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By New York Times News Service | January 16, 2007
LONDON --The city was still edgy, two weeks after the London bombings of July 2005, when suddenly on a summer's day the horror seemed to return. On three subway cars and a bus, young men boarded with backpacks stuffed full of explosives, but there was an all-important difference: This time the explosives failed to detonate. Yesterday, in a courthouse here close to the high-security Belmarsh prison, six men appeared on trial, charged with conspiracy to murder and cause explosions on July 21, 2005.
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NEWS
By Alicia Lozano and Alicia Lozano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
LONDON -- Four men convicted of conspiracy to murder were sentenced yesterday to life in prison for their part in failed suicide bombings on London's transit system in 2005. Each must serve a minimum of 40 years before being eligible for parole. Woolwich Crown Court said two other defendants will be retried in the July 21, 2005, attempts. No date has been set. During sentencing, Judge Adrian Fulford linked the botched attacks to London transit bombings two weeks earlier that killed 52 people.
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NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2005
LONDON - As investigators explored possible international links to four British Muslims believed to be behind the July 7 suicide bombings of three subway trains and a double-decker bus, officials prepared to introduce tough legislation today that would make it a crime to incite, foster or glorify terrorism. Police continued to comb through seven of 10 residences raided in Leeds and Aylesbury during the past week, searching for clues to the methods and motivations behind the blasts that killed at least 55 people, including the four suspected bombers.
NEWS
By Alicia Lozano and Alicia Lozano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2007
LONDON -- Four of six men accused in a failed attempt to blow up parts of London's public transit system in 2005 were convicted yesterday of conspiracy to commit murder. The jury will continue deliberations on the fate of the other two defendants today. The panel unanimously rejected the defense contention that the bombs, which failed to explode, were meant to merely scare the public and prompt government officials to reconsider British involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. "The failure of those bombs to explode owed nothing to the intention of these defendants.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and John Daniszewski and Megan K. Stack and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 16, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - Egyptian police were interrogating a 33-year-old biochemist last night who was seized in connection with last week's London bombings, as relatives denied that he had anything to do with the deadly suicide blasts. Cairo police seized Magdy el-Nashar at his parents' home in Bassateen, a poor suburb of the capital, the Egyptian Interior Ministry said in a statement. The doctoral graduate, who had once studied chemical engineering in North Carolina, denied any connection with the London attacks and said that he was in Cairo on vacation, the ministry reported.
NEWS
By Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah and Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2005
CHICAGO - In the most far-reaching ruling of its kind in America, the nation's largest association of Islamic legal scholars plans to issue a fatwa today against terrorism and extremism. The ruling by the Fiqh Council of North America has been endorsed by several major American Islamic organizations and follows one issued by British Muslims in the wake of the London bombings. Because Islam is a decentralized faith, the fatwa would have little binding effect on most Muslims. But it is a significant step by a well-known organization that, through its moral authority, could have reverberations around the world.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 2, 2005
LONDON - After weeks of speculation about al-Qaida ties to the London bombings on July 7, a video emerged yesterday of Osama bin Laden's top lieutenant and of a British Muslim who blew himself up in the attacks. In the video, the bomber proclaimed himself a soldier of Islam while the al-Qaida lieutenant warned of attacks to come. The tape was the first solid indication of al-Qaida ties to the London attacks, which killed 52 commuters and the four bombers. It was released to Al-Jazeera and was later aired by the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By Alicia Lozano and Alicia Lozano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2007
LONDON -- Four of six men accused in a failed attempt to blow up parts of London's public transit system in 2005 were convicted yesterday of conspiracy to commit murder. The jury will continue deliberations on the fate of the other two defendants today. The panel unanimously rejected the defense contention that the bombs, which failed to explode, were meant to merely scare the public and prompt government officials to reconsider British involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. "The failure of those bombs to explode owed nothing to the intention of these defendants.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | February 19, 1991
LONDON -- The Irish Republican Army was blamed for bringing chaos to London's morning rush hour yesterday by exploding bombs at two rail stations, forcing police to cut all main-line train service into the capital.It was the IRA's second major attack against a civilian target this month and came 10 days after it launched three mortar rounds at the prime minister's office on Downing Street. That attack caused structural damage but injured no one.Bomb scares also closed London's Heathrow Airport.
NEWS
April 26, 1996
THE TWO BOMBS that failed to blow up the busy Hammersmith Bridge in London show the Irish Republican Army is planning to escalate its violence in an attempt to derail the Northern Ireland peace process, which is entering a critical stage in a few weeks.Under a timetable agreed by British Prime Minister John Major and Irish Prime Minister John Bruton, Ulster voters will select on May 30 the 110 members of a forum from which negotiators will be drawn for a constitutional convention scheduled to begin June 10. The Irish Republican Army, which ended its 17-month cease-fire in February, clearly fears that these negotiations would undermine the significance of its political wing, Sinn Fein.
NEWS
By Janet Stobart and Kim Murphy and Janet Stobart and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 23, 2007
London -- Three men were arrested yesterday in connection with the July 2005 explosions on the London transit system that marked suicide terrorism's deadly debut in Western Europe. British police did not say what role the men are believed to have played in the bombings, which killed 52 people. Officials described the arrests as part of a "painstaking investigation" aimed at learning the true scope of the attacks. A series of searches was being carried out in east London and in the northern English city of Leeds.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 2007
LONDON --The city was still edgy, two weeks after the London bombings of July 2005, when suddenly on a summer's day the horror seemed to return. On three subway cars and a bus, young men boarded with backpacks stuffed full of explosives, but there was an all-important difference: This time the explosives failed to detonate. Yesterday, in a courthouse here close to the high-security Belmarsh prison, six men appeared on trial, charged with conspiracy to murder and cause explosions on July 21, 2005.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 2, 2005
LONDON - After weeks of speculation about al-Qaida ties to the London bombings on July 7, a video emerged yesterday of Osama bin Laden's top lieutenant and of a British Muslim who blew himself up in the attacks. In the video, the bomber proclaimed himself a soldier of Islam while the al-Qaida lieutenant warned of attacks to come. The tape was the first solid indication of al-Qaida ties to the London attacks, which killed 52 commuters and the four bombers. It was released to Al-Jazeera and was later aired by the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah and Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2005
CHICAGO - In the most far-reaching ruling of its kind in America, the nation's largest association of Islamic legal scholars plans to issue a fatwa today against terrorism and extremism. The ruling by the Fiqh Council of North America has been endorsed by several major American Islamic organizations and follows one issued by British Muslims in the wake of the London bombings. Because Islam is a decentralized faith, the fatwa would have little binding effect on most Muslims. But it is a significant step by a well-known organization that, through its moral authority, could have reverberations around the world.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2005
LONDON - As investigators explored possible international links to four British Muslims believed to be behind the July 7 suicide bombings of three subway trains and a double-decker bus, officials prepared to introduce tough legislation today that would make it a crime to incite, foster or glorify terrorism. Police continued to comb through seven of 10 residences raided in Leeds and Aylesbury during the past week, searching for clues to the methods and motivations behind the blasts that killed at least 55 people, including the four suspected bombers.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2005
LONDON - As the investigation into the London bombings fanned out to Pakistan, Egypt, Jamaica and the United States, Prime Minister Tony Blair vowed yesterday to confront the "evil ideology" of Islamic fanaticism that has inflicted despair on every community here, including Muslims. Police have formally identified all four suicide bombers, Scotland Yard reported. Pathologists put names to body parts found in each of the explosions by analyzing DNA samples collected at their homes and from fingerprints left on a prepaid parking stub one of the men left on his dashboard.
NEWS
By Janet Stobart and Kim Murphy and Janet Stobart and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 23, 2007
London -- Three men were arrested yesterday in connection with the July 2005 explosions on the London transit system that marked suicide terrorism's deadly debut in Western Europe. British police did not say what role the men are believed to have played in the bombings, which killed 52 people. Officials described the arrests as part of a "painstaking investigation" aimed at learning the true scope of the attacks. A series of searches was being carried out in east London and in the northern English city of Leeds.
NEWS
By Alicia Lozano and Alicia Lozano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
LONDON -- Four men convicted of conspiracy to murder were sentenced yesterday to life in prison for their part in failed suicide bombings on London's transit system in 2005. Each must serve a minimum of 40 years before being eligible for parole. Woolwich Crown Court said two other defendants will be retried in the July 21, 2005, attempts. No date has been set. During sentencing, Judge Adrian Fulford linked the botched attacks to London transit bombings two weeks earlier that killed 52 people.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and John Daniszewski and Megan K. Stack and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 16, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - Egyptian police were interrogating a 33-year-old biochemist last night who was seized in connection with last week's London bombings, as relatives denied that he had anything to do with the deadly suicide blasts. Cairo police seized Magdy el-Nashar at his parents' home in Bassateen, a poor suburb of the capital, the Egyptian Interior Ministry said in a statement. The doctoral graduate, who had once studied chemical engineering in North Carolina, denied any connection with the London attacks and said that he was in Cairo on vacation, the ministry reported.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
So, are we just going to have to get used to it? Are a certain number of bombs and deaths and scares just going to be part of our lives for the foreseeable future? That's a legitimate question in the wake of last week's bombings in London. After all, these explosions were set off despite all the heightened precautions that followed the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and the March 2003 attacks on the subway in Madrid - and despite years of attacks on al-Qaida, in Afghanistan and elsewhere, and decades of precautions put in place in London during bombing campaigns carried out by the Irish Republican Army.
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