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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | February 9, 2009
When you first glance at their nutrition labels, you might think this iced Valentine cookie from Target has fewer calories than the big swirly lollipop nearby. But look closer, and you'll find that the serving size listed for the cookie is only for one-third of the baked good! If you want to eat a whole treat (and who wouldn't?), the lollipop will save you 120 calories and 21 grams of fat. (The lollipop is higher in carbs, though.) Kate Shatzkin Target Iced Cookie Per cookie (3.49 ounces)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | March 24, 2011
UPDATE: Universal Music Group is killing all of the YouTube videos. Head over to Rap Radar to stream the track — just make sure it's the dirty version. It's on iTunes , too. Lil Wayne quietly dropped the second Carter IV single last night and how much you enjoy it will depend on your love of Rick Ross/Lex Luger-produced bangers (think "B.M.F. " and "MC Hammer"). Surprisingly, "If I Die Today (John)" didn't have the young Luger behind the boards — that was Polow Da Don. Even more interesting than Polow's obvious aping is the song's concept: it's Wayne and Ross' re-imagining of "I'm Not a Star," the opening, J.U.S.T.I.C.E.
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NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | November 24, 1991
Rubber hammer and bicycle pump in hand, the "doctor" began her morning rounds.Entering the room of 8-year-old Lonnie Lloyd, the odd-looking physician placed a stethoscope affixed to a small toilet plunger on Lonnie's head before checking his throat with an oversized tongue depressor -- a paint-stirrer from Hechinger.The clown in the lab coat, who really is a clown in a lab coat, introduced herself as "Dr. Lollipop -- a real sucker," advising the youngster that if he ever needs an operation, to just look her up in the Yellow Pages under "sturgeon."
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | February 9, 2009
When you first glance at their nutrition labels, you might think this iced Valentine cookie from Target has fewer calories than the big swirly lollipop nearby. But look closer, and you'll find that the serving size listed for the cookie is only for one-third of the baked good! If you want to eat a whole treat (and who wouldn't?), the lollipop will save you 120 calories and 21 grams of fat. (The lollipop is higher in carbs, though.) Kate Shatzkin Target Iced Cookie Per cookie (3.49 ounces)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | December 26, 1992
The last place any child wants to be is in the hospital. Especially on Christmas.But a tough holiday became a little brighter for 5-year-old Nathan Venditta and other sick children at the University of Maryland Medical Center, thanks to Dr. Lollipop and her motley medical "staff," which included an operatic duck and a candy-toting mouse.From her white coat, the red-wigged, clown-faced "doctor" pulled out a stethoscope with a plunger on the end."You want to listen to my heart?" she asked Nathan, who was walking the hospital corridor with his mother and an intravenous-fluid rack in tow. "Doesn't it sound like a dripping toilet?"
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1999
CLARIFICATIONLolly Pop, Lollipop -- not Dr. Lollipop. An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun reported that 77-year-old Morris Danoff, who works with sick children as a clown using the name Dr. Lolly Pop, is the subject of a lawsuit by Johns Hopkins Hospital. But another person in Baltimore works with sick children as a clown under a similar name. The other, Judy Goldblum-Carlton, also known as Dr. Lollipop, is not being sued.The clown chalks it up to hubris.But officials at Johns Hopkins Hospital are fed up with Dr. Lolly Pop's fliers and picketing.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | November 17, 2006
Jerry Maren sauntered before the audience assembled yesterday at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum and bellowed, "The Lollipop Kid from The Wizard of Oz is here!" The 86-year-old actor from Los Angeles, who played one of the Munchkins in the 1939 classic, was there to help display Judy Garland's ruby slippers and Ray Bolger's scarecrow costume at a temporary exhibit while the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History undergoes a 20-month renovation. He was accompanied by fellow Munchkin character Ruth Duccini, 88, of Phoenix, Ariz.
FEATURES
By Cathy Collison | January 4, 1999
Who does Andrew Filo credit with the idea for Sound Bites, the novelty lollipop that has a collectible music toy with it?The inventor Thomas Edison, that's who.No, Thomas Edison didn't come up with the idea of sticking a sucker in a little music machine and having the sound carry through your teeth from the lollipop. But Andrew had visited Edison's home in Fort Myers, Fla., and found an Edison idea that intrigued him.At the home, Andrew learned about an early device that Edison used to hear the sounds of his phonograph through his inner ear.Andrew stored this information away in his brain.
NEWS
By Carolyn Shapiro and Jody Snider and Carolyn Shapiro and Jody Snider,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 3, 2001
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Pamela Withrow didn't think she could ever find another Lollipop. But with the help of modern genetic research, a Texas biotechnology company and her veterinarian, she now thinks she has a chance to re-create her beloved 13-year-old Yorkshire terrier. The dog wears special outfits, poses for professional photographs and is the center of Withrow's life. Lollipop also has kidney problems. So Withrow decided to spend almost $1,000, to start, to preserve her dog's genes, in hopes of later cloning her. "I don't want to not be able to do this years from now," Withrow said.
NEWS
April 26, 2000
A bag of jelly beans and a distinctive chocolate lollipop led to the arrest of two men and a juvenile late Monday in Westminster. They were accused of stealing the candy and other items from a vehicle parked in the Middle Brook development at the south end of town. The items were reported stolen about 10: 50 p.m. A witness told police that three youths entered the car, then left in a light-colored Chevrolet Cavalier. Some of the items were found along the road, including a purse and cosmetics.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Patrick Corbett -- perched atop a booster on a barber's chair -- sat wide-eyed and solemn for a few placid minutes. Then as the barber clipped, moving nimbly and steadily in a race against a crying jag, the huffing started, almost like a car gunning. By the time small clumps of dirty-blond hair had collected on his shoulders, Patrick was yowling: "Ow, ow, ow, ow!" Lee Corbett swooped in to hold her son on her lap, which quieted him -- but only until the scissors started snipping just north of his nose.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | November 17, 2006
Jerry Maren sauntered before the audience assembled yesterday at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum and bellowed, "The Lollipop Kid from The Wizard of Oz is here!" The 86-year-old actor from Los Angeles, who played one of the Munchkins in the 1939 classic, was there to help display Judy Garland's ruby slippers and Ray Bolger's scarecrow costume at a temporary exhibit while the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History undergoes a 20-month renovation. He was accompanied by fellow Munchkin character Ruth Duccini, 88, of Phoenix, Ariz.
NEWS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2006
When it comes to serving, Liberty volleyball coach Dave Trumbo has a straightforward philosophy. "We preach no risk, no reward," he said. Second-ranked Liberty showed both ends of the spectrum last night in a 25-10, 25-21, 25-19 win over visiting No. 8 Winters Mill. Despite one of their poorest serving nights of the season statistically, the Lions used 10 aces and numerous other hard serves to keep the Falcons on their heels most of the night in putting away their Carroll County rivals in just 58 minutes.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | August 27, 2006
Anyone who has ever tried to give a 5-year-old an antibiotic can appreciate where Edward M. Rudnic is coming from. As the founder of Advancis Pharmaceutical Corp. in Germantown, one of his goals is to take amoxicillin and convert it to a taste-free powder that could be sprinkled on anything - even ice cream - and tots would be none the wiser. His plans are not quite a reality yet, having run into a snag in clinical testing, but Rudnic hasn't stopped trying. And he is not alone. Ever since there were drugs, science has looked for ways to improve their delivery to better satisfy doctors and patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 27, 2005
Suli Holum is playing dumb. To be specific, she's portraying the quintessential dim bulb in Garson Kanin's Born Yesterday at Washington's Arena Stage. At least that's how the character of Billie Dawn, the ex-chorus girl mistress of a racketeer, starts out. Then the racketeer hires a reporter to "smarten 'er up" so she won't embarrass him while he's trying to buy influence in Washington. After a little knowledge dawns on Billie, she outsmarts everyone. When Holum's mother, Binnie Ritchie Holum (a Washington-based actress, playwright and choreographer)
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 20, 2005
Some restaurant locations are Bermuda Triangles. New places open up and then in a few months or a few years they disappear. Not 106 W. Padonia Road. While the churn here has been considerable -- Courtney's, Rothwells, Palermo's Grill and Parlay Cafe have all occupied the space -- the restaurants have done pretty well. Courtney's, the last one, has moved to larger quarters on York Road. All this is to say that I didn't approach the newest tenant, Chris-topher Daniel, thinking, "Oh no, here we go again."
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 19, 1998
Andy Filo calls it "dentamandibular sound transduction through a consumable line." The U.S. toy industry is calling it the hottest product of 1998.Filo, a former B.F. Goodrich engineer from Ohio, is the man behind Sound Bites, a toy-candy treat that plays music in your head when you eat it. Yes, in your head. Rock and roll. Drums. Space sounds. Guitar. Saxophone. Wacky tunes and voices. Just push the buttons on the holder and your lollipop plays whatever you want.Sound Bites is being introduced in some markets this month, and is scheduled to be available in Baltimore in August.
NEWS
November 2, 2003
On October 28, 2003, PAUL "Lollipop" WHITE, SR., devoted husband of Alelia L. White; beloved father of Adrienne T. White, Paul D. WHite, Jr., Karl D. "Kamau" White and his wife Karen Shelton, and Tamara Gilman and her husband Joseph Gilman; loving grandfather of Madu, Tameisha, Robert, Amani, Wanjiru, and Njeri. Also survived by his mother Catherine Stanley Daugherty, six brothers, three sisters, and his name sake and niece, Councilwoman Paula Johnson Branch. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Nutter Funeral Home Inc., 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway, Baltimore, MD 21216, on Monday, November 3, 2003, from 3 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends in the sanctuary of the New Imani Community Church on Tuesday, November 4, 2003, at 11 until 11:45 A.M., at which time funeral service will be held.
NEWS
November 2, 2003
On October 28, 2003, PAUL "Lollipop" WHITE, SR., devoted husband of Alelia L. White; beloved father of Adrienne T. White, Paul D. WHite, Jr., Karl D. "Kamau" White and his wife Karen Shelton, and Tamara Gilman and her husband Joseph Gilman; loving grandfather of Madu, Tameisha, Robert, Amani, Wanjiru, and Njeri. Also survived by his mother Catherine Stanley Daugherty, six brothers, three sisters, and his name sake and niece, Councilwoman Paula Johnson Branch. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Nutter Funeral Home Inc., 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway, Baltimore, MD 21216, on Monday, November 3, 2003, from 3 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends in the sanctuary of the New Imani Community Church on Tuesday, November 4, 2003, at 11 until 11:45 A.M., at which time funeral service will be held.
NEWS
By Carolyn Shapiro and Jody Snider and Carolyn Shapiro and Jody Snider,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 3, 2001
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Pamela Withrow didn't think she could ever find another Lollipop. But with the help of modern genetic research, a Texas biotechnology company and her veterinarian, she now thinks she has a chance to re-create her beloved 13-year-old Yorkshire terrier. The dog wears special outfits, poses for professional photographs and is the center of Withrow's life. Lollipop also has kidney problems. So Withrow decided to spend almost $1,000, to start, to preserve her dog's genes, in hopes of later cloning her. "I don't want to not be able to do this years from now," Withrow said.
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