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Long Goodbye

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By Anita Hendrix | November 17, 1994
IN THE WINTER of 1980, I began the long goodbye for my father. After living on my own for some time, I had returned to my parents' home to recuperate from an automobile accident. Almost immediately I noticed that my father was acting very odd. He padded surreptitiously around the house, as if trying to be invisible. Also, he was constantly eating apples. He would come to my bedroom door munching the ever-present apple, pause apologetically, then ask how I was doing. My first day back he must have eaten 10 apples and paused 20 times at my door.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 5, 2008
Goodbye." It's a simple word, but sometimes it's just hard to say. OK, well maybe it's easy to say and hard to, you know, stick with it. That has been Brett Favre's problem. He has come so close to saying goodbye so many, many times. Then, in March, he did say it. There were tears and everything. But we all know what has happened since. Today, he'll be there when the Packers resume training camp. But before we accuse ol' Brett of an acute case of vacillation, let's point out that he's hardly alone.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 1, 2005
October is our golden month, delivering a stretch of pleasant weather that makes it easy to remain idle, to behave like the grasshopper not the ant. A quirk of the calendar gives us five weekends this October. Tempted as I am to use them lolling in the autumnal sunshine, I know I have to get cracking and start saying my long goodbye to the vegetable garden. There are a couple of ways to say farewell to your garden. One is to let the frost do the bulk of the work. A frost sweeps in like a banshee, leveling everything and leaving you with the task of removing the deceased.
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | May 12, 2007
Summer is just around the corner, meaning it's prime time to shed those winter pounds. But I'm not talking double chins and love handles. It's time to lose the ex and say goodbye to the fake-up. We all know the fake-up. You've broken up and gotten back together so many times that your friends have lost count. You've finally broken up -- I know, you really mean it this time -- but you're still on the phone 24/7, and you still, er, "know" each other. Biblically. In a dating world of multiple night stands and "friends with benefits," there's always room -- firmly wedged between the break-up and the make-up -- for the fake-up.
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | May 12, 2007
Summer is just around the corner, meaning it's prime time to shed those winter pounds. But I'm not talking double chins and love handles. It's time to lose the ex and say goodbye to the fake-up. We all know the fake-up. You've broken up and gotten back together so many times that your friends have lost count. You've finally broken up -- I know, you really mean it this time -- but you're still on the phone 24/7, and you still, er, "know" each other. Biblically. In a dating world of multiple night stands and "friends with benefits," there's always room -- firmly wedged between the break-up and the make-up -- for the fake-up.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2007
Shareholders of Mercantile Bankshares Corp. are expected to vote overwhelmingly tomorrow in favor of selling the bank to the Pittsburgh-based PNC Financial Services Group, all but erasing another blue-chip nameplate from Baltimore's skyline and introducing a new player to an already competitive local banking market. The vote is one of the last remaining obstacles to completing the $6 billion cash and stock deal next month, creating the nation's 11th largest bank in terms of deposits. When it's over, PNC officials promise a bank with free ATM transactions, more product offerings and easier Web access than existed under Mercantile's banner.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | May 20, 2001
UP -- The long goodbye Cal Ripken is 40 and the Orioles have no logical heir. It's a delicate thing for the club to protect itself without denting a legacy. Did anyone expect it to be easy? UP -- Lineup intrigue Who needs the latest Michael Crichton tome when Mike Hargrove puts out an unpredictable card every day? DOWN -- Ryan Kohlmeier After hinting at it for weeks, Hargrove confirmed the obvious Wednesday. Kohly the Closer is now one among many. UP -- The trading block The Orioles are likely to trade several veterans before July 31 (Delino DeShields, Chuck McElroy, Jeff Conine)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 22, 2002
The Third Man, featuring the writing-directing team of Graham Greene and Carol Reed at its peak, caps the first two months of the Charles Theatre's Saturday revival series with a double-barreled bang. It's as contemporary in thought and feeling as a classic movie can be. Consider these ingredients: A divided city with a multinational peacekeeping force; a slippery villain who has no pangs of conscience about peddling diluted penicillin; an American who believes in a cowboy code of honor; a Brit who has few illusions about anybody's innocence and articulates how justice should be done.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy -- Anne Tyler, author For all of my grownup life, I have re-read Anna Karenina every single summer. Or I used to. Then it seemed I started just saying I read it. Saying it now in print means that I will have to go back into my shelves and dig it out again. I'm looking forward to it. Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill by Maud Hart Lovelace -- Laura Lippman, author The summer I was 11, I took this classic to Bethany Beach, along with six books by Walter Farley, having forgotten that I wasn't particularly interested in horses.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 1996
"Envy," said John Gay, "is a kind of praise." With that noble sentiment in mind, I offer the following list of books, all of which have one thing in common: They make me jealous. Each is exactly the sort of book I wish I were smart enough, or imaginative enough, or talented enough, to write. Every time I reread one of these books, I get a little greener. The next time you turn to this page and find a pan with my name at the top, remember this list, and smile. I may sound cocky, but here are seven authors who leave me at the starting gate:"An Alphabet for Gourmets," by M.F.K.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2007
Shareholders of Mercantile Bankshares Corp. are expected to vote overwhelmingly tomorrow in favor of selling the bank to the Pittsburgh-based PNC Financial Services Group, all but erasing another blue-chip nameplate from Baltimore's skyline and introducing a new player to an already competitive local banking market. The vote is one of the last remaining obstacles to completing the $6 billion cash and stock deal next month, creating the nation's 11th largest bank in terms of deposits. When it's over, PNC officials promise a bank with free ATM transactions, more product offerings and easier Web access than existed under Mercantile's banner.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Robert Altman, whose inventiveness and independence revolutionized American moviemaking, has died at 81 of complications from cancer. In March, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded the maverick director an honorary Oscar for his iconoclastic career. He never stopped directing at peak form. In the spring, he released his last movie, A Prairie Home Companion, a lyric valentine to performers of lost radio arts. Although Mr. Altman's films could express cynicism and rage, he was "a major humanist and just a great, great American guy in his candor and his warmth," said director and friend Jonathan Demme.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 28, 2006
"They say, Katie, you're like a flame / into our lives you came." -- lyric from Stone Phillips' "Goodbye to Katie" TODAY / / 7 a.m. weekdays / / Katie Couric's final day on the show is Wednesday / / WBAL (Channel 11) Couric at a glance Born: Jan. 7, 1957 Hometown: Arlington, Va. Education: Bachelor's degree, University of Virginia Awards: Peabody Joined "Today" as co-anchor: April 4, 1991 Most memorable story: Couric had a colonoscopy on TV on March 6, 2000, to heighten awareness of the procedure Family: Two daughters.
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | April 15, 2006
On the otherwise unremarkable occasion last month when Paul S. Sarbanes cast his 11,000th Senate vote, his colleagues interrupted their debate to burst into the sort of florid testimonials that typically come when a lawmaker is concluding the final weeks in office. Senators were just hitting their effusive stride - Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia may have claimed top honors by comparing Mr. Sarbanes to the classical Greek thinker Demosthenes - when the Marylander delicately called a halt to it. "I'm still here until the 3rd of January 2007," he reminded them.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 1, 2005
October is our golden month, delivering a stretch of pleasant weather that makes it easy to remain idle, to behave like the grasshopper not the ant. A quirk of the calendar gives us five weekends this October. Tempted as I am to use them lolling in the autumnal sunshine, I know I have to get cracking and start saying my long goodbye to the vegetable garden. There are a couple of ways to say farewell to your garden. One is to let the frost do the bulk of the work. A frost sweeps in like a banshee, leveling everything and leaving you with the task of removing the deceased.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 28, 2005
We started calling it "Jessie's Farewell Tour," and I think it lasted longer than Cher's. During all of August, as everybody packed up to return to college, Jessie and her friends gathered daily to say goodbye. To each other, to someone else, to the same person. She interrupted the family vacation to return home for a farewell dinner and then left vacation early so she could say goodbye -- to the same friend. Romeo and Juliet didn't say goodbye on the balcony as many times as these kids have said goodbye.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Robert Altman, whose inventiveness and independence revolutionized American moviemaking, has died at 81 of complications from cancer. In March, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded the maverick director an honorary Oscar for his iconoclastic career. He never stopped directing at peak form. In the spring, he released his last movie, A Prairie Home Companion, a lyric valentine to performers of lost radio arts. Although Mr. Altman's films could express cynicism and rage, he was "a major humanist and just a great, great American guy in his candor and his warmth," said director and friend Jonathan Demme.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | May 22, 1992
One of the longest goodbyes in TV history finally ends tonight with Johnny Carson's signing off forever as host of "The Tonight Show."Under the heading of "All politics are local," though, Baltimore area viewers might be seeing the taped broadcast of Carson's last show a bit later than the rest of the country.The show is scheduled to air at 11:35 p.m. tonight on Channel 2, but WMAR management said it won't start the Carson tape until the Baltimore Orioles' game against the California Angels ends and 35 minutes of local news with Stan Stovall and Sally Thorner have aired.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy -- Anne Tyler, author For all of my grownup life, I have re-read Anna Karenina every single summer. Or I used to. Then it seemed I started just saying I read it. Saying it now in print means that I will have to go back into my shelves and dig it out again. I'm looking forward to it. Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill by Maud Hart Lovelace -- Laura Lippman, author The summer I was 11, I took this classic to Bethany Beach, along with six books by Walter Farley, having forgotten that I wasn't particularly interested in horses.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 10, 2004
BOSTON -- The words in the announcement made it sound as if it were a fair fight. Television anchors and reporters said the same thing: Ronald Reagan died after a long "battle" with Alzheimer's disease. But Mr. Reagan and Alzheimer's were never equal adversaries. If this was a battle, there was no defense against an illness that attacks the brain's hard drive as if it were a computer virus, erasing the ability to remember and think, byte by byte. Nor was there any arsenal to protect even a former president of the United States from the devastation that leaves family and friends bereaved for the living.
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