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Lone Ranger

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NEWS
May 18, 1992
The sinking sun silhouettes a lone figure in a Smokey Bear hat riding horseback across the College Creek bridge. The rider dismounts and strides up to the Arundel Center. A star of gold on his chest catches the sun. Folks in town scatter. "Tell the county government Bob Pepersack's here," the rider says. "This town ain't big enough for us both."This seems to be the view of Mr. Pepersack, the Anne Arundel sheriff, toward county officials. When the county council subpoenaed him to answer questions about overspending his budget for a second year, the sheriff viewed it as an intrusion.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Cleaned up but fresh off the highway from his cross-country hitchhiking trip, John Waters was hanging with a much more refined crowd this week -- the starlets and fashionistas at the 2012 Council of Fashion Designers of America Fashion Awards. Waters accepted a big prize at Monday's event in New York City on behalf of his friend Johnny Depp. Depp was awarded the Fashion Icon prize. While accepting it, Waters called the actor "the star who made dirty hair fashionable. " (Depp couldn't attend the event because he was filming "The Lone Ranger.
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NEWS
By Joan E. Hellman | March 1, 1993
POINT OF IMPACT. By Stephen Hunter. Bantam Books. 451 pages. $22.IF Stephen Hunter's fifth novel, "Point of Impact," were found in a time capsule by a future anthropologist, what would the book reveal about popular culture of the 1990s?The first observation might be that the '90s were violent times. This book is first and foremost about Guns with a capital G, and that rhymes with D, and that stands for Dead.Get out your guns & ammo dictionary; you'll need it to decipher the bullet/gun lingo that weaves through every page.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | May 15, 2012
This is a tale about Baltimore beer barons, the owner of the Washington Senators, a silver bullet, and how the Orioles got to Baltimore. Now, with the O's generating a buzz as they fight for first place in the American League East and prepare to meet the Washington Nationals for a weekend series in D.C., it seems like a good time to spin it. I heard it some years ago when Dawson Farber Jr., a former executive at National Brewing Company who died...
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
For 24 years, Columbia resident Paul S. Newman wrote the exploits of America's favorite masked protector of the West. Today, the prolific comic book writer will help sell silk-screen prints of the Lone Ranger at an Ellicott City animation art exhibit.Mr. Newman, known in the industry as the King of Comic Book Writers for the more than 4,000 published scripts he's churned out during 48 years, will be signing two prints of the Lone Ranger from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Margaret Smith Gallery, 8090 Main St.It's the first time the Lone Ranger image has been licensed for use in works of fine art, he said.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 30, 2000
Here in the newspaper business (Motto: "Eventually, We WILL Find Your Driveway") we have a strict rule: We don't print ANYTHING unless we know it's true. Except for the horoscope, of course. No offense, but if you take the horoscope seriously, your frontal lobes are the size of Raisinets. Also some of the comics are not 100 percent accurate. For example, in real life, Garfield walks on four legs. He's a CAT, for gosh sakes! Also, to be honest, many of us who work at newspapers don't hold the opinions that our newspapers express in the editorials.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun reporter | June 30, 2008
For the past eight months, Luke Brackett has been part administrator, part lone ranger. Hired by Baltimore City in November to spearhead the creation of a new police force to protect the three city-owned reservoirs in Baltimore and Carroll counties, Brackett spends part of his days patrolling the watersheds and part interviewing applicants interested in joining his force. "I'm tasked with bringing the department to life," Brackett said. "We're still getting our feet wet, no pun intended."
NEWS
By AMY L. MILLER and AMY L. MILLER,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1995
Life should always be fun, insists Hampstead Councilwoman Jacqueline Hyatt.So, when small-town politics started to seem like a chore, Mrs. Hyatt -- the only council member not on a slate of slow-growth advocates who were swept into office in May -- decided to give up the post she has held since 1991."
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 11, 2000
Today's issue in the news is: Social Security. Is Social Security safe? Experts tell us that unless we implement meaningful reform soon, the entire system will go bankrupt by the year 2050, plunging the nation into chaos and despair. I personally plan to be dead. So we don't need to worry about it. Instead, let's talk about the ongoing debate over what, exactly, the Lone Ranger shouted to his horse, Silver, when he rode off into the sunset. As you may recall if you have no life, in a recent column I stated that I had always believed the Lone Ranger shouted "Hi-ho, Silver!
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | August 11, 1991
You think you have problems getting the kids through the cereal aisle without whining? Meet Jerry Cook, age 51..Mr. Cook recently paid $1,000 for a Lone Ranger Frontier Town Map, once a Cheerios premium."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun reporter | June 30, 2008
For the past eight months, Luke Brackett has been part administrator, part lone ranger. Hired by Baltimore City in November to spearhead the creation of a new police force to protect the three city-owned reservoirs in Baltimore and Carroll counties, Brackett spends part of his days patrolling the watersheds and part interviewing applicants interested in joining his force. "I'm tasked with bringing the department to life," Brackett said. "We're still getting our feet wet, no pun intended."
NEWS
By Harvey Rishikof | August 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is ending his judicial career very much like the way he began. When Mr. Rehnquist first joined the court, he marked his early years with a series of solo dissents that earned him the nickname of the "Lone Ranger." His clerks even presented him with a Lone Ranger doll that he placed on his mantle in his chambers. From the beginning, he exhibited a strong independent streak and a commitment to follow his own judicial philosophy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2001
Charles J. Harvey Jr., a Baltimore evangelist who devoted his life to bringing hope, comfort or food to those in need, died Sunday from complications of a stroke at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 56. A retired steel worker, he worked for Eastern Stainless Steel Corp. for 32 years until it closed. He was a tractor-trailer driver at his death. He devoted his spare time to working with the homeless, preaching at nursing homes, visiting the sick, helping distribute food and assisting fledgling churches.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
DALLAS - Superstar shortstop Alex Rodriguez exceeded even the wildest expectations that had grown up around his long-anticipated foray into the free-agent market, agreeing yesterday to a 10-year contract with the Texas Rangers that makes him the richest athlete in the history of professional team sports. The $252 million deal negotiated by agent Scott Boras doubles the previous record sports contract - NBA star Kevin Garnett's $126 million with the Minnesota Timberwolves. It more than doubles the total guarantee received by pitcher Mike Hampton ($123.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 11, 2000
Today's issue in the news is: Social Security. Is Social Security safe? Experts tell us that unless we implement meaningful reform soon, the entire system will go bankrupt by the year 2050, plunging the nation into chaos and despair. I personally plan to be dead. So we don't need to worry about it. Instead, let's talk about the ongoing debate over what, exactly, the Lone Ranger shouted to his horse, Silver, when he rode off into the sunset. As you may recall if you have no life, in a recent column I stated that I had always believed the Lone Ranger shouted "Hi-ho, Silver!
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 30, 2000
Here in the newspaper business (Motto: "Eventually, We WILL Find Your Driveway") we have a strict rule: We don't print ANYTHING unless we know it's true. Except for the horoscope, of course. No offense, but if you take the horoscope seriously, your frontal lobes are the size of Raisinets. Also some of the comics are not 100 percent accurate. For example, in real life, Garfield walks on four legs. He's a CAT, for gosh sakes! Also, to be honest, many of us who work at newspapers don't hold the opinions that our newspapers express in the editorials.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 30, 1999
WILL THE last person leaving the 20th century please put a key under the mat? We may want to check back later to see if we can figure out what happened back there. In the meantime, as Snow White famously said to her friends: Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. Goodbye, especially, to Clayton Moore, television's Lone Ranger, as he heads off to the strains of the "William Tell Overture" and a hearty "Hi-yo, Silver." And to Joseph Heller, who showed us that heroes could be everything the Lone Ranger wasn't, and still be heroes.
NEWS
February 21, 2000
Jeanne Hurley Simon, 77, a literacy advocate and the wife of former U.S. senator and presidential candidate Paul Simon, died yesterday, friends said. Mrs. Simon, who had surgery on a brain tumor in September, died at home in Carbondale, Ill., site of Southern Illinois University, where she and her husband taught. She helped him set up the Public Policy Institute at the university, where she was an adjunct professor of library affairs, after he retired from the Senate in 1997. She served as chairwoman of the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science since 1993.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 30, 1999
WILL THE last person leaving the 20th century please put a key under the mat? We may want to check back later to see if we can figure out what happened back there. In the meantime, as Snow White famously said to her friends: Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. Goodbye, especially, to Clayton Moore, television's Lone Ranger, as he heads off to the strains of the "William Tell Overture" and a hearty "Hi-yo, Silver." And to Joseph Heller, who showed us that heroes could be everything the Lone Ranger wasn't, and still be heroes.
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