U.S. Department of Defense. Most people with West Nile virus do not show symptoms. Those who do will have a fever, headache, body aches, skin rash and swollen lymph glands 3 to 15 days after a bite by an infected mosquito.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
There was a time (well before I was born) when wearing slacks and a button-up shirt to the office was the domain of professional men. But, as women have taken over the work force, we've taken over that casual office-wear, too. And, as women will do, we've put our own feminine spin on it. Take a look at the way Shikuh Ruinge adds color and embroidery to her button-up and jazzes the pinstripes with pops of yellow and orange. Add to all that her flirty sandals, and the result is workplace "Wow!"
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 2004
WASHINGTON-Democrats have tried reasoning, cajoling, begging, so far to no avail. Yesterday, fellow maverick Howard Dean tried sarcasm, pique and, yes, anger. When it was over, though, consumer advocate Ralph Nader remained a candidate for president, and a potential spoiler in Democrat John Kerry's bid for the White House. "In the long run, it's not important that Howard Dean be president, or that Ralph Nader be president," Dean said during an hourlong radio debate. "I am desperate to send Mr. Bush back to Crawford, Texas."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 3, 1996
State agriculture officials are urging Maryland horse owners to have their animals vaccinated against Eastern Equine Encephalitis after the death of an unvaccinated horse on Virginia's Eastern Shore.Although primarily a disease of horses and birds, the mosquito-borne illness can be transmitted to humans.The EEE virus was detected recently in mosquitoes trapped in Worcester County and earlier this summer in chickens set out as detectors in southern Delaware."Because of the wet summer, mosquitoes have been particularly prevalent this season on the entire Eastern Shore," said Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 21, 2006
The drone of lawn mowers is one of the most familiar sounds of summer. But researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say the buzz also signals a growing health hazard. Nearly 80,000 Americans sought emergency room treatment in 2004 for mower-related injuries, according to statistics drawn from two national databases. The most common (13 percent) are "penetrating trauma" caused by rocks and other debris hurled by mower blades at speeds of up to 160 mph. The most likely to be injured are children younger than 15 and adults age 60 and older.
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