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NEWS
June 26, 2011
The so-called "Texas Miracle" of job creation touted by conservative political consultant Brendan Madigan in The Sun ("A Texas solution for Maryland jobs," June 23) is a perfect example of biased reporting. The truth is the Texas unemployment rate went from 7.7 percent to 8 percent over the past decade, the same decade that the total number of jobs in Texas increased. Why did the number of jobs in Texas increase? It certainly was not from any change in government philosophy. This is Bush country after all. The reason Texas saw an increase in the total number of jobs is that its population grew by 20 percent.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 5, 2011
Matt Wieters' selection to next week’s All-Star Game was sweet, sweet redemption for the young catcher, who was labeled as one of the biggest busts in baseball history by Baseball Prospectus before the start of the season -- just his third in the major leagues. That claim was met with criticism in Birdland and beyond, and the Orioles backstop has proved that the rumors of his looming mediocrity were greatly exaggerated. Baseball Prospectus’ belief at the time -- the writer’s name was Steven Goldman -- was that Wieters was never going to be a good enough hitter to live up to the hype that met him when he arrived in the major leagues.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 18, 1997
Interwoven story arcs, shifting time-lines, fine acting and quiet dignity combine to make writer-director John Sayles' "Lone Star" (8: 30 p.m.-11 p.m., Showtime) a don't-miss.Chris Cooper plays Sam Deeds, sheriff of the Texas border town of Frontera. When a decades-old skeleton is found by the nearby Army post, Deeds' job is to find out who it was. He soon suspects it's the remains of Charlie Wade (Kris Kristofferson), a pretty nasty sort who vanished 40 years before -- to be replaced as chief law-keeper by Deeds' father, Buddy (Matthew McConaughey, seen in flashback)
NEWS
June 26, 2011
The so-called "Texas Miracle" of job creation touted by conservative political consultant Brendan Madigan in The Sun ("A Texas solution for Maryland jobs," June 23) is a perfect example of biased reporting. The truth is the Texas unemployment rate went from 7.7 percent to 8 percent over the past decade, the same decade that the total number of jobs in Texas increased. Why did the number of jobs in Texas increase? It certainly was not from any change in government philosophy. This is Bush country after all. The reason Texas saw an increase in the total number of jobs is that its population grew by 20 percent.
NEWS
By Staff report | January 30, 1991
No need to wait for Friday to get started on this weekend's activities.Back-to-back productions of "'Night, Mother," the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by Marsha Norman, and "Lone Star," by James McLure, will be offered by The New Year Theatre Co. in a twin bill at 8 p.m. tomorrowthrough Sunday on the Understage in Alumni Hall, Western Maryland College.The group of 14 Western Maryland College theater students performthe double bill, with the productions being mounted, directed, and produced entirely by students, some of whom will receive college credit.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | February 6, 1991
Coupling Marsha Norman's 1983 Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Night, Mother" with James McLure's relatively obscure "Lone Star" for the Western Maryland College Theatre's first production of 1991 was a capitalidea, and one seldom seen put into practice.Both long, one-act plays offer character studies that leave the audience the opportunity and necessity to fill in the blanks."Night, Mother" begins with a 30-something daughter announcing toher mother that she is going to kill herself. More than an hour later, she does.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 16, 1993
As with any other calling, there's a certain image that goes along with writing mysteries. So if you were a casting director looking for someone to fill the part of a mystery novelist, you'd probably look for a matronly, middle-aged woman who liked cats. Or a white-haired, professorial type with a cardigan and pipe. Or, perhaps, one of those hard-boiled characters who enjoys hanging around cops in their spare time.What you would not want is a mustachioed, cigar-smoking, Stetson-wearing, wisecracking, former country music singer from Texas.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
When you're troubled and lonely in Texas, drink.At least that's the message from James McLure's "Laundry and Bourbon" and "Lone Star," two one-act comedies playing weekends this month at Trifles restaurant in Crownsville.Both are set in a small Texas town in 1972 and center on Elizabeth and Roy Caulder and Roy's pink 1959 Thunderbird convertible. The writing often is clever, and the actors from the newly formed Paragon Theater keep the crowd of 20 or so visitors laughing.But underacting from Jan Kleckner, Elizabeth in "Laundry and Bourbon," made the piece less compelling than it could have been, and an unresolved subplot dragged down "Lone Star."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 19, 1996
It has yet to be determined whether John Sayles is the best novelist directing movies or the best director writing novels, but both talents are on display in "Lone Star," opening today at the Rotunda.The novelist in him drives Sayles to dense plots that evoke real issues of both policy and pain, that evoke complete universes.The director in him keeps his scenes short and pungent, keeps the story moving swiftly with enough grace to sustain the dance of several plot lines while stopping now and then to find a crisp image to express a complex idea.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1997
Sign envy is gripping Columbia.Listen to saloon owner John Heyn, who for years has tried to make a go of it in this tidy planned suburb that boasts some of the strictest sign restrictions in the nation.Every day, residents drive past his Last Chance Saloon -- buried in the courtyard of a neighborhood retail center -- without knowing it's there.Some residents even walk through the courtyard itself without noticing his bar.Life, for Heyn, has no neon.And so as the barkeeper crested a hill along Route 175 on Columbia's eastern edge two months ago, he was shocked to confront -- a half-mile away but very much in his face -- the words "Lone Star Steakhouse & Saloon" illuminating the side of his new competition.
NEWS
By Brendan Madigan | June 22, 2011
A recent article in The Sun noted Maryland's dismal position as last in the nation in terms of the number of jobs created. Of the words that came to my mind, "shocked" was not one of them. Throughout my 2010 campaign for the office of state comptroller, I warned voters of this exact situation. The policies that have been a mainstay in Annapolis for decades have driven Maryland into a state of economic ruin. (And, just for the record, both Democrats and Republicans are to blame.) Throughout the campaign, I promoted a "Texas model" to spur economic growth here in Maryland.
NEWS
June 7, 2008
A woman sought in the fatal shooting May 18 of another woman in a South Baltimore rowhouse has been arrested at a relative's house in San Antonio, according to the Lone Star Fugitive Task Force. Herlinda Rodulfo, 24, is charged in an arrest warrant with first-degree murder in the death of 18-year-old Valerie Barnes, who was fatally shot in a house in the 800 block of Pontiac Ave. in Brooklyn, according to the Baltimore police and the U.S. marshal's office. Police have not released a motive in the shooting.
SPORTS
January 13, 2006
We've been told for years that everything, from the sky to cattle to the size of the boast, is bigger in Texas. To that list, we can apparently add the amount that its school districts pay their football coaches. Actually, "big" hardly does justice to the salaries football coaches receive deep in the heart of Texas, with some earning more than $100,000 annually and in one case nearly $91,500 per victory. A Dallas Morning News survey of 37 school districts in Texas showed that the average salary paid to 95 coaches in the area for the current school year is $82,179.
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
In a season filled with low points, the Ravens reached another one yesterday, receiving a franchise-worst one invitation to the Pro Bowl. Offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden will make his ninth straight appearance in the NFL all-star game, becoming the only representative for the last-place Ravens (5-9). For Ogden, it was an honor welcomed with mixed emotions of a disappointing season. "It's kind of like having a good dessert but also having a crappy meal," Ogden said. "You know you'll feel a little better, but the steak was bad. Hopefully next year, we'll get a little bit of both."
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2005
It's a story accepted as gospel in Washington Redskins history. In the early 1930s, when the franchise still called Boston home, owner George Preston Marshall had to drop the moniker "Braves" after leaving the stadium he shared with the town's moribund Braves baseball franchise. So, seeking to honor his part-Sioux coach, William "Lone Star" Dietz, he re-christened his team the Redskins. Three years later, Marshall moved the club to Washington, and the rest is history. Or so the story went until last year, when California multicultural studies professor Linda Waggoner began sniffing around Dietz's biography.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2005
LAS VEGAS - When 2003 World Series of Poker champion Chris Moneymaker won $2.5 million in the world's most prestigious gambling event two years ago, Marylander Kyle Morse hadn't even played Texas Hold 'em, the game used to determine the famous card title. Now, Morse hopes to replicate the long-shot victory by Moneymaker, then a 27-year-old accountant who won his seat in the $10,000 buy-in event with a $39 investment in an online qualifying tournament. Morse, a 24-year-old restaurant manager from Abingdon in Harford County, has a seat in the poker World Series main event currently being held at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas after winning a $40 buy-in tournament on PokerRoom.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Last week, it looked as if Maryland Jockey Club operators would be squeezed out of their roles as management consultants to a new track in Texas.But don't count them out yet, Pimlico/Laurel executive Joe De Francis said yesterday.De Francis will leave for Dallas tomorrow to meet with Lone Star Jockey Club officials, who announced a surprising merger about 10 days ago with one of their former rivals, veteran racing executive R. D. Hubbard of Midpointe Racing.The Texas Racing Commission paved the way for approval of the merger yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 24, 1994
DALLAS -- NationsBank Corp., fighting a suit claiming the bank company used ill-gotten information to buy the operations of First RepublicBank Corp., must face a jury trial, a Texas appeals court ruled.The suit, filed in a Dallas state court in June 1992, alleges that NationsBank's predecessor, NCNB Corp., and Chairman and Chief Executive Hugh McColl Jr. unlawfully obtained the acquisition plan to be used by Lone Star Partners in its attempt to buy the insolvent bank subsidiaries of Dallas-based First RepublicBank.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 22, 2004
NINE DAYS before his 37th birthday, Anthony McCarthy decided it was time to celebrate. So the celebrants gathered at the Baltimore Urban League's Orchard Street building Friday night to pay homage to the man who, since he arrived in Baltimore, has been a publisher of one city newspaper, an associate publisher at another, editor of a third and the host of two radio shows. He has also worked for a City Council president. The last time I talked to McCarthy - for column purposes, at least - was in his capacity as the publisher of The Gay Life newspaper.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas - John Martin Silvertand plans to fly to Texas to root on Afleet Alex in the $1.5 million Breeders' Cup Juvenile on Saturday at Lone Star Park. Silvertand, who lives in West Palm Beach, Fla., bred Afleet Alex, one of the nation's most promising 2-year-olds. Silvertand plans to follow Afleet Alex through the spring preps leading to the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes. What's more, Silvertand has a weanling filly on the farm who's a half sister to Afleet Alex, and he can't wait to watch her mature and run. "I try to set goals for myself," Silvertand said.
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