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Loneliness

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By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2008
"I'll be home for Christmas - if only in my dreams." Long derided as wimpy and a waste of time, nostalgia nonetheless often sweeps in this time of year and settles in for the holidays. In calling up memories of people and celebrations past, it can evoke feelings buried by time and daily life. Now psychologists are rethinking the purpose of that peculiar sentiment - and are drawing some surprising conclusions. Depending on how it's embraced, they say, nostalgia can be a healthy emotion that buffers people from loneliness and eases them through hard times.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
It's not that Muhammad Shumri imagined building a new life in Baltimore would be easy. But he didn't expect it to be so hard. The 48-year-old physician was a high-ranking official in the Iraqi Ministry of Health when a photograph that placed him at a meeting with U.S. officials was stolen from his computer. Soon he was receiving anonymous threats warning him to stop working with the Americans. He moved his wife and five children out of Iraq, traveled alone to the United States and requested asylum.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 1998
In the first concentrated study of the social and psychological effects of Internet use at home, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have found that people who spend even a few hours a week online experience higher levels of depression and loneliness than they would have if they used the computer network less frequently.Those participants who were lonelier and more depressed at the start of the two-year study, as determined by a standard questionnaire, were not more likely to use the Internet.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2008
"I'll be home for Christmas - if only in my dreams." Long derided as wimpy and a waste of time, nostalgia nonetheless often sweeps in this time of year and settles in for the holidays. In calling up memories of people and celebrations past, it can evoke feelings buried by time and daily life. Now psychologists are rethinking the purpose of that peculiar sentiment - and are drawing some surprising conclusions. Depending on how it's embraced, they say, nostalgia can be a healthy emotion that buffers people from loneliness and eases them through hard times.
NEWS
By Gary Gately | December 3, 1990
In the dining area, a sun-splashed room full of wooden tables, 18 elderly women sit looking at nothing in particular. Their limbs splayed as in a Picasso painting, some look as though they would tumble onto the floor but for the thick straps holding them in their wheelchairs.Their heads, cocked at hard angles, rest against their chests, as if their neck muscles had ceased functioning long ago.Nobody talks.Down the hall, in one of the rooms with bare baby-blue walls and a linoleum floor, a man moans incessantly, a longing, desperate moan.
TOPIC
By Gwinn Owens | November 19, 2000
ON THE BASIS of James J. Lynch's analysis of the statistics, bolstered by his clinical experience, dropping out of school may presage many problems, but the most distressing one has only recently been recognized: school dropouts are inclined to die prematurely. Premature death will, statistically speaking, strike those who lead lonely lives, such as men and women who are single, widowed or divorced. Why? Because loneliness, the absence of daily communication, a sense of failure in life (which is a kind of psychological loneliness)
FEATURES
By Mei-Ling Hopgood and Mei-Ling Hopgood,Knight-Ridder | August 16, 1991
It's a strange kind of best-seller. You can't buy it in a bookstore, though it has sold countless copies. You won't find any high-gloss, racy illustrations to explain its popularity, but the publication does quite well with a simple yellow-striped cardboard cover and a no-nonsense title: "Sex and the Teenager."Who wrote the book of love? Ann Landers.The 38-page booklet, even after 20 years in print, still draws requests whenever it's mentioned at the end of Landers' syndicated column.Sex, of course, is hardly a foreign topic for Landers.
NEWS
By Photos by Karl Merton Ferron and Photos by Karl Merton Ferron,Sun photographer | April 28, 2008
For almost 20 years, Joachim "Mister Jack" Guercio has made regular visits to Cactus Willie's restaurant to dine and play his harmonica. The 92-year-old, who also loves to fish, has outlived his wife and a grandson, and uses his visits to keep loneliness at bay. Guercio says he hopes to live to be 120 years old.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 6, 2007
Of Mice and Men is about the specific loneliness afflicting the inhabitants of hardscrabble landscapes, the kind that hollows you out and crushes you in the middle like a discarded aluminum can. Different manifestations of this isolation come poignantly to life in an affecting production at Olney Theatre Center. If you go Of Mice and Men runs through Oct. 28 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$46. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.
NEWS
By A.M. Chaplin and A.M. Chaplin,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
Are you lonely tonight? Are you sleepless in Seattle, friendless in Frisco or bereft in Baltimore? If so, your health could be in danger, medical research suggests, and not just your mental health. Evidence has been mounting that the lack of social support -- what most people would probably feel as loneliness -- is as bad for your heart as physical inactivity, smoking and obesity. In a study at Duke University, for example, a sobering 50 percent of heart-disease patients who had neither spouse nor confidant were dead within five years of their evaluation at Duke.
NEWS
By Photos by Karl Merton Ferron and Photos by Karl Merton Ferron,Sun photographer | April 28, 2008
For almost 20 years, Joachim "Mister Jack" Guercio has made regular visits to Cactus Willie's restaurant to dine and play his harmonica. The 92-year-old, who also loves to fish, has outlived his wife and a grandson, and uses his visits to keep loneliness at bay. Guercio says he hopes to live to be 120 years old.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | October 14, 2007
Schulz and `Peanuts' A Biography By David Michaelis Harper / 655 pages / $34.95 "Peanuts" was a powerhouse. When its 50-year run ended in 2000 with the death of Charles M. Schulz, the comic strip appeared each week in 2,500 newspapers. Billions of people had watched a "Peanuts" animated television special - and hundreds of millions more had read a "Peanuts" book. Annual merchandising sales around the world exceeded $1 billion. The "Peanuts" gang - Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Schroeder and Snoopy - had become icons of American popular culture.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 6, 2007
Of Mice and Men is about the specific loneliness afflicting the inhabitants of hardscrabble landscapes, the kind that hollows you out and crushes you in the middle like a discarded aluminum can. Different manifestations of this isolation come poignantly to life in an affecting production at Olney Theatre Center. If you go Of Mice and Men runs through Oct. 28 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$46. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | December 22, 2006
Sidney Knighton could have been one of the 88 - the homeless men and women who died this year in Baltimore. It could have been any of us, in a society where so many count on their next paycheck for survival. That was the message last night at the annual Homeless Persons' Memorial Day vigil at War Memorial Plaza, where a crowd of nearly 100 held hands, touched shoulders and told one another, "It could have been me." No job. No money. And not a clean pair of pants to fit his 6-foot-4-inch frame, Knighton said, he sleeps on the stairs of a downtown building and keeps clean using a McDonald's restroom, where he ate his most recent meal of two cheeseburgers and fries on Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 8, 2006
BOSTON -- Long, long ago, I wrote a column describing my mother this way: "My mother is someone who will listen to your problems until you are bored with them." Reader's Digest wanted to use it, and a fact-checker called me for my mother's telephone number. She actually wanted to ask my mother whether it was true. I told this tale for years as a funny story about fact-checkers. But now, of course, I know it was really a story about my mother. About Edith Weinstein Holtz, who died last week at age 92, just two days after Thanksgiving, on what would have been the 70th anniversary of her wedding.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
Babylon and Other Stories Alix Ohlin Knopf / 288 pages / $23.00 Many writers, stalwarts like F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Cheever and Joyce Carol Oates among them, know the secret Alix Ohlin divines in her deft new collection, Babylon and Other Stories: The short story is tailor-made for the theme of alienation. Cheever, for example, defined the suburbs and their sometimes comic, mostly painful alienation; there may never be as perfect a short story about suburban life as The Country Husband.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2002
NORTH MASSAPEQUA, N.Y. - Preoccupied with painting the walls of his bedroom, Randy Earle casually hands his life over to a visitor. He reaches into a box and pulls out a dark brown photo album with a frayed binding. "You can look at this if you want," he says softly. Smiles fill the thick book, and they should, based on the success Earle has had at Farmingdale High, good enough for a full football scholarship to the University of Maryland. But reminders of earlier catastrophe, and not his more apparent blessings, make up much of the album.
NEWS
By Deborah Toich and Deborah Toich,Staff writer | February 14, 1991
When you've spent your entire life taking care of everyone else's needs, what happens when you reach 60 and you have no one to worry about?"Women Over 60 -- Surviving and Thriving" is the name of a program under the supervision of Anne Spear, retired director of the county's Family and Children's Services bureau. Classes are slated to begin at 12:30 p.m Wednesday, Feb. 20, at the Pascal Senior Center."Women in this age group have been caring for others their entirelife, now it's their time," Spear said.
NEWS
May 21, 2006
Contrary to the glamorized accounts we often read about the lives of single women, Amy Fleury, a native of Kansas, presents us with a realistic, affirmative picture. Her poem playfully presents her life as serendipitous, yet she doesn't shy away from acknowledging loneliness. - Ted Kooser "At twenty-Eight" It seems I get by on more luck than sense, not the kind brought on by knuckle to wood, breath on dice, or pennies found in the mud. I shimmy and slip by on pure fool chance. At turns charmed and cursed, a girl knows romance as coffee, red wine, and books; solitude she counts as daylight virtue and muted evenings, the inventory of absence.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 3, 2006
REVIEW B+ Something New is a love story about a woman so busy finding excuses for not falling in love, so busy worrying about what others will think, that she never considers what she thinks. The result for the character is that it takes her forever to recognize the real thing when it comes along. The result for audiences is a gem of a movie that illustrates how the best points are often made with the least hyperbole. True, the movie tackles an important social and cultural issue: interracial dating in a culture where color-blindness is still a far-off goal.
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