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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
Soccer is getting so popular! Even the Bolivian squirrel monkeys can't resist. Here they are, gathered around a toy football at the London Zoo on August 18. The zoo has 22 squirrel monkeys, with one adult male, Bounty, having fathered 11 of them. Is 22 enough for a soccer team? (And by the way, is "Bounty" appropriately named or what?)
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
Soccer is getting so popular! Even the Bolivian squirrel monkeys can't resist. Here they are, gathered around a toy football at the London Zoo on August 18. The zoo has 22 squirrel monkeys, with one adult male, Bounty, having fathered 11 of them. Is 22 enough for a soccer team? (And by the way, is "Bounty" appropriately named or what?)
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NEWS
July 16, 1991
With animal species dying out from the onslaught of human habitat, some of the most valued survive only in zoos -- in fortunate cases, to be reintroduced into the wild. But that can continue to happen only if the world's zoos, themselves an endangered species, survive.One of the oldest (1828), largest (8,000 animals) and most famous, the London Zoo in Regent's Park, has decided to close in September 1992 if the British government or private philanthropy do not fork over $21 million to save it.Its death, and the scattering or slaughter of its residents, would be a blow not only to the millions of animal-lovers in the south of England, but to the cause of wildlife itself.
FEATURES
By SUN-SENTINEL | August 24, 1997
1/8 TC I will be going to New York with my three granddaughters -- aged 22, 20 and 19. I would love to show them a great time. I would appreciate any help you could give me.The New York Convention and Visitors Bureau has one of the best help lines operated by an American city. Call 800-NYC-VISIT for information on events, attractions, accommodations, shopping, theater, dining, bargains and more. The line provides taped help around the clock; information counselors are available weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and weekends and holidays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The same information is available at the city's Web site (nycvisit.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
Not everyone approves of a zoo. Animals are jailed; they live unnatural lives; they cannot extend their instincts and abilities. Some people think that modern society should give up zoos and just watch animal videos.Those people are wrong. Zoos are more indispensable than ever. They bring people of a society together in one place as nothing else does save possibly baseball. They succeed on one level as freak shows yet on another as extraordinarily sophisticated education providers. They cater wonderfully to the simplest minds in society and the most complex.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | July 7, 1991
LONDON -- Somewhere, wherever fictional characters rest, the ghost of Christopher Robin is turning in his grave. How could they do this to Winnie the Pooh's old home?"
FEATURES
By SUN-SENTINEL | August 24, 1997
1/8 TC I will be going to New York with my three granddaughters -- aged 22, 20 and 19. I would love to show them a great time. I would appreciate any help you could give me.The New York Convention and Visitors Bureau has one of the best help lines operated by an American city. Call 800-NYC-VISIT for information on events, attractions, accommodations, shopping, theater, dining, bargains and more. The line provides taped help around the clock; information counselors are available weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and weekends and holidays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The same information is available at the city's Web site (nycvisit.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 3, 1992
LONDON -- Maybe it's a measure of how deep the recession is biting in Britain that even the king of the beasts faces redundancy.So does the lordly elephant, the humpy camel, the patriarchal baboon, the monogamous wolf and all the others among the 600 or so animals at the Windsor Safari Park.Their futures are cloudier than those of Britain's miners. There's not much work around for miners these days, even less for tigers and dolphins, not to mention emus, lemurs and eland antelopes.They can't get on at the London Zoo. That place is forever hovering on the edge of bankruptcy.
NEWS
September 9, 2003
C.H. Sisson, 89, a British poet, novelist and critic who explored the human condition and the melancholy of growing older, died Friday. Born in Bristol, Mr. Sisson graduated from Bristol University before joining the Ministry of Labor in 1936. During World War II, he served with the British army on India's northwest frontier. Upon his return, he worked in the civil service until retiring in 1972. His first anthology, The London Zoo, was published in 1961. But Mr. Sisson did not become well known for his poetry until The Trojan Ditch was published in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | October 18, 2001
This past Sunday, Winnie the Pooh -- the fictional yellow bear who's inspired such philosophical texts as The Tao of Pooh, Pooh and the Philosophers and Postmodern Pooh -- turned 75. The Havre de Grace Branch Library is celebrating with a belated birthday bash Monday, featuring games, stories and treats. Now most of us know a thing or two about Pooh: He eats "hunny" by the fistful; he hangs out with a miniature pig, a bouncing tiger and a donkey; and he possesses a rather irrational fear of imaginary "Woozles," "Heffalumps" and "Jagulars."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 3, 1992
LONDON -- Maybe it's a measure of how deep the recession is biting in Britain that even the king of the beasts faces redundancy.So does the lordly elephant, the humpy camel, the patriarchal baboon, the monogamous wolf and all the others among the 600 or so animals at the Windsor Safari Park.Their futures are cloudier than those of Britain's miners. There's not much work around for miners these days, even less for tigers and dolphins, not to mention emus, lemurs and eland antelopes.They can't get on at the London Zoo. That place is forever hovering on the edge of bankruptcy.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
Not everyone approves of a zoo. Animals are jailed; they live unnatural lives; they cannot extend their instincts and abilities. Some people think that modern society should give up zoos and just watch animal videos.Those people are wrong. Zoos are more indispensable than ever. They bring people of a society together in one place as nothing else does save possibly baseball. They succeed on one level as freak shows yet on another as extraordinarily sophisticated education providers. They cater wonderfully to the simplest minds in society and the most complex.
NEWS
July 16, 1991
With animal species dying out from the onslaught of human habitat, some of the most valued survive only in zoos -- in fortunate cases, to be reintroduced into the wild. But that can continue to happen only if the world's zoos, themselves an endangered species, survive.One of the oldest (1828), largest (8,000 animals) and most famous, the London Zoo in Regent's Park, has decided to close in September 1992 if the British government or private philanthropy do not fork over $21 million to save it.Its death, and the scattering or slaughter of its residents, would be a blow not only to the millions of animal-lovers in the south of England, but to the cause of wildlife itself.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | July 7, 1991
LONDON -- Somewhere, wherever fictional characters rest, the ghost of Christopher Robin is turning in his grave. How could they do this to Winnie the Pooh's old home?"
NEWS
April 22, 1996
Christopher Robin Milne, 'Winnie the Pooh' friend, 75Christopher Robin Milne, 75, immortalized as the young friend of Winnie the Pooh in the children's stories by his father, A. A. Milne, has died, the Times of London reported today.The newspaper said Christopher Robin Milne died Saturday but did not say where or give the cause.He was born in London in 1920 and was known as an adult to resent the melding of his childhood and the fictional one in his father's tales.In 1924, Alan Alexander Milne, already well-known for his light hand at literature, published a book of verse inspired by his 4-year-old son, "When We Were Very Young."
NEWS
July 5, 1992
A few years ago there were 8 million Somalis; now there are 7 million. Somalia as a nation has disappeared. The diplomatic corps gone. Hospitals looted. The overthrow of dictator Mohammed Siad Barre last year, which should have rescued the country from misrule, has led to anarchy and breakdown. Somalian clan armies destroy each other and anything in sight. Their weapons are the ones the U.S. supplied to Siad Barre, or that earlier the Soviet Union did, or that later Libya did.Relief agencies toss out such figures as 1.5 million Somalis in danger of starvation, or 4.5 million who will face hunger if food is not forthcoming.
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