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By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 8, 2011
Dorothy G. Hellman, a retired teacher who founded a book club, died April 1 from complications of a stroke at Roland Park Place. She was 98. The daughter of an accountant and a homemaker, Dorothy Gurkin was born and raised in Newark, N.J., where she graduated in 1930 from South Side High School. She began her college career at Brenau College in Gainesville, Ga., and later transferred to what is now Montclair University in New Jersey, where she earned her bachelor's degree in 1934 in education.
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NEWS
April 9, 2011
Dorothy G. Hellman, a retired teacher who founded a book club, died April 1 from complications of a stroke at Roland Park Place. She was 98. The daughter of an accountant and a homemaker, Dorothy Gurkin was born and raised in Newark, N.J., where she graduated in 1930 from South Side High School. She began her college career at Brenau College in Gainesville, Ga., and later transferred to what is now Montclair University in New Jersey, where she earned her bachelor's degree in 1934 in education.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1998
BAYVILLE, N.Y. -- In another effort to clean up Long Island Sound, federal and state environmental officials have adopted a 15-year, $650 million plan to upgrade sewage treatment plants along the New York and Connecticut shoreline.The plan seeks to reduce nitrogen discharges that have been directly linked to a reduced level of dissolved oxygen in the sound, which harms fish, lobsters and shellfish and the small organisms they feed on.The project was approved unanimously at a recent meeting of the Long Island Sound Policy Committee in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2003
GROTON, Conn. -- Forty years ago in the summer of 1963, a writer for The New Yorker named Morton M. Hunt spent two weeks circumnavigating Long Island Sound in a little sailboat. When he sat down to write, he mourned. A way of life was disappearing. The old culture of the sound -- a still wild mix of scruffy boatyards, Gold Coast snobs and fishermen, all set against the vast mirror of nature -- would surely be homogenized and pushed to the brink, Hunt wrote in the magazine, by the pell-mell rush of suburbanization and the mass market.
NEWS
By Joe Haberstroh and Joe Haberstroh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2001
RONKONKOMA, N.Y. - Another die-off of lobsters apparently occurred across the breadth of Long Island Sound this fall, rocking an industry still staggering from a much more serious biological collapse two years ago. Just as they had in 1999, lobstermen began to pull dead lobsters from their traps in October, said Carl LoBue, a marine biologist with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. "The numbers were not as high as in 1999, but we think that's because there are so many fewer lobsters in the sound now," LoBue said.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2000
NORWALK, Conn. -As recently as early last summer the lobster business on Western Long Island Sound was booming. Lobstermen were turning rich profits and plowing them back into new gear and new boats. But then, the bottom dropped out. The lobsters at the center of the $50 million-a-year business disappeared. They are the victims of a single-cell protozoan - one so little known that it is yet named - that attacks the lobster's nervous system. Within 24 hours of being infected, the lobsters usually die. All 1,300 lobstermen who fish the sound, the third largest lobster fishery on the East Coast, have been affected.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2003
GROTON, Conn. -- Forty years ago in the summer of 1963, a writer for The New Yorker named Morton M. Hunt spent two weeks circumnavigating Long Island Sound in a little sailboat. When he sat down to write, he mourned. A way of life was disappearing. The old culture of the sound -- a still wild mix of scruffy boatyards, Gold Coast snobs and fishermen, all set against the vast mirror of nature -- would surely be homogenized and pushed to the brink, Hunt wrote in the magazine, by the pell-mell rush of suburbanization and the mass market.
FEATURES
By Susan Campbell and Susan Campbell,HARTFORD COURANT | July 17, 2003
STRATFORD, Conn. - The cool evening mist doesn't penetrate the ground beneath this beech tree in Stratford. Near here, monk parakeets native to South America, the descendants of long-ago escapees, have built their intricate nests. This is a favorite walk of Stratford poet Norah Pollard. She enjoys the juxtaposition of craggy fishermen and women on a nearby dock and the delicate green birds meant for cages. The beech's trunk is covered with whirls and folds that look, says the poet, like body sex-parts.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 9, 1991
Slovenia and Yugoslavia agree on a cooling-off period which does not, unfortunately, cover Croatia.Don't look now but the state of Connecticut just slid into Long Island Sound.Never mind the standings. The Orioles found one, maybe two, left-handed home run hitters for the short right field and prevailing winds of Camden Yards. That's what this season is for.A Stich in time saves nein.
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
Think of a young boy dressed in velvet and lace, his hair falling to his shoulders in long, golden curls, the personification of the pampered, effeminate mama's boy: Little Lord Fauntleroy. For one small boy, Fauntleroy was all too real. Vivian Burnett was the real-life model for the popular book written by his mother. In the public eye he was Fauntleroy, and Fauntleroy's fame haunted him to the end of his life. His mother was Frances Hodgson Burnett, the author of such children's classics as "A Little Princess" and "The Secret Garden."
NEWS
By Joe Haberstroh and Joe Haberstroh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2001
RONKONKOMA, N.Y. - Another die-off of lobsters apparently occurred across the breadth of Long Island Sound this fall, rocking an industry still staggering from a much more serious biological collapse two years ago. Just as they had in 1999, lobstermen began to pull dead lobsters from their traps in October, said Carl LoBue, a marine biologist with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. "The numbers were not as high as in 1999, but we think that's because there are so many fewer lobsters in the sound now," LoBue said.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2000
NORWALK, Conn. -As recently as early last summer the lobster business on Western Long Island Sound was booming. Lobstermen were turning rich profits and plowing them back into new gear and new boats. But then, the bottom dropped out. The lobsters at the center of the $50 million-a-year business disappeared. They are the victims of a single-cell protozoan - one so little known that it is yet named - that attacks the lobster's nervous system. Within 24 hours of being infected, the lobsters usually die. All 1,300 lobstermen who fish the sound, the third largest lobster fishery on the East Coast, have been affected.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1998
BAYVILLE, N.Y. -- In another effort to clean up Long Island Sound, federal and state environmental officials have adopted a 15-year, $650 million plan to upgrade sewage treatment plants along the New York and Connecticut shoreline.The plan seeks to reduce nitrogen discharges that have been directly linked to a reduced level of dissolved oxygen in the sound, which harms fish, lobsters and shellfish and the small organisms they feed on.The project was approved unanimously at a recent meeting of the Long Island Sound Policy Committee in Manhattan.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | March 15, 2009
"Many Brave Hearts Are Asleep in the Deep" 1897 sea chantey The ferocious February nor'easter that severely disrupted Atlantic shipping more than a half-century ago nearly took the life of a Baltimore merchant mariner who was aboard a crippled oil tanker. The gale that snapped the SS Pendleton in two off Cape Cod in the early morning hours of Feb. 18, 1952, inflicted a similar fate on another T-2 class tanker, the SS Fort Mercer, that was steaming some 30 miles southeast of Chatham, Mass.
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