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By Carrie Donovan and Carrie Donovan,New York Times News Service : | April 18, 1991
Now that long hair is back in style, let's discuss where it's going.At first, the trend seemed to be to pile it up in a loose beehive, as Ivana Trump did last year. But judging from the models at the fall fashion shows in New York last week, the movement is now reversed. For sure, long hair is the way to go, but the direction is down.One model after another breezed down the runway with luxurious locks tumbling and bouncing well below their shoulders. Sometimes the hair was straight and smooth.
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NEWS
By Ben Krull | October 26, 2011
The race for the Republican presidential nomination turned nasty this week, as Mitt Romney's former hairstylist, Francois Lockes, accused the GOP front-runner of using hair color to grey his temples. "Monsieur Romney est inauthentique," Mr. Lockes, a French citizen, told reporters. "Le candidat would shave his head pour un vote!" The Romney campaign denied the accusation. "Frank the barber is a disgruntled former employee who was fired for trying to spike Mitt's chamomile tea with caffeine," said a Romney spokesperson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 23, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- Actress Keri Russell says it was a "brave and liberating thing to do." Her boss, Susanne Daniels, the head of programming at the WB, thinks it was a knucklehead thing to do and says she doesn't want to see it happen ever again. We're talking about about Felicity's hair. With hundreds of channels and millions of possible shows to write about, the key to covering television is to know what matters. Felicity's hair matters. Over the summer, Russell, star of the WB's "Felicity," cut her long, curly hair, and six months later it is still one of the hottest topics of discussion on the Winter Press Tour.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
Leo A. Hoshal, a retired locksmith who once made news by banning long-haired male patrons from the Bel Air movie theater he managed, died of cancer and pulmonary disease complications Wednesday at his caregiver's home in Delta, Pa. He was 86. Born in Marble, Minn., he served in the Army during World War II, as did his father and three brothers. Throughout his life he kept a service flag with five stars on it, one for each family member in the service. He remained in the military through the 1950s and attained the rank of sergeant.
FEATURES
By ELSA KLENSCH and ELSA KLENSCH,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 19, 1998
Growing up, my friends teased that I dressed like a "plain Jane." They were right. My mother insisted that a "lady" doesn't dress to call attention to herself.But now that I have grown up and moved out I want to dress more glamorously.I am going to my friend's formal wedding, and I would like to wear a dress with glitter but also in good taste.Donatella Girombelli of the Italian house of Genny gave me this advice:"Look for the simplest style in a luxurious fabric to give a sense of glamour and sophistication."
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Few who saw it will ever forget it. The sight of a coach cutting off his wrestler's hair during a timeout is something so rare it may never have happened before.But it happened last season to Oakland Mills' John Nguyen. The loss of his cherished long hair proved the price he had to pay to win his regional semifinal grudge match against Wilde Lake's Alex Hernandez. And Nguyen paid it -- albeit reluctantly.Nguyen, a tri-captain with a 20-3 record, is one of the most reliable wrestlers this season for the Scorpions, who have an 8-4 overall record and 6-1 league mark.
FEATURES
By Lois Duncan | January 5, 2000
Editor's note: On her sixth birthday, Emily wishes for the longest hair in the world. As it continues to grow and grow, it creates terrible problems. It was Emily's birthday. She stood gazing down at the sparkling candles on her cake. "I wish I had very long hair," said Emily. "I wish I had the longest hair in the world." Then she blew out the candles -- every last one. "What a silly wish!" said her mother. "Short hair is so easy! Why would you want very long hair?" "Our class is having a play," Emily told her. "The girl with the longest hair will be the Princess."
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 17, 1994
Q: I married a New Yorker and am moving to Manhattan in December. As I've lived all my life in Venezuela, I have no heavy clothes for the cold. What should be my first buy?A: The best advice I can offer is from Milan designer Gianfranco Ferre. His fall collection was full of sensible but fashion-packed coats."After last winter, I feel women should have warm coats. I cut my storm coat long and full, yet romantic."Under a coat like this you can layer. Wear a body suit, sweater and pantsuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | February 1, 2001
Haircuts for a cause Do you or does someone you know have long hair? As in Crystal Gayle, Jose Eber and Cher- length hair. How about parting with a bit of it for a great cause? Locks of Love, a nonprofit organization that makes wigs for children who have lost their hair, is looking for donations of at least 10 inches of hair. Stop by the Hair Network in Fallston Sunday for a free haircut, and let the shop keep the cutting. Hair must be 10 or more inches in a braid or ponytail. Children under 18 need parental permission to participate.
NEWS
By kate shatzkin and kate shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Tangles are the down side of having a child with long hair - and getting them out is painful and time-consuming, for parents and kids. That said, after casting about for advice for my own family, I've finally found some that works to share with you. The tips come from Liz Muller, a hair stylist in Hollywood, Fla., who shared her methods on expertvillage.com. (I added a couple of my own tips in parentheses and at the end.) * Use a wide-toothed comb, ideally one that rolls. If you don't have a comb, try a paddle brush, which is good for smoothing the hair.
NEWS
By kate shatzkin and kate shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Tangles are the down side of having a child with long hair - and getting them out is painful and time-consuming, for parents and kids. That said, after casting about for advice for my own family, I've finally found some that works to share with you. The tips come from Liz Muller, a hair stylist in Hollywood, Fla., who shared her methods on expertvillage.com. (I added a couple of my own tips in parentheses and at the end.) * Use a wide-toothed comb, ideally one that rolls. If you don't have a comb, try a paddle brush, which is good for smoothing the hair.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2007
On the covers of magazines, in music videos and on movie screens, more and more beautiful black faces are staring out at us. Beyonce. Sanaa Lathan. Ciara. Jennifer Hudson. Naomi Campbell. Tyra Banks. They are of all shapes and complexions, showing off the magnificent breadth of beauty among African-American women. But look closer. There's a sameness there -- one unifying trait for many black women in the public arena. Long, flowing -- often artificial -- tresses. At a time when more and more women of color are choosing to wear their hair in its natural state -- and still others are opting for sassy short cuts or other fashionable styles -- it's hard not to notice a disproportionate number of black celebrities, models and television personalities sporting hair weaves.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 26, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.-- --Scruffy first baseman Kevin Millar may be quixotic, but he is no quitter. Last year, he arrived at spring training bent on bringing a little bit of Boston into the Orioles' clubhouse, but he did not succeed in persuading management to relax the conservative facial-hair policy that prohibits anything more than a tidy mustache. This year, he arrived in camp with his usual three-day beard and began jousting the same windmill. "It's time to end that," Millar said.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | October 2, 2005
I remember when my hair was just beyond my shoulders. And so does my mother. She reminds of this every now and then. As a child, I had braids and ponytails. To style my thick, long hair, my mother used the hot comb to straighten my tight curls. I can still remember the sound of the comb as it crackled and sizzled near my ear. At times, I felt it, too. The use of the hot comb didn't last long. Tired of wrestling with my hair, my mother turned to giving me perms. That was another painful experience.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2004
ST. LOUIS - Imagine you're the 30-year-old general manager of the Boston Red Sox, and on the first day of spring training, your center fielder saunters through the door looking like a cross between Charles Manson and Yanni. Johnny Damon's deep brown locks are drooping near his shoulders, and he's looking at you from behind a full-length beard, knowing this is your test. Would you smile and compliment Damon for expressing his individuality? Or would you quickly grab for the scissors? Theo Epstein walked a fine line with that decision this spring, and it became a defining moment for the Red Sox, who hold a 2-0 World Series lead over the St. Louis Cardinals heading into Game 3 tonight at Busch Stadium.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2002
HAIRCUTS CAN be fun, even adventurous, or downright necessary. You might not consider getting a bob to be helpful, however, unless your long locks are hindering your climb up the corporate ladder or causing you to trip. But Lauren Kauffman had a haircut recently that will indeed be helpful to children that she does not even know. She donated her ponytail to Locks of Love, a nonprofit organization that provides hairpieces for children who have lost their hair because of cancer and other illnesses.
FEATURES
By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,Orlando Sentinel | December 13, 1990
In the rush to look trendy this summer, a lot of women lost their heads -- or should we say hair?Spurred on by the example of shorn supermodels such as Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington, they told their hairdressers: Cut it all off.The new style was great -- in the office, at the beach, on the road.But now that the party season is here, they're longing for the glamour and femininity of long hair."No problem," says hair stylist Bill Haire, who works at Candace Reed Hair Design in Longwood, Fla. "Get a wig, a headband and some real big earrings.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | October 2, 2005
I remember when my hair was just beyond my shoulders. And so does my mother. She reminds of this every now and then. As a child, I had braids and ponytails. To style my thick, long hair, my mother used the hot comb to straighten my tight curls. I can still remember the sound of the comb as it crackled and sizzled near my ear. At times, I felt it, too. The use of the hot comb didn't last long. Tired of wrestling with my hair, my mother turned to giving me perms. That was another painful experience.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
Their hair was big, their music was loud and their lyrics were oozing with double-entendres. They've come to be known as "hair bands," and in the late '80s and early '90s, their pop-metal sound, consisting mainly of infectious party anthems and melodic "power ballads," flooded the airwaves of radio and MTV and sold millions of albums. Hair bands, so dubbed because of their ridiculously puffy, hair sprayed coiffures, celebrated the excesses of rock stardom. Their outlandish personas were defined by a life of fame, money, groupies and hangovers.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | February 18, 2001
Once upon a time, short-haired, clean-cut men ruled the pages of fashion magazines, celebrity photo spreads and glossy ads. But then one day Los Angeles Laker Kobe Bryant grew out his hair into a glorious, hip Afro. Tom Cruise dazzled audiences in the 1999 film "Magnolia" with his long, unkempt hair. Women swooned over New York Knick Latrell Sprewell, who looked sexily bad with his tres cool cornrows. And just a few months ago, the Backstreet Boys unveiled their new look, with two members projecting rugged manliness through their sleek, long Fabio-esque tresses.
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