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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 16, 2008
Lois K. Pilla, a former bank employee and longtime Homeland resident, died of breast cancer Sept. 8 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 65. Lois K. Yates was born in Philadelphia and raised in Merion, Pa. After graduating from Harriton High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in English from Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pa. After her 1965 marriage to Kenneth J. Pilla, an attorney, the couple settled in Homeland. Mrs. Pilla worked as a credit investigator for Household Finance and later was a sales associate at Hess Shoes.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 16, 2008
Lois K. Pilla, a former bank employee and longtime Homeland resident, died of breast cancer Sept. 8 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 65. Lois K. Yates was born in Philadelphia and raised in Merion, Pa. After graduating from Harriton High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in English from Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pa. After her 1965 marriage to Kenneth J. Pilla, an attorney, the couple settled in Homeland. Mrs. Pilla worked as a credit investigator for Household Finance and later was a sales associate at Hess Shoes.
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NEWS
September 8, 1996
LONG BEACH ISLAND, N.J. -- Blue-green algae have decided to have a population boom along the New Jersey shore.While some forms of algae are toxic to fish and humans, the current culprit - known in the science world as Gyrodinium aureolum - won't harm finned or limbed swimmers, at least in this part of the world. Still, some people can suffer skin irritation."It tends to feel sticky or clingy," said Dave Rosenblatt, an environmental specialist with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Cross-Barnet and Michael Cross-Barnet,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
Long Beach Island's charms have long been familiar to vacationers from New York and Philadelphia. LBI - as it is universally called - is less well-known to Marylanders. But don't be daunted by the nearly four-hour drive from Baltimore. Whether you prefer lying on a pristine beach or boating on a serene bay, enjoying a hopping nightlife or an endless variety of activities for kids, LBI's got the goods. This place has pulled off a neat trick: Despite being highly popular, it has somehow avoided the tackiness that envelops so many beach communities.
NEWS
By Lisa W. Foderaro and Lisa W. Foderaro,New York Times News Service | September 5, 1999
LOVELADIES, N.J. -- When Carrie and David Harmon went out to the Hamptons in their pre-parenthood years, David Harmon packed a blue blazer, khakis and a pair of bucks, and the couple, both lawyers, typically ate at expensive places like the Palm restaurant.When they made the switch to the Jersey Shore three years ago, he left the blazer at home but brought the khakis and bucks. This summer, for their two-week vacation in this Long Beach Island community, where soaring contemporary homes rise from the dunes, his wardrobe consisted of shorts and T-shirts.
NEWS
By RANDY KRAFT and RANDY KRAFT,ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL | August 24, 1997
Visitors have been coming to the New Jersey shore for generations to gaze in awe at the Atlantic Ocean, and now Ocean and Monmouth counties - the state's Shore Region - are drawing people who plan to live there.Money magazine recently listed the two counties among the most desirable places to live in the United States in its 11thannual survey of the 300 largest metropolitan areas.Because of the magazine's ranking, "people are relocating to us big time," said Patricia Padula, tourism representative for Monmouth County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Cross-Barnet and Michael Cross-Barnet,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
Long Beach Island's charms have long been familiar to vacationers from New York and Philadelphia. LBI - as it is universally called - is less well-known to Marylanders. But don't be daunted by the nearly four-hour drive from Baltimore. Whether you prefer lying on a pristine beach or boating on a serene bay, enjoying a hopping nightlife or an endless variety of activities for kids, LBI's got the goods. This place has pulled off a neat trick: Despite being highly popular, it has somehow avoided the tackiness that envelops so many beach communities.
NEWS
By Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood and Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood,Knight Ridder /Tribune | April 2, 2000
Thirty-eight years ago this spring, the most devastating coastal storm in New Jersey history inundated Long Beach Island, drowning seven people, uprooting 600 houses and tearing the slender barrier island into six pieces. Along the Eastern Seaboard, from North Carolina to New York, the great Ash Wednesday Storm of 1962 killed 22 people, pounded 50,000 houses and left $1.3 billion in damage. So shocking was the destruction that state and federal officials suggested the unthinkable: restoring the vulnerable shoreline to its natural state -- a buffer zone off-limits to risky development.
NEWS
July 28, 2003
Jane Barbe, 74, whose voice was familiar to millions of telephone users across the country who ever dialed a wrong number or had to "Please listen to the following options" in a voice-mail system, died July 18 in Roswell, Ga., of complications from cancer. Mrs. Barbe was the queen of telephone recordings. Her friendly but authoritative voice was heard an estimated 40 million times a day in the 1980s and early 1990s on everything from automated time and weather messages to hotel wake-up calls.
FEATURES
By Gloria Hayes Kremer and Gloria Hayes Kremer,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1992
For many of us, the magic spell of the beach begins when we're young and only gets stronger as time goes by. Nothing is more fun than to plan a day or weekend at the shore -- or more refreshing to the body and soul.Fortunately, there are beaches for all tastes. Some like a quiet, dune-backed beach on Nantucket, Mass. Others prefer the bustle of Ocean City. Many seek the peaceful pleasures of Delaware's Bethany Beach or Fenwick Island.Some beach lovers feel the ultimate way of life is a home right on the beach.
NEWS
July 28, 2003
Jane Barbe, 74, whose voice was familiar to millions of telephone users across the country who ever dialed a wrong number or had to "Please listen to the following options" in a voice-mail system, died July 18 in Roswell, Ga., of complications from cancer. Mrs. Barbe was the queen of telephone recordings. Her friendly but authoritative voice was heard an estimated 40 million times a day in the 1980s and early 1990s on everything from automated time and weather messages to hotel wake-up calls.
NEWS
By Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood and Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood,Knight Ridder /Tribune | April 2, 2000
Thirty-eight years ago this spring, the most devastating coastal storm in New Jersey history inundated Long Beach Island, drowning seven people, uprooting 600 houses and tearing the slender barrier island into six pieces. Along the Eastern Seaboard, from North Carolina to New York, the great Ash Wednesday Storm of 1962 killed 22 people, pounded 50,000 houses and left $1.3 billion in damage. So shocking was the destruction that state and federal officials suggested the unthinkable: restoring the vulnerable shoreline to its natural state -- a buffer zone off-limits to risky development.
NEWS
By Lisa W. Foderaro and Lisa W. Foderaro,New York Times News Service | September 5, 1999
LOVELADIES, N.J. -- When Carrie and David Harmon went out to the Hamptons in their pre-parenthood years, David Harmon packed a blue blazer, khakis and a pair of bucks, and the couple, both lawyers, typically ate at expensive places like the Palm restaurant.When they made the switch to the Jersey Shore three years ago, he left the blazer at home but brought the khakis and bucks. This summer, for their two-week vacation in this Long Beach Island community, where soaring contemporary homes rise from the dunes, his wardrobe consisted of shorts and T-shirts.
NEWS
By RANDY KRAFT and RANDY KRAFT,ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL | August 24, 1997
Visitors have been coming to the New Jersey shore for generations to gaze in awe at the Atlantic Ocean, and now Ocean and Monmouth counties - the state's Shore Region - are drawing people who plan to live there.Money magazine recently listed the two counties among the most desirable places to live in the United States in its 11thannual survey of the 300 largest metropolitan areas.Because of the magazine's ranking, "people are relocating to us big time," said Patricia Padula, tourism representative for Monmouth County.
NEWS
September 8, 1996
LONG BEACH ISLAND, N.J. -- Blue-green algae have decided to have a population boom along the New Jersey shore.While some forms of algae are toxic to fish and humans, the current culprit - known in the science world as Gyrodinium aureolum - won't harm finned or limbed swimmers, at least in this part of the world. Still, some people can suffer skin irritation."It tends to feel sticky or clingy," said Dave Rosenblatt, an environmental specialist with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
FEATURES
By Gloria Hayes Kremer and Gloria Hayes Kremer,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1992
For many of us, the magic spell of the beach begins when we're young and only gets stronger as time goes by. Nothing is more fun than to plan a day or weekend at the shore -- or more refreshing to the body and soul.Fortunately, there are beaches for all tastes. Some like a quiet, dune-backed beach on Nantucket, Mass. Others prefer the bustle of Ocean City. Many seek the peaceful pleasures of Delaware's Bethany Beach or Fenwick Island.Some beach lovers feel the ultimate way of life is a home right on the beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS and BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTER | March 30, 2006
Snowboarding is a sport synonymous with cold weather. But what about the boarders who just say "no" to snow? For them, summer lasts all year long -- even when temperatures fall. Hardcore surfers suit up, paddle out and catch waves in the dead of winter and in early spring, when the white powder just won't do. Winter surf spots Cape May, N.J. -- Long Beach Island, N.J. -- Ocean City, N.J. -- Fenwick Island, Del. -- Indian River Inlet, Del. -- Ocean City (48th Street for more serious surfers, 30th Street for beginners)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erica Kritt | June 30, 2005
NOW OR NEVER The center of Baltimore's tourism industry, Harborplace, is celebrating its 25th birthday with a two-day celebration beginning tomorrow. A parade along the harbor will kick things off at 11 a.m. Street performers will show off their talents in the Harborplace Amphitheatre. Saturday there will be a family celebration at the Light Street Pavilion. Tomorrow and Saturday's events will run 11 a.m.-11 p.m. All events are free. Call 410-332-4191. --Erica Kritt COMING UP Marilyn Monroe once sang, "A kiss on the hand may be quite continental, but diamonds are a girl's best friend," and her diamonds and jewels will be on display at this weekend's International Gem and Jewelry Show.
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