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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 7, 1995
A long-running "war of confusion" in the long-distance telephone business turned into an old-fashioned price war this week as MCI and Sprint weighed in with aggressive responses to AT&T's recent gains.The new outbreak of price-cutting took a toll on the stocks of AT&T Corp. and MCI Communications Corp. yesterday, with market leader AT&T dropping $1.375, to close at $48.25, and No. 2 MCI dropping 93.75 cents, to close at $18.06. But No. 3 Sprint, which surprised the industry with a bold flat-rate plan, recovered from early losses and gained 50 cents, to wind up at $27.125.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Date: June 14 Her story: Jannette Merritt, 31, grew up in Owings Mills. She is a technical accounts manager at Livefyre, a social content sharing company, in its New York City office. Her father, Otis Merritt III, a retired warden of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, and stepmother, Clarice Paschall , live in Baltimore. Her mother, Marlene Merritt-Hall, and stepfather, Charles Hall, live in Myrtle Beach, S.C. His story: Michael Phillips, 40, grew up in Queens, N.Y. He is a network engineer for Collective, an online audience targeting company based in New York City.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | June 20, 1996
ATLANTA -- BellSouth Corp., in a first for a Baby Bell, said yesterday that it agreed to buy time on AT&T Corp.'s long-distance network.The three-year agreement, which brings BellSouth one step closer to providing long-distance phone services in its local phone markets, means that BellSouth won't team up with two other Baby Bells -- SBC Communications Inc. and Pacific Telesis Group -- to jointly buy long-distance time.It also means that BellSouth will be competing against AT&T in the $70 billion-a-year U.S. long-distance market in its Southeast region at the same time it is an AT&T long-distance customer.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
After a 17-point showing in which he hit three of four 3-pointers in Towson's 95-75 rout of visiting Morgan State at SECU Arena on Tuesday night, no one would have argued if Marcus Damas wanted to chirp about his improved long-range touch. But the senior forward kept humble. “I think it can be anybody else in here on any given day, because we're that type of team,” he said. If the 6-foot-7, 210-pound Damas wasn't willing to elaborate on his shooting prowess, his teammate, sophomore point guard Jerome Hairston, was. Hairston said an arm injury prevented Damas from getting too involved in summer workouts, so Damas took throughout much of his recovery instead.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | June 9, 1997
A NEW DEAL between the government and the major telephone companies promises to cut your long-distance telephone bill. Target date: July 1.But you don't have to wait until then to reduce the charges you pay. Odds are, there's an even cheaper plan right under your nose, which you can get with a single telephone call.The July 1 rate cuts are part of an agreement between AT&T and the Federal Communications Commission.Because of the restructuring of local and long-distance service, long-distance carriers will reap an estimated $1.7 billion windfall this year.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
When legislators created the Telecommunications Act of 1996, they viewed the world of local vs. long-distance communications as all there was: a pair of different animals that needed to be taught how to play well together. They didn't see that technology would come along - as it so often does - to make all their efforts moot. Cable and wireless companies sneaked into the market while traditional land-line phone companies, cousins by comparison, were busy arguing over sharing their equipment, as the act required.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is close to recommending that a regional Bell telephone company be allowed to enter the long-distance industry for the first time since the government forced the breakup of the Bell System more than a decade ago.People familiar with the proposal, which would require the approval of a federal judge, say it would allow Ameritech Corp. to offer long-distance service to customers in metropolitan Chicago.In return, the company would be required to open its local-telephone business in the area to full competition by other telecommunications companies.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
Maryland and 24 other states told the Federal Communications Commission yesterday that it is too soft on the fast-growing number of small, high-priced long-distance companies that use tricky or high-pressure "slamming" gimmicks switch unwary customers to their phone services.The state attorneys general asked the FCC to reconsider -- and greatly toughen -- rules scheduled to go into effect Sept. 11 against deceptive and unauthorized switches, known in the business as "telephone slamming." "There is a rapidly growing problem of very aggressive entrepreneurs trying to capture long-distance business by less than upfront means," said Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., one of the signers of the request to the FCC. The problem has mushroomed so rapidly that the FCC, which received 1,700 complaints in 1993 and 2,500 last year, expects to receive as many as 10,000 this year at current rates, said Susan Salet, a commission spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 1995
The Justice Department announced yesterday the details of a proposal that would allow a regional Bell company to offer long-distance telephone service to customers in parts of Illinois and Michigan.But the other six Baby Bells immediately criticized the plan, saying that it would impede -- rather than accelerate -- the entry of local phone companies into the $66 billion long-distance business.According to the plan, which was announced by Attorney General Janet Reno and must be approved by a federal judge, Ameritech Corp.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1998
Would you listen to a 15-second advertisement in order to make a free two-minute long-distance phone call?BroadPoint Communications Inc. of Landover is betting that enough of you would, and is launching its service in Pittsburgh this week with "thousands" of subscribers. A Baltimore rollout could come this summer.But before you bid good riddance to long-distance bills, be aware that -- surprise -- there are strings attached.Before using BroadPoint's service, you'll have to register at the company's World Wide Web site and give up personal information, such as household income, number of children and ethnic background.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Spring stirs pollen, and also dust - high-flying dust that's blown thousands of miles to reach North America in greater amounts than scientists have known before, with potential impact on the climate and air quality. Mineral dust rises from dry expanses in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, rides upper atmospheric winds for days across the Pacific Ocean to the West Coast of the United States and beyond. More than two miles up, it can reach Maryland, where scientists at College Park, Greenbelt and Catonsville have been tracking its global travels with satellite-based instruments in a way they say is more accurate and covers a longer period of time than previous studies.
FEATURES
By Olivia Hubert-Allen, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Hello, Baltimore. I'm the newest writer on the Married in Maryland blog, and will be chronicling my journey from girlfriend to wife. I'm sure I'll use my space here to talk about centerpieces, dresses, guest lists and all that gooey wedding stuff - - but I hope I'll also remember to focus on the non-material things that being engaged is also about.  I thought to kick things off I'd tell you my engagement story, which is still fresh in my mind as it was only a few weeks ago. But quickly, the back story: I'd been dating my boyfriend Sam for over a decade, and many of those years were long distance.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 21, 2012
Wide receiver Torrey Smith, kicker Justin Tucker and punter Sam Koch were three of several Ravens players summoned to coach John Harbaugh's office Wednesday morning, but they weren't in trouble. Eight players and Harbaugh convened in the coach's office to wish a happy Thanksgiving via Skype to an Army National Guard unit currently serving in Afghanistan. Harbaugh, Smith, Tucker, Koch, linebackers Josh Bynes and Nigel Carr, long snapper Morgan Cox, safety Omar Brown and guard Antoine McClain spoke to the unit, which is based in Laurel, for about nine minutes on Harbaugh's iPad and listened to the soldiers recount their experiences in Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Haller and Chris Kinling | September 11, 2012
Tonight the 2012 Bachelor series trifecta comes to an end with what Chris Harrison describes as the "most shocking and most disturbing 'Bachelor Pad' finale. " We've laughed and we've cried (because we were laughing so hard), but we couldn't be happier to say goodbye to these fools. Ray Lewis would be ashamed if he knew what we were doing right now. We currently have two televisions set up in our living room -- one on mute with the Ravens game and the other with "Bachelor Pad. " We can't wait to see who wins on both screens!
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Growing up in Bethesda, Giuliana Rancic thought there was nothing more glamorous than the news women she saw on TV. First at the University of Maryland, College Park, then at graduate school in Washington, she trained to join their ranks, heading with mike and camera to the White House, Pentagon and Capitol Hill. But there was a problem. "I couldn't bring myself to report the news straight," Rancic remembers. "I liked asking senators not just, what do you think of a policy, but what do you do for fun, what's your favorite movie.
NEWS
Kevin Van Valkenburg | November 17, 2011
Ravens coach John Harbaugh is a big believer in using stats to help him make decisions in the kicking game. He likes to know prior to the start of every game exactly what distance his kicker has been hitting from during warm-ups. He isn't interested in what a kicker's career best is, he wants to know how he's doing on a specific and in specific conditions. So when he heard Billy Cundiff was kicking 58-yard field goals going both directions prior to the Ravens game against Seattle, Harbaugh felt good about calling on Cundiff to hit a long field goal.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Cellular One may begin by the end of the year to offer long-distance service over noncellular phones, the parent company of the Greenbelt-based firm said yesterday.SBC Communications Inc. of San Antonio, which owns Southwestern Bell, said its entry into the long-distance market under the Cellular One name is a bid to capitalize on the reputation the cellular company has built in parts of the nation where Southwestern Bell is nearly unknown."We're going to focus a lot of efforts on building this and on speaking to customers who understand what the brand name means," SBC spokesman Andy Craig said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1999
Just when you thought life was complicated enough, there is now a bewildering and ever-expanding array of long-distance telephone plans for you to consider. In an effort to win a larger share of the $80 billion long-distance telephone market, carriers have been trotting out one new offer after another. Sprint Corp. announced in July that it would have 5-cents-per-minute calling during evenings, 10 cents per minute at other times of day. Soon after, MCI WorldCom Inc. unveiled its own nickel-a-minute plan for evenings and weekends, with weekday rates ranging from a dime to a quarter per minute.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 14, 2011
For the season, Ravens kicker Billy Cundiff has converted 21-of-27 field goals, which isn't bad. But he is just 1-of-6 from 50 yards or beyond - including two misses in the team's 22-17 loss to the Seattle Seahawks Sunday. Cundiff has never missed more than two attempts from 50 yards or more in his career, which is why he did not sound happy after the game. “That's my job,” he said. “My job is to make kicks, and I haven't done that.” Cundiff said swirling winds at CenturyLink Field played a role in his two misses Sunday.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 18, 2011
Since missing his only two field goals of the season in the Ravens' 37-7 rout of the St. Louis Rams on Sept. 25, kicker Billy Cundiff has been perfect, converting all 10 attempts since then. But Cundiff, who represented the AFC in last year's Pro Bowl, said his recent run of success is not connected with making any changes. “I really didn't feel like I've made a mental adjustment at all,” he said. “It was a 51-yard field goal. If you look at my stats over the last two years, most of my misses have come from long range.
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