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By Dan Rodricks | March 12, 2011
Last Sunday, my brother and I went to the Catholic church in our hometown to make arrangements for a funeral Mass for my mother, Rose — more familiar to readers of this column as the former Rose Popolo — and, for the first time in all the years since I lived there and served as an altar boy, I didn't recognize a single soul in the pews. What I did recognize were names engraved on a wall — the men and women who had donated things the church needed for its reconstruction after a fire in 1954.
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NEWS
By Douglas M. Schmidt | October 24, 2013
Edward Feete was buried this past week. His was a simple service at a Falls Road funeral home, attended by dozens of his friends and remaining family. Eddie was 68, still youngish by today's standards for a long life. But Eddie was a big guy - a very tall, big-boned, heavy guy. His heart had had enough. Many of you in Towson and on the north side of Baltimore knew Eddie. For most of the twenty-four years before he retired in 2012, Eddie was a bagger at the Giant Food store in Ridgely Plaza.
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NEWS
September 22, 2012
Condolences to the Boniface family on the passing of their beloved "DT" ("'83 Preakness winner Deputed Testamony dies," Sept. 19). He enjoyed a long life at Bonita Farm and certainly brought prestige to the Maryland racing and horse breeding industry. He will always be honored in the record books, but more importantly, he will always be honored as a true champion in the hearts of Maryland racing fans. His greatness will live on through his progeny for many years to come. Kitty Deimel, Hampden
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Sad to hear about Deanna Durbin's death this week at the age of 91. The Winnipeg-born Hollywood actress and singer was a terrific talent whose 1930s and '40s movies earned her enormous popularity (my late father was one of her biggest fans). Deanna Durbin became nearly as famous for her extraordinary retirement from show business in 1949 -- giving up everything to move to France with her third husband. She remained basically secluded for the rest of her long life. At the risk of seeming inappropriate, I thought you wouldn't mind if I devoted this installment of my Midweek Madness featurette to this endearing artist, especially since this clip manages to capture her operatic ability, charm and comedic flair all in one. This is a scene from her last film, "The Love of Mary" (1948)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Sad to hear about Deanna Durbin's death this week at the age of 91. The Winnipeg-born Hollywood actress and singer was a terrific talent whose 1930s and '40s movies earned her enormous popularity (my late father was one of her biggest fans). Deanna Durbin became nearly as famous for her extraordinary retirement from show business in 1949 -- giving up everything to move to France with her third husband. She remained basically secluded for the rest of her long life. At the risk of seeming inappropriate, I thought you wouldn't mind if I devoted this installment of my Midweek Madness featurette to this endearing artist, especially since this clip manages to capture her operatic ability, charm and comedic flair all in one. This is a scene from her last film, "The Love of Mary" (1948)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Some of you have been generous enough to inform me, here or on Facebook or at Twitter, that you do not share my esteem for the writings of Gore Vidal. You perhaps do not care for his politics or his prose style or his morality or his person. Perhaps his patrician hauteur irritates you; I'm sure that he would have wanted it that way. That's as it should be, rather than the bland, stagnant world we would live in if all our tastes agreed. That said, I'm about to quote him, so clear out. Everyone else can stay.
EXPLORE
December 29, 2011
Ever since I did a story on Riley Davis' bone marrow transplant in September 2009, I looked forward to finally meeting him in person. I wanted to be there when he went back to Jacksonville Elementary School. He was in the middle of fourth grade when he was diagnosed with leukemia in 2008. But his health didn't allow him to go back. So then I waited to see when he would start Hereford Middle School. I already envisioned our photographer getting a photo of Riley, known as “Sunny D,” sitting in the cafeteria and surrounded by his friends.
EXPLORE
By Mike McLaughlin | June 29, 2012
I didn't know Miss Katie well. Certainly not as well as those who gathered at St. Mark's United Methodist Church on a beautiful sunny morning June 26 for the homegoing celebration of Catherine Johnstone Hopkins. The lifelong Laurel resident, who was affectionately called Miss Katie for most of her 105 years, passed away June 21 at 105. I had the distinct privilege — honor, really — to be present at the celebration of her 100th birthday back in 2006 and write about her for the Laurel Leader . I was there at the invitation of Ernestine Gibson, to whom I will always be grateful for introducing me to that special lady.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | January 1, 2010
Here we are, embarking on the 21st century's second decade - though some purists argue that isn't actually the case until Jan. 1, 2011, for reasons I really don't care about and won't address here. What I do care about is that this kind of milestone gets the old mind churning away, mulling over the Big Things, such as one's mortality and the evanescence of all life. At my age, it's basically a coin flip as to whether I'll witness the beginning of the next decade. I used to fret about such matters, more than is seemly, but am doing my best these days to come to peace with my impending end. I've had seemingly sane people aver to my face that they "don't think about death."
NEWS
By Douglas M. Schmidt | October 24, 2013
Edward Feete was buried this past week. His was a simple service at a Falls Road funeral home, attended by dozens of his friends and remaining family. Eddie was 68, still youngish by today's standards for a long life. But Eddie was a big guy - a very tall, big-boned, heavy guy. His heart had had enough. Many of you in Towson and on the north side of Baltimore knew Eddie. For most of the twenty-four years before he retired in 2012, Eddie was a bagger at the Giant Food store in Ridgely Plaza.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
Shortly after 12:30 a.m. New Year's Day, not long after fireworks had erupted at the Inner Harbor, James Scales and William Tasker kissed in the ceremonial room of Baltimore City Hall - sealing their new marriage as Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who'd just officiated the ceremony, looked on. Then Scales, a manager in the mayor's office since William Donald Schaefer was in charge, threw up his right hand, Tasker beamed, and the room erupted in...
NEWS
September 22, 2012
Condolences to the Boniface family on the passing of their beloved "DT" ("'83 Preakness winner Deputed Testamony dies," Sept. 19). He enjoyed a long life at Bonita Farm and certainly brought prestige to the Maryland racing and horse breeding industry. He will always be honored in the record books, but more importantly, he will always be honored as a true champion in the hearts of Maryland racing fans. His greatness will live on through his progeny for many years to come. Kitty Deimel, Hampden
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Some of you have been generous enough to inform me, here or on Facebook or at Twitter, that you do not share my esteem for the writings of Gore Vidal. You perhaps do not care for his politics or his prose style or his morality or his person. Perhaps his patrician hauteur irritates you; I'm sure that he would have wanted it that way. That's as it should be, rather than the bland, stagnant world we would live in if all our tastes agreed. That said, I'm about to quote him, so clear out. Everyone else can stay.
EXPLORE
By Mike McLaughlin | June 29, 2012
I didn't know Miss Katie well. Certainly not as well as those who gathered at St. Mark's United Methodist Church on a beautiful sunny morning June 26 for the homegoing celebration of Catherine Johnstone Hopkins. The lifelong Laurel resident, who was affectionately called Miss Katie for most of her 105 years, passed away June 21 at 105. I had the distinct privilege — honor, really — to be present at the celebration of her 100th birthday back in 2006 and write about her for the Laurel Leader . I was there at the invitation of Ernestine Gibson, to whom I will always be grateful for introducing me to that special lady.
EXPLORE
December 29, 2011
Ever since I did a story on Riley Davis' bone marrow transplant in September 2009, I looked forward to finally meeting him in person. I wanted to be there when he went back to Jacksonville Elementary School. He was in the middle of fourth grade when he was diagnosed with leukemia in 2008. But his health didn't allow him to go back. So then I waited to see when he would start Hereford Middle School. I already envisioned our photographer getting a photo of Riley, known as “Sunny D,” sitting in the cafeteria and surrounded by his friends.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 12, 2011
Last Sunday, my brother and I went to the Catholic church in our hometown to make arrangements for a funeral Mass for my mother, Rose — more familiar to readers of this column as the former Rose Popolo — and, for the first time in all the years since I lived there and served as an altar boy, I didn't recognize a single soul in the pews. What I did recognize were names engraved on a wall — the men and women who had donated things the church needed for its reconstruction after a fire in 1954.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
Shortly after 12:30 a.m. New Year's Day, not long after fireworks had erupted at the Inner Harbor, James Scales and William Tasker kissed in the ceremonial room of Baltimore City Hall - sealing their new marriage as Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who'd just officiated the ceremony, looked on. Then Scales, a manager in the mayor's office since William Donald Schaefer was in charge, threw up his right hand, Tasker beamed, and the room erupted in...
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
More of Dr. Ellen Bronson's patients are developing the afflictions typical of old age, including arthritis, failing eyesight, muscle atrophy, kidney problems, flagging appetite, cancer and bad teeth. The problem is that none of her patients can tell her where it hurts. Some are too big for her examining table, and others might prefer to eat her. Bronson, 39, is the head veterinarian at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , and as better husbandry and veterinary care lengthen the life spans of animals in captivity, she and her counterparts around the country are spending more time on geriatric care.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | January 1, 2010
Here we are, embarking on the 21st century's second decade - though some purists argue that isn't actually the case until Jan. 1, 2011, for reasons I really don't care about and won't address here. What I do care about is that this kind of milestone gets the old mind churning away, mulling over the Big Things, such as one's mortality and the evanescence of all life. At my age, it's basically a coin flip as to whether I'll witness the beginning of the next decade. I used to fret about such matters, more than is seemly, but am doing my best these days to come to peace with my impending end. I've had seemingly sane people aver to my face that they "don't think about death."
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