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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
[Note: The above video is embedded from Scott Cover's YouTube page] When tech enterpreneuer Scott Cover happened upon a group of Baltimore Police standing over a handcuffed man near Cross Street market early Saturday, he pulled out his camera phone and started recording. Earlier in the day, he'd seen news reports of the Police Department affirming citizens' right to record officers performing their duties in public, and thought what was happening might - who knows - make for interesting video.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 15, 2012
Just hours after Baltimore police issued a directive telling its 3,100 officers that they can't arrest or seize cameras from people merely for photographing or videotaping them, officers were caught on tape seemingly doing just that. On Tuesday, the National Press Photographers Association sent a letter to Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III voicing its concern. The new video showed officers threatening to arrest a man near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill for taping an arrest.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
Baltimore County police will have an easier time arresting prostitutes thanks to anti-loitering legislation passed last night by the County Council.The measure, introduced by Councilman Donald C. Mason, D-7th, gives police the authority, after one warning, to arrest suspected prostitutes simply for loitering.Under provisions of the bill, the ladies of the night would face up to a $500 fine and 30 days in jail.The council also passed a charter amendment bill that, if approved by voters, would give each of the seven council members the authority to appoint one member to the 15-member county Planning Board.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
[Note: The above video is embedded from Scott Cover's YouTube page] When tech enterpreneuer Scott Cover happened upon a group of Baltimore Police standing over a handcuffed man near Cross Street market early Saturday, he pulled out his camera phone and started recording. Earlier in the day, he'd seen news reports of the Police Department affirming citizens' right to record officers performing their duties in public, and thought what was happening might - who knows - make for interesting video.
NEWS
May 27, 1994
County police checking out complaints of drug dealing at Pioneer Drive and Arwell Court Wednesday arrested an 18-year-old Severn man for allegedly failing to move from the intersection.Torrey Garnett, of the 8300 block of Pioneer Drive, was charged with loitering, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest, police said.Western District officers went to the intersection shortly before 7 p.m. They asked the men for identification. Police said that Mr. Garnett refused to show identification and refused to leave the corner after they pointed out a "No trespassing, No loitering" sign.
NEWS
May 13, 1999
THE ANNAPOLIS City Council can take the easy way -- and possibly the correct way -- out by awaiting the wisdom of the Supreme Court on the constitutionality of anti-loitering laws.The court is to rule next month on a challenge to an anti-loitering law in Chicago, which in 1992 gave police sweeping power to arrest suspected gang members.Chicago police may order groups of two or more people to move along if they are standing around "with no apparent purpose" and if an officer "reasonably believes" one of them to be a gang member.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1996
Complaints about teen-agers congregating and playing ball in the streets have prompted Mount Airy officials to ban loitering.The Town Council chose to adopt an anti-loitering ordinance rather than enforce Mount Airy's 22-year-old curfew law because the new law better addresses complaints about teen-agers loitering on streets.Those complaints have accused youths of damaging cars, leaving trash in streets and making noise.The ordinance was approved Oct. 7, and it prohibits anyone, not just teen-agers, from disturbing the peace, making excessive noise, obstructing traffic and harassing or annoying people on town streets.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1999
African-American community leaders and the American Civil Liberties Union are protesting an Annapolis alderman's proposal to curb loitering related to drug activity, saying such a law could prompt police officers to target and search all blacks standing on street corners.Alderman Herbert H. McMillan, a Ward 5 Republican, is expected to introduce a bill at tonight's city council meeting to tighten loitering laws by redefining public spaces to include public housing property and areas such as parking lots and playgrounds that may be privately owned but are open to the public.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
Alderman Herbert H. McMillan's campaign for the Annapolis city council two years ago took him to public housing communities where suspected drug dealers loitered on street corners.When he asked what police were doing about it, he was told they couldn't do anything. Police can make loitering arrests only on public property, and the sidewalks are the private property of the Annapolis Housing Authority.McMillan intends to change that with a bill to redefine public spaces to include public housing property and places such as parking lots and playgrounds that may be privately owned but are open to the public.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
Baltimore County police will have an easier time arresting prostitutes thanks to anti-loitering legislation passed last night by the County Council.The measure, introduced by Councilman Donald C. Mason, D-7th, gives police the authority, after one warning, to arrest suspected prostitutes simply for loitering.Under provisions of the bill, the prostitutes would face a fine of up to $500 and 30 days in jail.The council also passed a charter amendment bill that, if approved by voters, would give each of the seven council members the authority to appoint one member to the 15-member county Planning Board.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Hanging out on rowhouse steps is a typical Baltimore thing to do. Unless they're not your steps. Then you're loitering. Or trespassing. And probably up to no good. Cops spend their shifts ushering people off corners and other people's steps and they use the loitering law to stop and frisk thousands of people each year. It's harassment to some, a relief to others, and a tool for police to detain people in their war on drugs and guns. Loitering is a rarely prosecuted crime, but frustrated residents across the city have devised unique ways to try to keep people off their steps.
NEWS
By peter hermann and peter hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 17, 2008
Smoking bans imposed by the city and private businesses have no doubt made dining, drinking and working inside bars and offices more pleasant. But there is an unintended consequence. The smokers who once enjoyed their habit inside now enjoy their habit outside. For bars and offices that share streets with private homes, the result has been an increase in loiterers, noise and trash. Walk along Fort Avenue in my neighborhood or on dozens of city streets on a weekend morning and you'll see the remnants of the previous night of revelry: small piles of discarded cigarette butts outside the shuttered doors of pubs and empty beer bottles on rowhouse steps.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 20, 2007
Labor groups, immigrant advocates and city leaders applauded yesterday's opening of a Southeast Baltimore employment center, a move designed to keep day workers off street corners and provide them with jobs, training and legal assistance. Operated by the immigrant advocacy group CASA of Maryland, the refurbished brick warehouse at East Fayette and Madeira streets will offer workers an alternative to congregating at a 7-Eleven parking lot on South Broadway, a popular spot for laborers seeking temporary employment.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
The Elkton Town Council voted unanimously this week to rescind an anti-loitering ordinance that became the target of a federal lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. The group argued that the statute unfairly targeted homeless people. The ACLU challenged the constitutionality of the ordinance and sought retribution for an August 2006 incident in which the town cleared a campsite occupied by homeless people behind the Elkton Antique Mall. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of nine homeless men and women who lost their few personal belongings - a family Bible, a grandfather's watch, a birth certificate and more - during the raid.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2007
"You cannot ride your bikes on the sidewalks of a business district," Cpl. Jesse Clagett yelled to two young men pedaling onto the brick path of Locust Lane, pausing as he filled out tickets for two other males who had repeatedly ignored his warnings. Clagett, who patrols downtown on a bike for the Westminster Police Department, has increased his surveillance hours along this central courtyard across from the city's public library branch in the past week. Some Westminster residents and business owners seem to think it's making a difference.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | February 17, 2007
Fending off criminal charges for his clients has been Nicholas Panteleakis' legal career in Baltimore. But the 34-year-old city public defender recently found himself playing the role of defendant after his arrest on a loitering charge on The Block, downtown's adult entertainment district. As he left the Hustler Club, Panteleakis said, he saw two young men fighting and city police officers rushing over to break it up. Panteleakis said he asked one of the officers to use less force -- an intervention that he said ultimately led to his arrest.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
The nine-member Annapolis city council voted unanimously yesterday to designate the Newtowne Twenty housing development as a "drug-loitering-free zone" -- the state capital's first application of a disputed law passed last year. Dwight Sullivan, chief counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union, has said he will file a lawsuit within a week, asking a judge to rule the law unconstitutional. The anti-loitering law, which the council narrowly approved in October, allows Annapolis neighborhoods to apply for "drug-loitering-free zone" status.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2000
Despite a lawsuit looming in the wings, the Annapolis city council moved a step closer to enforcing its anti-loitering bill through a resolution to designate Newtowne Twenty as the city's first "drug-loitering free zone." "If that resolution is adopted, the anti-loitering bill goes into effect," Dwight Sullivan, American Civil Liberties Union staff counsel, said yesterday. "At that point, we intend to challenge it in court." The resolution was introduced Monday night and is scheduled for a vote at the council meeting Feb. 14. When the bill was approved in October, the ACLU of Maryland said it planned to file a lawsuit against the city as soon as the council designated the first loitering free zone.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN REPORTER | December 31, 2006
The Columbia Association board has approved a request by Town Center officials to post signs noting the hours that one of their playgrounds is closed to prevent teenage loitering in the evenings. It was the second village to make such a request in recent months. The Town Center Village Board asked that the association close the playground in the Banneker neighborhood from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. The suggestion came as a response to the village receiving "complaints about disruptive behavior," according to a letter addressed to the association board.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
After 4-year-old Fahad Islam was injured by a stray bullet as he sat coloring inside his home near Long Reach Village Center early this year, Howard County Police promised residents plans to make the area safer. But village officials remain concerned about loitering, a chronic complaint around the village center, despite assurances from police that overall crime in Long Reach remains under control. "What people are saying is that between the hours of 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. there are activities in the village center parking lot," Bridget R. Mugane, a village board member, told acting police Chief William McMahon after being updated on the crime situation this week.
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