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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Even the rich shared their homes with strangers in order to make ends meet in early Maryland. And their children, like the children of the working class and the slaves, were given household responsibilities at the youngest ages. Visitors to Historic London Town and Gardens, a 23-acre park featuring history and archaeology in southern Anne Arundel County, can now get an intimate look at the lives of three families as they lived when this town was Maryland's most important port city.
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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Sunday, Aug. 10 Moon kayaking Kayak a stretch of the Patuxent from Wooton's Landing, 4550 Sands Road, Harwood, to Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., ending under a full moon. Marsh ecology and history will be discussed along the way. For experienced paddlers 13 years and older. Cost is $20. Information and registration: aacounty.org/recparks or 410-222-7313. Summer concert Pilgrim and Trout performs at 5 p.m. at Historic London Town and Gardens, 839 Londontown Road in Edgewater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 7, 1999
Mission: To serve as steward of Historic London Town and Gardens and to research, explore and teach tidewater history through the story of the lost towns of Anne Arundel County. The foundation is committed to preserving its historic, archaeological and horticultural resources and to contributing to the fields of history, archaeology, preservation, architectural history and horticulture. Historic London Town and Gardens, a 23-acre park on the South River, is owned by Anne Arundel County and managed and interpreted by the nonprofit London Town Foundation.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Rod Cofield has the building. Now he needs the tools. Cofield's team at Historic London Town and Gardens has built a reproduction of a carpentry shop at the Colonial site in Edgewater. Now, to show how carpenters worked at the site in the 1700s, he has to find tools from that era. "We have a few tools. … It's not as if we can go to Lowe's or Home Depot to find what we need," Cofield said. Such are the challenges of running a historic site that's part museum, part gardens, part archaeological site and part wedding venue.
NEWS
December 20, 1999
The archaeology program at Historic London Town and Gardens has been designated an official project of Save America's Treasures, a public-private partnership of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the White House Millennium Council.In remarks prepared for the designation ceremony held Thursday, National Trust President Richard Moe wrote of the importance in entering the next millennium of preserving not only historic buildings, but "the places where our history unfolds.""The Lost Towns of Anne Arundel Archaeology Project is unearthing evidence that London Town was a thriving port of the Chesapeake Bay," Moe wrote, adding, "This project is a terrific example of how we can inspire future generations by rediscovering our past."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | November 6, 1992
The management of the London Town Publik House and Gardens, overseen by the county since 1828, is scheduled to be turned over to a private foundation next summer.The plan to privatize the historic Edgewater site was first introduced by County Executive Robert R. Neall in his budget proposal last May. Since then, the London Town Publik House and Gardens Commission, the county organization that oversees the museum, has been pursuing plans to create a private foundation.The county will retain ownership and contribute to the costs of operation, as it does with other non-profit arts and cultural organizations, said county spokeswoman Louise Hayman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 11, 2002
You can only learn so much about the past from books. Eyewitness accounts are great, but there's nothing like actually finding clues to the past and remnants of history yourself. Saturday, you can dig alongside archaeologists and look for artifacts and evidence of the lost Maryland town of London. The Lost Towns Project and London Town Foundation sponsor "Archaeology Dig Days" once a month on Saturdays through September. No experience is necessary. Event is geared to ages 8 through adult.
NEWS
May 23, 1995
Ellen K. Rothman, executive director of the London Town Foundation, is planning to leave the post by July 14, and a nationwide search for a replacement should be complete by next week, foundation officials said.Ms. Rothman said she plans to return to New England, where she lived for 25 years before taking over as the chief manager of the 235-acre historic site in Edgewater in 1993."It's been hard work and very satisfying, and I am sad to leave," said Ms. Rothman, 44, a Baltimore native. "But while my roots are in Maryland, the rest of the tree is in New England."
NEWS
August 30, 1998
Gregory A. Stiverson has been appointed executive director of the London Town Foundation board of directors. He comes to the foundation after 20 years as assistant state archivist and three years as manager of public affairs and training for the state comptroller's office.Stiverson has written or edited nearly 40 books and articles on Maryland history, including a biography of Maryland's signer of the Declaration of Independence, William Paca, and a Maryland history textbook for high school students.
NEWS
November 13, 1992
The London Town Publik House and Gardens is one of those magical places where one can forget the present and journey back to Colonial times, when Edgewater was a busy tobacco port. During those days, London Town was a crossing on an overland route from Williamsburg, Va., to Philadelphia. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were among the notables who used its ferry.Suburban Annapolis keeps creeping up on London Town. But the Publik House, a restored red-brick Georgian mansion dating to the mid-1760s, still stands guard over the South River, surrounded by a sizable garden that is as enjoyable for strolling in these late, blustery days of autumn as it is during the azalea days of spring.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
Tawes Garden & Shop Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of gardening tasks, including planting, watering, weeding and mulching. Also needed are tour guides, particularly in April and May, to assist the teacher-naturalist with large groups. Year-round programs need chaperones for field trips as well as assistants for nature programs. Shopkeepers are needed for two-hour shifts on a weekly or bimonthly basis in the gift shop at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
Elementary school students in some Anne Arundel County public schools are learning how good they've got it — in other words, how many wake up in comfy beds to a ready-made breakfast, instead of beginning their day with daunting physical chores or, worse, wearing shackles. Life for children in the 18th century was quite different than it is today, and fourth- and fifth-graders in Anne Arundel schools are using some 21st-century technology to learn the hard truth about families from that period.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
It's a sun-splashed morning in rolling southern Anne Arundel County, and a cluster of old oaks and maples make a fine canopy for the 25 gentlemen gathered at the cottage they see as a shrine. Some wear seersucker blazers and boating shoes. Many sport neckties with their club's logo - a British flag and an American flag, their staffs crossed. Their laughter echoes off the clubhouse, a bungalow built 34 years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence. "We have an ancient tradition - it never rains on meeting day at the Old South River Club," says Chris Wilson, a longtime member of the tiny Harwood society that calls itself "the oldest continuously operating social club in the English-speaking world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Even the rich shared their homes with strangers in order to make ends meet in early Maryland. And their children, like the children of the working class and the slaves, were given household responsibilities at the youngest ages. Visitors to Historic London Town and Gardens, a 23-acre park featuring history and archaeology in southern Anne Arundel County, can now get an intimate look at the lives of three families as they lived when this town was Maryland's most important port city.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
In her hands, a scrap becomes a story. Jessie Grow fishes through a box full of what looks to be junk, pulling out a 2-inch fragment of clay pipe. It brings to mind a time long ago - hard to imagine now - when men, women and children routinely smoked tobacco, thinking it was good for their health. A rust-eaten nail evokes the late 1600s, when settlers near the South River built small homes out of wood, never realizing they wouldn't last 30 years in termite-infested Maryland. And a chunk of pottery evokes Colonial days, when traders from the Far East shipped their fine porcelain to the mid-Atlantic region in exchange for tobacco - the crop that gave birth to London Town, a bustling community that served as a major seaport for 90 years, then silently passed away.
NEWS
May 10, 2009
Environmental program for kids The Annapolis Recreation and Parks Department is offering an environmental educational program at Back Creek Nature Park at 1314 Edgewood Road. Stormwater Education Experience will be held at 3 p.m. May 17 and 3:45 p.m. May 18. The program is geared toward ages 3 to 10 and cost $5 per class. Registration is required by phone at 410-263-7958 or online at annapolis.gov/recreation. New galley The Naval Academy has received $51 million in federal economic recovery money to build a galley.
FEATURES
December 15, 1991
The London Town Publik House is decorated with traditional greens for a Colonial holiday, and Christmas candlelight tours will be held there today from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.Costumed actors representing the builder and original innkeeper, William Brown, his wife and others, will re-create the era when the Publik House was frequented by 18th century travelers waiting to board the South River ferry and local townspeople used it for social gatherings. Sailors, servants, a planter and a tavern wench will be among the cast of characters.
NEWS
August 21, 2008
$186,000 in grants offered to four groups in Four Rivers The Maryland Heritage Areas Authority has approved more than $186,000 for four grant project proposals within Four Rivers: The Heritage Area of Annapolis, London Town & South County. The grant money totalling $186,916 will support regional heritage-related projects totaling more than $397,000. All grants are matched at the local level. In addition to receiving $100,000 for operating and program assistance, Four Rivers helped the following local heritage-related organizations in obtaining MHAA funding: * The Annapolis Maritime Museum will receive $50,000 to support an interactive exhibit entitled Oysters on the Half Shell, the first component of its new Bay Experience Center in the reconstructed McNasby Oyster Company building in Eastport.
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