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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
With two home runs in Wednesday's 6-4 loss to Cleveland, the Orioles lead the majors with 185 homers, but is the Orioles offense too reliant on the home run to score? On Wednesday, all four runs were scored on homers by Adam Jones and Manny Machado. Meanwhile, the Orioles were just 1-for-8 with runners in scoring position, the sole hit being Machado's three-run, game-tying homer in the fifth. Their past 11 runs have all been scored on home runs, as have 17 of their past 21 and 19 of 26 dating back to Aug. 30. Over their three games in Cleveland, the Orioles were 4-for-27 with runners in scoring position.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
With two home runs in Wednesday's 6-4 loss to Cleveland, the Orioles lead the majors with 185 homers, but is the Orioles offense too reliant on the home run to score? On Wednesday, all four runs were scored on homers by Adam Jones and Manny Machado. Meanwhile, the Orioles were just 1-for-8 with runners in scoring position, the sole hit being Machado's three-run, game-tying homer in the fifth. Their past 11 runs have all been scored on home runs, as have 17 of their past 21 and 19 of 26 dating back to Aug. 30. Over their three games in Cleveland, the Orioles were 4-for-27 with runners in scoring position.
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By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | September 20, 2005
The summer seemed so iconic. Huge men hit balls to places kids had heard about only in tall tales spun by Grandpa. Every day it seemed, Mark McGwire or Sammy Sosa did something those kids would be able to tell their own grandchildren about. And it was all wrapped in that blessed nugget of Nike attitude: "Chicks dig the long ball." Barry Bonds only upped the ante three years later, in 2001, when he hit 73 homers and began mounting the first serious challenge to Hank Aaron's 755. The popularity of the game seemed indistinguishable from the popularity of the home run. But four years later, memories of those heady days are shrouded in ambivalence.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2013
Shortstop Yunel Escobar and second baseman Ryan Roberts hit back-to-back home runs off Orioles left-hander Brian Matusz in the fourth inning on Saturday as the Tampa Bay Rays defeated the Orioles, 4-1, at Charlotte Sports Park. Those were the only hits Matusz surrendered over two innings after coming on in relief of starting pitcher Wei-Yin Chen, who needed just 23 pitches to complete two scoreless innings in his 2013 Grapefruit League debut. "[For my] spring debut this year, I feel pretty satisfied for today," Chen said through interpreter Tim Lin. The Orioles scored their only run of the game in the sixth inning when third baseman Manny Machado tripled off Rays pitcher Josh Lueke and outfielder Jason Pridie drove him home with a sharp single up the middle.
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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
Kansas City Royals first baseman Billy Butler cost Brad Bergesen the last two months of his rookie season and a possible run at the American League Rookie of the Year award when he nailed the Orioles starter in the left leg with a line drive. Exactly a year and one day since that injury, which took the young pitcher months to recover from, Butler cost Bergesen a long-awaited victory that he deserved. Asked to protect a one-run lead in the eighth inning, David Hernandez served up a tape-measure two-run homer to Butler, who sent the Royals to a 4-3 victory Saturday night in a brisk two hours, nine minutes in front of an announced 25,055 at Kauffman Stadium.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The Orioles sent a powerful message - literally and figuratively - to the Yankeesin their thrilling 10-6 win at Camden Yardslast night. Mixed in with the usual smells of sweat, sunflower seeds and bubble-gum in the Orioles' dugout was the overpowering scent of testosterone. A six-home-run barrage - the most homers by the O's in a game in over five years  - left Yankees pitchers muttering to themselves. And three blasts in the eighth inning by Adam Jones, sizzling Mark Reynolds and Chris Davis - the last on a swing  so relaxed I thought he was falling asleep - sent the sellout crowd into a delirious celebration.
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December 24, 1991
Orioles first baseman Glenn Davis presented a check for $10,000 -- representing $1,000 for each of the home runs he hit this past season -- to four local charities yesterday.The charities are The Door, a community-based family center and ministry run by former Colts lineman Joe Ehrmann, the Maryland Food Bank, the Maryland Special Olympics and the House of Ruth, a home for battered women and children.In addition to his pledge of $1,000 for every home run, Davis contributed more than $20,000 worth of Orioles game tickets that were distributed to needy children.
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By DAVID STEELE | July 12, 2007
Just one more reason baseball deserves all the angst it's getting right now: All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Ichiro Suzuki. Nobody in Tuesday's game in San Francisco was more fun to watch play than Ichiro. Nothing that happened during the two days of festivities was more electrifying than his dash around the bases for the first inside-the-park home run in 78 All-Star games spanning 75 years. The next most spine-tingling moment? Willie Mays' entrance. One master of the art of playing every facet of baseball brilliantly - not just power-hitting, everything - preceding a modern master of the practically lost art of small ball, baseball minus the power hitting.
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By Bill Tanton | April 16, 1991
Six games into the season it's already clear that the Orioles are going to rely on home runs for their offense.The O's have hit seven of them -- all in the last three games -- and scored all their runs yesterday on homers in a 7-2 win at Milwaukee. Sam Horn, who hit his third career grand slam, has two home runs and seven runs batted in -- yet he's batting only .143.The O's saw something else yesterday that makes them feel better. Chris Hoiles, who caught the game, is a good hitter but there have been questions about his arm. Twice Milwaukee tried steal on Hoiles.
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By Tom Reed, The Plain Dealer | September 25, 2012
Brandon Weeden has shown the ability to throw the deep ball, but completing it is another matter. Since his second pass of the season sailed over the head of a streaking Mohamed Massaquoi, the Browns' rookie quarterback has struggled with his long throws, particularly to the right side of the field. Weeden did not complete a pass on four tries down the right side Sunday that traveled 21-plus yards, according to The Plain Dealer's Dennis Manoloff, who is charting all the quarterback's passes this season.
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By Edward Lee | January 7, 2013
Tandon Doss doesn't get as much playing time as other wide receivers in the Ravens offense. But that didn't prevent him from chiding himself for dropping two balls in the end zone in Sunday's 24-9 win against the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC Wildcard playoff round. On second down-and-goal from Indianapolis' 5-yard line in the second quarter, Doss ran an in route from the left side of the formation, but quarterback Joe Flacco's pass glanced off Doss' hands as he dove at the goal line.
SPORTS
By Tom Reed, The Plain Dealer | September 25, 2012
Brandon Weeden has shown the ability to throw the deep ball, but completing it is another matter. Since his second pass of the season sailed over the head of a streaking Mohamed Massaquoi, the Browns' rookie quarterback has struggled with his long throws, particularly to the right side of the field. Weeden did not complete a pass on four tries down the right side Sunday that traveled 21-plus yards, according to The Plain Dealer's Dennis Manoloff, who is charting all the quarterback's passes this season.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The Orioles sent a powerful message - literally and figuratively - to the Yankeesin their thrilling 10-6 win at Camden Yardslast night. Mixed in with the usual smells of sweat, sunflower seeds and bubble-gum in the Orioles' dugout was the overpowering scent of testosterone. A six-home-run barrage - the most homers by the O's in a game in over five years  - left Yankees pitchers muttering to themselves. And three blasts in the eighth inning by Adam Jones, sizzling Mark Reynolds and Chris Davis - the last on a swing  so relaxed I thought he was falling asleep - sent the sellout crowd into a delirious celebration.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 20, 2011
The Orioles arrived at Angel Stadium this afternoon relaxed and rested, buoyed by a rare day off and a pleasant interruption from a season that can't end soon enough. But approximately 15 minutes – or exactly 22 pitches – into their series opener against the Los Angeles Angels, the familiar feeling of frustration and despair had resurfaced. That will happen when your starting pitcher allows the first four hitters that he faces to reach base, and needs just 12 pitches to put his team in a four-run hole.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
Kansas City Royals first baseman Billy Butler cost Brad Bergesen the last two months of his rookie season and a possible run at the American League Rookie of the Year award when he nailed the Orioles starter in the left leg with a line drive. Exactly a year and one day since that injury, which took the young pitcher months to recover from, Butler cost Bergesen a long-awaited victory that he deserved. Asked to protect a one-run lead in the eighth inning, David Hernandez served up a tape-measure two-run homer to Butler, who sent the Royals to a 4-3 victory Saturday night in a brisk two hours, nine minutes in front of an announced 25,055 at Kauffman Stadium.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - - The Tampa Bay Rays entered Tuesday night having hit the third most home runs in the American League. They were facing an Orioles pitching staff that had served up more long balls than any other AL club and second most in the majors. The two worlds collided, and the result was a 5-4 Rays win that was paced by three Tampa Bay home runs against Orioles starter Jason Berken. "The thing that was rough for me about this game is that it seemed like every mistake Berken made, they hit out," Orioles pitching coach Rick Kranitz said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 20, 2011
The Orioles arrived at Angel Stadium this afternoon relaxed and rested, buoyed by a rare day off and a pleasant interruption from a season that can't end soon enough. But approximately 15 minutes – or exactly 22 pitches – into their series opener against the Los Angeles Angels, the familiar feeling of frustration and despair had resurfaced. That will happen when your starting pitcher allows the first four hitters that he faces to reach base, and needs just 12 pitches to put his team in a four-run hole.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun Reporter | November 5, 2006
Before Chad Johnson uttered an inflammatory word, the Ravens' defense already had a steely look of determination. Today's pivotal AFC North showdown with the Cincinnati Bengals represents an opportunity for the Ravens' secondary to restore its confidence and reputation for this season and beyond. Bengals@Ravens Today, 1 p.m., Ch. 13, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Ravens by 3
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
ANAHEIM, Calif. - -It seems like whenever Jeremy Guthrie pitches these days, he walks a fine line, one pitch here or there deciding his outing. On Thursday, it was actually two pitches that he made to Bobby Abreu, a batter Guthrie normally handles, that cost the Orioles the game. Abreu, who entered the game with just two hits in 15 career at-bats against Guthrie and four homers all season, hit a solo shot in the fourth inning and a three-run blast in the fifth as the Los Angeles Angels took the series opener, 5-2, in front of an announced 39,180 at Angel Stadium.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | July 12, 2007
Just one more reason baseball deserves all the angst it's getting right now: All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Ichiro Suzuki. Nobody in Tuesday's game in San Francisco was more fun to watch play than Ichiro. Nothing that happened during the two days of festivities was more electrifying than his dash around the bases for the first inside-the-park home run in 78 All-Star games spanning 75 years. The next most spine-tingling moment? Willie Mays' entrance. One master of the art of playing every facet of baseball brilliantly - not just power-hitting, everything - preceding a modern master of the practically lost art of small ball, baseball minus the power hitting.
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