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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 3, 1995
Chuck Berry knew all along.Remember in "Roll Over, Beethoven," when he announced it was time for ol' Ludwig van to "tell Tchaikovsky the news"? Most of us thought the song was saying that rock and roll records were going to push classical music off the airwaves, but Berry's actual meaning went deeper.What he saw was a day when even symphony orchestras would be "rockin' in two-by-two."And he was right. The symphony scene is really starting to rock.Granted, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky haven't quite been stricken from the symphony schedules yet. But that may be only a matter of time, as the number of symphonic rock albums grows from a trickle to a torrent.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 3, 1995
Chuck Berry knew all along.Remember in "Roll Over, Beethoven," when he announced it was time for ol' Ludwig van to "tell Tchaikovsky the news"? Most of us thought the song was saying that rock and roll records were going to push classical music off the airwaves, but Berry's actual meaning went deeper.What he saw was a day when even symphony orchestras would be "rockin' in two-by-two."And he was right. The symphony scene is really starting to rock.Granted, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky haven't quite been stricken from the symphony schedules yet. But that may be only a matter of time, as the number of symphonic rock albums grows from a trickle to a torrent.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 12, 1995
Shostakovich, Symphony No. 8 in C minor (opus 65), performed by the London Symphony Orchestra, Andre Previn conducting (Deutsche Grammophon 437 819-2)This listener rates the Shostakovich Symphony No. 8 -- along with the Sibelius Symphony No. 4 and the Mahler Symphony No. 6 -- as one of the three most depressing of the great symphonic works written in the 20th century.Shostakovich had a knack for getting himself in trouble with the Soviet authorities, and this piece did the trick. Only a year or so after the hugely popular Symphony No. 7 ("Leningrad")
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January 24, 1995
Ezra Rachlin, 79, a pianist and conductor who was the longtime music director of the Austin Symphony Orchestra in Texas, died in London Saturday after vascular surgery. He lived in London, where he performed with the London Symphony Orchestra, the London Philharmonia and the Halle Orchestra, for more than 20 years. He was the conductor in Austin for 20 years until 1969, and chief conductor of the Queensland Symphony Orchestra in Brisbane, Australia, from 1970 to 1972.Takezo Shimoda, 87, a former ambassador to the United States and Japan's one-time baseball commissioner, died Sunday of heart failure at a Tokyo hospital.
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By New York Daily News | May 1, 1999
If you're standing in line counting down to the day you can buy tickets to "Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace," you might want to get somebody to hold your place Monday afternoon. Otherwise you'll miss another premiere -- a music video chock-full of footage from the year's most anticipated film.The video, "Duel of the Fates," serves up scenes with "Menace" stars Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman and the irreverent computer robot R2-D2. There is also behind-the-scenes footage, including clips of composer John Williams meshing the sounds of the London Symphony Orchestra with the movie soundtrack.
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By John Guinn and John Guinn,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 13, 1994
British maestro John Eliot Gardiner found a dictionary that defines the word "conductor" as "a current passed from one sphere to another."While that definition comes from physics, Mr. Gardiner maintains it's an apt way to characterize the person who stands in front of an orchestra and, through various bodily gyrations, gets that orchestra to produce musical sounds.Mr. Gardiner makes his observation in "The Art of Conducting: Great Conductors of the Past," a splendid video just released on the Teldec label.
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April 19, 1993
Alexander Peskanov, an internationally known pianist and founder of the Piano Olympics, will conduct an all-day master class for piano Saturday in Western Maryland College's Levine Recital Hall.The class, open to the public, will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will be limited to the first 80 participants. The cost is $15 for adults and $5 for students. It was originally scheduled for last month, but was postponed due to the blizzard.Mr. Peskanov has performed with orchestras in several U.S. cities and appeared on the PBS special, "Odessa on the Savannah -- The Music of Alexander Peskanov."
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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
It will be an operatic battle when three competitors sing with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center tomorrow.They are finalists in the Marian Anderson International Vocal Competition, which began a week ago at the University of Maryland, College Park. Among the 35 contestants were singers from Lebanon, Korea, Japan, Britain and the United States.The finalists are Barbara Quintiliani, a 22-year-old soprano from Dorchester, Mass.; Tigran Martirosian, a 29-year-old bass from Russia; and Eleni Matos, a 33-year-old mezzo-soprano from Clearwater, Fla. They were chosen from a field of 12 semi-finalists by an international jury.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 6, 2003
The people and the professionals have spoken - and awarded Peabody Institute faculty member Christopher Theofanidis the 2003 Masterprize for his orchestral work Rainbow Body. Theofanidis returned to the Baltimore campus yesterday fresh from his victory in this unique international composition competition in London, where he received the prize of 25,000 British pounds (about $42,000). His colleagues in Peabody's composition department, including Peabody director Robert Sirota and British-born composer Nicholas Maw, surprised him with a champagne toast.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1990
The cartooning in ''The Nutcracker Prince'' is almost crude, but the animated feature, based on the story by E.T.A. Hoffman, goes by in a hurry, and the very small children who attended an advance screening sat very still for it. That may be the ultimate test.The film, the first full-length animated feature to be done by Lacewood Productions in Canada, also provides us with a very clear vision of the plot. Those who have sat through the ballet without knowing what was going on will know what is going on in the film.
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By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1996
Barry Tuckwell had played thousands of concerts in front of millions of people, but never as an American citizen. Performing at his own naturalization ceremony gave him the jitters."
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