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By The Hollywood Reporter | July 7, 1995
Jeremy Irons is in final negotiations to star in Adrian Lyne's remake of Stanley Kubrick's 1962 classic dark comedy "Lolita."Sources said that Mr. Irons will play the part of Humbert Humbert, a gentle English professor whose life turns tragic because of his passionate love for a 12-year-old nymphet and the vengeful determination of the girl's sleazy but canny former lover.While Dianne Wiest initially had been considered for the role of Lolita's mother, sources said that discussions are under way to bring Melanie Griffith on board.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Food, spies, money, politics, education and war are on the agenda for the sixth season of the Baltimore Speakers Series, which returns in October at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Among the eight luminaries who will be speaking in the series sponsored by Stevenson University are former Washington schools superintendent Michelle Rhee, former CIA operative Valerie Plame and her husband, former Ambassador Joe Wilson, and sustainable food champion Michael Pollan. In addition, former U.S. military commander in Afghanistan Stanley McChrystal will speak, as will Azar Nafisi, author of "Reading Lolita in Tehran," and Ron Chernow, biographer of business titans J.P. Morgan and John D. Rockefeller.
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NEWS
May 30, 2002
An interview with Jane Parrish, 26-year member of Hopewell Book Club, named after a neighborhood in Columbia where the club is based. What book are members reading this month? Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. One of the members brought a list of the 100 most fascinating literary characters to a meeting, and both Lolita and the older man that was fascinated by her were on the list. Does your group read a certain kind of books? We jump all over. We do fiction, nonfiction, self-help, historical fiction.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
On December 26, 2007, WILLIAM E. JR.; husband of Vandora Perry; son of William E. Perry, Sr. and brother of Lolita Perry Richards. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue, on Sunday, after 10 A.M., where the family will receive friends on Monday at 11:30 A.M. Funeral services will follow at 12 Noon.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | June 15, 1992
"Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-tah."With that line, Vladimir Nabokov began one of the greatest American novels of the 20th century. The subject, so unthinkable in the 1950s that Nabokov had difficulty finding a publisher, was a middle-aged man's love for a young girl.If the novel's plot now seems somewhat mundane by today's desensitized, Geraldo-ized standards, the title has taken on a life of its own. You don't need to read "Lolita"-the-book to know Lolita-the-cultural-icon.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1995
In the book "Lolita," Humbert Humbert described his child lover as one with "the fey grace, the elusive, shifty, soul-shattering, insidious charm" of a nymphet, in mythology a girl with loose morals.A movie casting company -- Mike Lemon Casting of Philadelphia -- was looking for a Lolita for the '90s in Baltimore yesterday, but loose morals were out."We're seeking a beautiful All-American girl with a look that can go from being childlike to intensely erotic in a split-second, a combination of innocence and provocation," Mr. Lemon said.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 14, 1995
Talent scouts from Mike Lemon Casting of Philadelphia are holding an open casting audition tomorrow, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. They are looking for the lead in the feature film, "Lolita," which is being produced by Richard ("Jaws" and "Driving Miss Daisy") Zanuck and directed by Adrian ("Flashdance" and "Fatal Attraction") Lyne. This will be a remake of the 1962 bizarre satire about a man's unconventional obsession with a nymphet. It starred James Mason and Sue Lyon as the naughty pair and caused quite a stir in the early '60s.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | June 15, 1992
"Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-tah."With that line, Vladimir Nabokov began one of the greatest American novels of the 20th century. The subject, so unthinkable in the 1950s that Nabokov had difficulty finding a publisher, was a middle-aged man's love for a young girl.If the novel's plot now seems somewhat mundane by today's desensitized, Geraldo-ized standards, the title has taken on a life of its own. You don't need to read "Lolita"-the-book to know Lolita-the-cultural-icon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 9, 1999
Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov would have turned 100 last month. Reminded of that, I was drawn back to "Lolita," one of the great novels of the 20th century. Lolita herself would have turned 65 this year. Humbert Humbert, one of the great obsessed perversities in all literature -- and what hero is not obsessive? -- would be a doddering 92.By the grace of art and bliss, years make no difference. All three are immortal.I cannot remember exactly when I first read it. Rejected by four major American publishers, it was published in 1955 in Paris, and finally appeared in the United States in 1958, swiftly becoming enormously successful.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun staff | August 2, 1998
Sex. Violence. Language. Religion.Hot-button topics all, guaranteed to start debate in the halls of Congress, arguments at cocktail parties and controversy when brought to movie screens.Forty-seven years ago, the intense sexuality of "A Streetcar Named Desire" ruffled America's feathers. Twenty-nine years ago, the numbing violence of Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch" had audiences wondering how far Hollywood should be allowed to go. Fourteen years ago, Jean-Luc Godard's "Hail Mary" had people crying blasphemy and dousing moviegoers with holy water.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
On September 8, 2007, LASSITER; survived by loving wife, Hyla M, son, Lassiter Jr., daughter, Lolita Lowery, nine grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and a host of other family and friends. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A OF BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road on Thursday from 6-8PM. Services Friday at Gospel Tabernacle Baptist Church, 3100 Walbrook Avenue, 10:30am Wake, 11:00am Funeral. Interment following. Inquiries at www.wyliefuneralhome.com.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
BOYS Eric Lusby, Severna Park, lacrosse The senior combined for nine goals and four assists last week in victories over Annapolis and Westminster in the Class 4A-3A East regional final and the Class 4A-3A state semifinal games. With 63 goals and 29 assists this year, Lusby leads the defending 4A-3A state champions into their eighth state final in the past nine years today against Wootton (18-0) of Montgomery County. The Falcons, won titles in 1999, 2004 and last year, and were runners-up in 2000, 2002, 2003 and 2005 - all to Dulaney.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie Critic | January 26, 2007
There were two Stanley Kubricks. First came the Bronx-bred wunderkind with a chip on his soldier the size of the Triborough Bridge, ready to take on veteran Hollywood craftsmen and even producer-actors such as Kirk Douglas. This fellow came up with a parade of smart, groundbreaking features from The Killing to 2001: A Space Odyssey. Wrestling with dominating stars or maneuvering with money-men helped imbue Kubrick's films with uncanny connections to life as it is lived, even when his scenarios went back in time or out of this world.
NEWS
March 31, 2006
On March 17, 2006, CARRIE MAESTREATER, beloved daughter of Charlotte Henderson. She also leaves to cherish her precious memories two sisters Judy Brown of Washington, D.C. and Lolita Onley (William) of Baltimore, MD., two brothers Paul Corley of Baltimore, MD and Charles H. Henderson (Susan) of Beaver Falls, PA., one aunt Annie Mae Wright of Washington, D.C. and a host of other relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by four sons Butchie, Michael, Tony and John-John, three brothers and one sister.
FEATURES
By CAROLE GOLDBERG and CAROLE GOLDBERG,HARTFORD COURANT | October 25, 2005
Americans love everything new, the latest scoop, brand-new names, fresh ideas. But sometimes when it comes to reading, the hot new thing may be a great old book. When a major film adaptation or anniversary brings a classic back into the spotlight, publishers have the opportunity to recapture its earlier audience and attract new readers by "rebranding" it. Through reprints with freshly designed covers adorned with movie images, or a banner proclaiming the anniversary edition or tie-ins to other works by that author, they can make something old seem new again and further enhance an author's reputation.
NEWS
September 8, 2005
On September 5, 2005 RONALDJEROME, loving husband to Carolyn James; beloved father of Ronnica and Mykia James; step father to Lolita Stewart and Cassandra Muse; also survived by son-in-law Aaron Muse, and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Ave on Friday after 1 P.M. Family will receive friends on Saturday at the Calvary Baptist Church, 3911 Garrison Blvd, at 11:30 A.M. with Service to follow at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 1, 1999
"Lolita," Adrian Lyne's adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's unadaptable novel, is much better than it has any right to be.As anyone who has read the book knows, the artistry of "Lolita" lies in the writing, in Nabokov's cunning use of the English language in the creation of character, mood and unstoppable narrative. Unless a director were literally to photograph pages turning, why on earth bother to film it?Lyne makes a surprisingly good case in this smart, well-acted interpretation. If his version doesn't necessarily bring new insight or fresh emphasis to Nabokov's story of obsession and destruction, neither does it besmirch the original work in any way.It's a noble effort, forming a respectable bookend to Stanley Kubrick's entirely surreal stab at "Lolita" 36 years ago. And bookend is the appropriate term, because between these two relatively minor movies stands a towering work of art that is first, last and always literary.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
EVERETT, Wash. -- Three decades ago, hunters dropped nets into the deep, blue waters of Puget Sound and rounded up seven orcas, including a 6-year-old female calf caught off the rugged coastline of the San Juan Islands. Like other orcas, or killer whales, captured in Puget Sound in the mid-1960s and early 1970s, the killer whales were sold and shipped to marine parks around the world. The female calf -- who became known as Lolita -- ended up at the Miami Seaquarium, where she still lives and today is the focal point of a grass-roots campaign to return her to the wilds of the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
EVERETT, Wash. -- Three decades ago, hunters dropped nets into the deep, blue waters of Puget Sound and rounded up seven orcas, including a 6-year-old female calf caught off the rugged coastline of the San Juan Islands. Like other orcas, or killer whales, captured in Puget Sound in the mid-1960s and early 1970s, the killer whales were sold and shipped to marine parks around the world. The female calf -- who became known as Lolita -- ended up at the Miami Seaquarium, where she still lives and today is the focal point of a grass-roots campaign to return her to the wilds of the Pacific Northwest.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 5, 2002
From the beginning, British-comedy fans loved the work of Peter Sellers for its wit and sure attack and for its fillip of emotion. But it took a brilliant young American director with a hip, cosmopolitan temperament to exploit Sellers' talent fully. For his 1962 movie version of Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita -- playing tomorrow at noon at the Charles Theatre -- Stanley Kubrick chose Sellers to play what could have been a subordinate role: not Humbert Humbert (James Mason), the French-literature professor obsessed by the title nymphet (Sue Lyon)
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