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By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
Rates for long-distance calls within Maryland will fall by 17 percent or more beginning today, after state regulators gave final blessing yesterday to Bell Atlantic Corp.'s plan to cut the fees it charges long-distance carriers to help them complete calls.The plan approved by the state Public Service Commission was a blueprint for implementing the PSC's earlier order that Bell Atlantic cut so-called access charges by $32.1 million. Those charges represent as much as 45 percent of the cost of completing a long-distance call, said Joan Marshall, president of AT&T Corp.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 2003
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Sprint Corp. introduced bundled local, long-distance and wireless calling plans in Maryland and 35 other states yesterday to gain a bigger share of the local-phone business. Sprint, which is seeking to boost revenue while sales fall at its long-distance telephone business, will target a local-phone campaign to its millions of wireless and land-line customers. The company's promotion campaign includes advertisements in bill inserts and telemarketing calls. They will be promoting bundled call plans with unlimited minutes.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
Customers of Sprint are the most satisfied of the three major long-distance carriers, according to a new survey by J. D. Power and Associates, a marketing firm best known for its customer satisfaction reports on the auto industry.In a small but telling sign of how information and communication industries are playing a bigger role in the U.S. economy, Power plans to add surveys of local phone carriers, cellular phone companies, and cable and satellite TV providers. The long-distance survey is the firm's second such annual report.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
When Augustus G. Davis and John Henry C. Watts made the first phone call in Baltimore in 1877, from their electrical shop downtown to the home of John Blattau in Highlandtown, they owned the only line and had just one choice for a connection. Not much different from today, some would say. The amount of phone competition in Maryland will be debated in coming months. And phone choices could change greatly in a year or so based on the outcome of that debate. Verizon Communications Inc., the largest local phone company in the state and the nation, has asked officials for permission to begin selling long-distance service in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Gene Tharpe and Gene Tharpe,Cox News Service | May 21, 1992
ATLANTA -- Lisa Hoffman did not ask for her long-distance telephone service to be switched from Sprint to MCI Communications.So why was there a $1.49 charge on her bill for switching to MCI?"
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
AT&T Corp. will cut rates on long-distance calls within Maryland by 10 percent or more, passing along the state-ordered cut in the charges AT&T pays Bell Atlantic Corp. to connect calls from customers' homes or offices to the long-distance company's network.AT&T's filing with the Public Service Commission, expected tomorrow, could mean a cut of $15 million to $20 million in the rates AT&T charges for long-distance services within Maryland. That business was $143 million in the 12 months that ended in June.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission will order the nation's local telephone companies today to reduce the access charges they impose on long-distance carriers by about $1 billion a year for the next few years, FCC officials said yesterday.The rate cuts could translate into one of the biggest single reductions in long-distance telephone prices since the breakup of the Bell System 10 years ago. Consumers are likely to feel some of the impact in lower long-distance prices, although long-distance carriers like AT&T, MCI and Sprint will try to keep as much of the reduction for themselves as the market will allow.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A key Senate committee will try today to finish writing a bill to reshape U.S. telecommunications policy while a divided industry continues to argue over what the measure should contain.The infighting threatens to push final approval of the legislation into 1995 or later."We're going to have some fireworks tomorrow. We're going to be bringing up a lot of issues," Ward White, vice president of federal relations at the U.S. Telephone Association, said yesterday. The association represents local telephone companies.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 2003
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Sprint Corp. introduced bundled local, long-distance and wireless calling plans in Maryland and 35 other states yesterday to gain a bigger share of the local-phone business. Sprint, which is seeking to boost revenue while sales fall at its long-distance telephone business, will target a local-phone campaign to its millions of wireless and land-line customers. The company's promotion campaign includes advertisements in bill inserts and telemarketing calls. They will be promoting bundled call plans with unlimited minutes.
NEWS
June 12, 2000
WITHOUT even responding to the nickel-and-dime advertising come-ons of telephone companies, consumers soon should see lower long-distance bills. We say should because phone companies invariably seem to find ways to jack up our bills even as they publicize lower rates. That's what happened this month when AT&T Corp. tried to raise its per-minute rates right after it joined the Federal Communications Commission in announcing a multibillion-dollar cut in basic long-distance charges. The FCC then jawboned AT&T into withdrawing the planned per-minute hikes.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 31, 2002
NEW YORK -AT&T Corp., the biggest U.S. long-distance telephone company, posted a 9.5 percent decline in fourth-quarter sales yesterday, saying it lost customers to competitors and phone use fell after job cuts at U.S. companies. The fourth-quarter loss narrowed to $1.39 billion, or 39 cents a share, from $1.64 billion, or 45 cents, in the fourth quarter of 2000. Sales fell to $12.6 billion from $13.9 billion. Total expenses fell 32 percent to $12.4 billion. AT&T's consumer long-distance revenue tumbled 18.3 percent to $3.47 billion, and calling volume fell as regional phone companies such as Verizon Communications Inc. entered the U.S. long-distance market and consumers relied more on mobile phones and e-mail.
NEWS
June 12, 2000
WITHOUT even responding to the nickel-and-dime advertising come-ons of telephone companies, consumers soon should see lower long-distance bills. We say should because phone companies invariably seem to find ways to jack up our bills even as they publicize lower rates. That's what happened this month when AT&T Corp. tried to raise its per-minute rates right after it joined the Federal Communications Commission in announcing a multibillion-dollar cut in basic long-distance charges. The FCC then jawboned AT&T into withdrawing the planned per-minute hikes.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- MCI WorldCom Inc., the No. 2 U.S. long-distance telephone company, won federal approval yesterday for its $1.75 billion purchase of SkyTel Communications Inc., the second-largest paging company.The Federal Communications Commission ruled that the transaction would benefit the public.Shareholders of Jackson, Miss.-based SkyTel will vote on the acquisition Sept. 29. The transaction is expected to be completed Oct. 1.MCI WorldCom, based in Clinton, Miss., will gain 1.6 million customers and a paging network to offer e-mail and other data services.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 26, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, clearing the way for a major restructuring of the telephone industry and maybe a price break for consumers, approved a sweeping opportunity yesterday for the nation's long-distance companies to compete for local phone business.By a 5-3 vote, the court approved broad new power for the Federal Communications Commission to oversee local competition, including authority to select a pricing method for the charges new competitors will pay to use local companies' existing facilities and services.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
When Congress passed last year's landmark telecommunications reform law, advocates said consumers' biggest short-term savings would come when regulators tackled what long-distance companies and consumer groups call the biggest piece of fat in the phone system -- the fees that long-distance carriers pay the Baby Bells to connect calls to their networks. But the Federal Communications Commission's order on so-called access charges is expected for Wednesday, and now it looks as if many of the promises will prove to be wrong, or at least overly optimistic.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
Rates for long-distance calls within Maryland will fall by 17 percent or more beginning today, after state regulators gave final blessing yesterday to Bell Atlantic Corp.'s plan to cut the fees it charges long-distance carriers to help them complete calls.The plan approved by the state Public Service Commission was a blueprint for implementing the PSC's earlier order that Bell Atlantic cut so-called access charges by $32.1 million. Those charges represent as much as 45 percent of the cost of completing a long-distance call, said Joan Marshall, president of AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a battle of two titans in the telecommunications industry, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. moved yesterday to block Britain's biggest phone company from gaining broader access to the U.S. market until AT&T is allowed to compete in Britain.Both AT&T and British Telecommunications PLC want to provide everything from phone service to high-speed data transmission and video services to multinational companies. These private global corporate networks represent one of the hottest segments of the telecommunications industry, and all the world's phone giants are vying for the business.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The FCC has given Bell Atlantic and the nation's seven other big providers of local telephone service greater freedom to raise or lower the prices they charge long-distance carriers for completing interstate calls.The move signals a fundamental shift in the economic philosophy of U.S. regulation. The charges account for about half the cost of placing a long-distance call.But the Federal Communications Commission declined to estimate the effect of yesterday's decision on long-distance carriers, and ultimately on consumers, because the charges will now depend more closely on the productivity of the local telephone companies.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1997
MCI Communications Corp. said it will cut its rates for long-distance calls within Maryland by 17 percent, making its announcement one business day after state phone regulators denied Bell Atlantic Corp.'s bid to delay a $32 million cut in charges that long-distance carriers such as MCI pay it to use its local lines.MCI's rate cut effectively matches a cut offered last month by AT&T Corp., which, like MCI and other long-distance companies, is moving to pass along its savings from the cut in fees they pay Bell Atlantic to carry long-distance calls from customers' homes and offices out to long-distance carriers' networks.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1996
AT&T Corp. will cut rates on long-distance calls within Maryland by 10 percent or more, passing along the state-ordered cut in the charges AT&T pays Bell Atlantic Corp. to connect calls from customers' homes or offices to the long-distance company's network.AT&T's filing with the Public Service Commission, expected tomorrow, could mean a cut of $15 million to $20 million in the rates AT&T charges for long-distance services within Maryland. That business was $143 million in the 12 months that ended in June.
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