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BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
The state opened hearings yesterday that could, perhaps as early as spring, lead to the biggest change in phone service in Maryland since the breakup of the Bell System. Verizon Communications Inc. is seeking permission from the Maryland Public Service Commission to offer long-distance service in the state. The company, which was created in the federal government's breakup of the Bell phone monopoly 18 years ago, is the nation's leading provider of local and wireless phone service. The company must prove that it has opened the local phone market to competitors to win state and federal approval to re-enter the long-distance market.
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NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Verizon Communications Inc. won Federal Communications Commission approval yesterday to offer long-distance telephone service to customers in Maryland, West Virginia and the District of Columbia, paving the way for the nation's largest local phone company to have a piece of the long-distance market in every state except Alaska. Verizon, a Bell spinoff that has 10.4 million long-distance customers in the 47 other states, is expected to aggressively compete with companies such as AT&T Corp.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1998
AT&T announced yesterday that it is asking the Maryland Public Service Commission to open up short-distance toll calls to freer competition.The action continues a battle between AT&T and Bell Atlantic Corp. as each seeks to claim a piece of the other's market.In a petition filed last week with the PSC, AT&T Communications of Maryland Inc. said Maryland consumers "are being denied lower prices and new service selections" by the lack of short distance toll competition.At issue is how calls are handled within four regions of the state, called local access and transport areas, or LATAs.
NEWS
December 15, 2002
THE 1984 BELL system bust-up brought competition to the long-distance market, benefiting consumers across the country. The 1996 Telecommunications Act was supposed to do the same for local phone service. That's started to happen in some states - such as New York, Michigan and California - but not yet in Maryland. And that must end. In Maryland, Verizon - heir to the Bell monopoly - retains roughly 95 percent of the local lines. AT&T and other competitors say that's largely because Verizon's wholesale prices for using its system to provide local service are much too high, in some cases more than Verizon's retail prices.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1999
Bell Atlantic today will become the first of the regional Bell companies allowed into the $80 billion long-distance market, signaling an era of competition in the communications industry, people close to the decision said yesterday.The announcement, expected from the Federal Communications Commission, would allow Bell Atlantic to sell long-distance services to 6.6 million households it serves in New York state.Approval would mark the first time since the breakup of AT&T Corp.'s Bell System 15 years ago that millions of consumers would be able to get both local and long-distance phone services from an offspring of Ma Bell.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1998
The nation's chief telephone regulator yesterday blasted a recent court decision that could open the long-distance market to regional local-service phone companies.Federal Communications Commission Chairman William Kennard called the decision "unequivocally bad for the consumers of America."On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Joe Kendall, in Wichita Falls, Tex., ruled that the Telecommunications Act of 1996 unconstitutionally prevents the regional local-service companies, known as Baby Bells, from entering the $80 billion long-distance market.
NEWS
December 15, 2002
THE 1984 BELL system bust-up brought competition to the long-distance market, benefiting consumers across the country. The 1996 Telecommunications Act was supposed to do the same for local phone service. That's started to happen in some states - such as New York, Michigan and California - but not yet in Maryland. And that must end. In Maryland, Verizon - heir to the Bell monopoly - retains roughly 95 percent of the local lines. AT&T and other competitors say that's largely because Verizon's wholesale prices for using its system to provide local service are much too high, in some cases more than Verizon's retail prices.
NEWS
October 11, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times which was published Wednesday.THE WORLD of telecommunications has been shaken once again, this time by the recent announcement of a $115 billion merger between MCIWorldCom and Sprint Corp., the second-and third-largest long-distance telephone companies.This is the biggest yet in a string of mammoth mergers. The two companies and industry analysts believe that the merger makes good business sense and will benefit stockholders.Federal regulators must make sure this is a good deal for consumers as well.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
MCI WorldCom Inc. will take on Bell Atlantic Corp. beginning today for a share of a coveted market -- long-distance calls placed within Maryland and Virginia.Sprint Corp. also has plans to enter the in-state long-distance market in Maryland this month. Expect other competitors as well, say analysts.The surge in competition for in-state long-distance phone customers -- also known as "local toll" customers -- is due to the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which required local phone companies to grant equal access in their markets by today.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this report | August 16, 1997
The local telephone giant created by the $25.6 billion merger of Nynex and Bell Atlantic began its first day of operation yesterday with a promise to move quickly into long-distance service.The new Bell Atlantic Corp., which became the second-biggest telephone company behind AT&T Corp., said it expects to offer long-distance service sometime next year."We have the richest long-distance market in the world," Raymond W. Smith, Bell Atlantic chairman and chief executive, said in a teleconference from New York.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
During a recess from the long-distance phone hearings in Maryland last week, representatives for the competing phone companies wondered aloud whether they could switch sides when they returned after lunch and whether anyone would notice because they knew each other's arguments so well. "We were just saying we should swap roles," said Mark A. Keffer, a regional vice president for AT&T Corp. "We just take this from state to state to state." Welcome to the "271" hearings - the telephone industry's equivalent of a traveling stage company, only it brings its own audience, too. Today, Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
The state opened hearings yesterday that could, perhaps as early as spring, lead to the biggest change in phone service in Maryland since the breakup of the Bell System. Verizon Communications Inc. is seeking permission from the Maryland Public Service Commission to offer long-distance service in the state. The company, which was created in the federal government's breakup of the Bell phone monopoly 18 years ago, is the nation's leading provider of local and wireless phone service. The company must prove that it has opened the local phone market to competitors to win state and federal approval to re-enter the long-distance market.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1999
Bell Atlantic today will become the first of the regional Bell companies allowed into the $80 billion long-distance market, signaling an era of competition in the communications industry, people close to the decision said yesterday.The announcement, expected from the Federal Communications Commission, would allow Bell Atlantic to sell long-distance services to 6.6 million households it serves in New York state.Approval would mark the first time since the breakup of AT&T Corp.'s Bell System 15 years ago that millions of consumers would be able to get both local and long-distance phone services from an offspring of Ma Bell.
NEWS
October 11, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times which was published Wednesday.THE WORLD of telecommunications has been shaken once again, this time by the recent announcement of a $115 billion merger between MCIWorldCom and Sprint Corp., the second-and third-largest long-distance telephone companies.This is the biggest yet in a string of mammoth mergers. The two companies and industry analysts believe that the merger makes good business sense and will benefit stockholders.Federal regulators must make sure this is a good deal for consumers as well.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
In a move that could lead to major changes in the telephone industry nationwide, Bell Atlantic Corp. filed yesterday for permission to sell long-distance telephone service in New York state.If the Federal Communications Commission grants the company's request, the stage would be set for Bell Atlantic and the other regional local-service phone companies to become major players in the $80 billion national long-distance market.This would cause a furious new round of competition in the industry and put new pressure on current long-distance kings such as AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
MCI WorldCom Inc. will take on Bell Atlantic Corp. beginning today for a share of a coveted market -- long-distance calls placed within Maryland and Virginia.Sprint Corp. also has plans to enter the in-state long-distance market in Maryland this month. Expect other competitors as well, say analysts.The surge in competition for in-state long-distance phone customers -- also known as "local toll" customers -- is due to the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which required local phone companies to grant equal access in their markets by today.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
Bell Atlantic Corp. began its push for permission to enter the long-distance market in Maryland yesterday, asking state regulators, in effect, to give them a good reference when the Federal Communications Commission begins asking questions this summer.In a filing to Maryland's Public Service Commission, Bell Atlantic tried to make the case that it has opened the market for local phone service in Maryland to competition. Under the telecommunications deregulation law Congress passed last year, Bell Atlantic has to show it has given up its monopoly on local service before it can be allowed into long-distance.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
AT&T won by losing.The company that has emerged in the decade since it was separated from its local operating companies is far different from the plodding colossus known as Ma Bell. The culture that ruled the old Bell System has largely been purged. A master monopolist has transformed itself into a feared competitor.AT&T's triumph wasn't immediately apparent. After the long war with federal antitrust authorities ended in surrender, there came a painful reconstruction.Many Bell veterans had a hard time adjusting to a new, more competitive world.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1998
AT&T announced yesterday that it is asking the Maryland Public Service Commission to open up short-distance toll calls to freer competition.The action continues a battle between AT&T and Bell Atlantic Corp. as each seeks to claim a piece of the other's market.In a petition filed last week with the PSC, AT&T Communications of Maryland Inc. said Maryland consumers "are being denied lower prices and new service selections" by the lack of short distance toll competition.At issue is how calls are handled within four regions of the state, called local access and transport areas, or LATAs.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1998
The nation's chief telephone regulator yesterday blasted a recent court decision that could open the long-distance market to regional local-service phone companies.Federal Communications Commission Chairman William Kennard called the decision "unequivocally bad for the consumers of America."On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Joe Kendall, in Wichita Falls, Tex., ruled that the Telecommunications Act of 1996 unconstitutionally prevents the regional local-service companies, known as Baby Bells, from entering the $80 billion long-distance market.
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