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October 31, 1990
They've been dodging the question for more than 50 years, but the big day's almost here at last: Clark Kent asks Lois Lane to marry him in DC Comics' Superman No. 50 comic book, which is expected at newsstands in the next week.But once you find a copy -- they're expected to sell out quickly -- you may or may not agree with Lois' decision to accept Clark's proposal.Should she have said "I do" to the Man of Steel's alter ego -- or "too late, sucker?" Will they really make it to the altar, or will Superman have to rush out and save the world on their wedding day?
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NEWS
June 6, 2009
JOAN ALEXANDER , 94 Voice of Lois Lane Actress Joan Alexander, who was the voice of Lois Lane in the 1940s radio Superman and in an animated television version in the 1960s, died May 21 at New York Presbyterian Hospital of an intestinal ailment, according to her daughter, the novelist Jane Stanton Hitchcock. A native of St. Paul, Minn., Ms. Alexander first worked as a model before moving on to radio serials. She played the loyal secretary Della Street in Perry Mason, then characters on radio soap operas and dramas.
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NEWS
By Glenn Esterly and Glenn Esterly,ENTERTAINMENT NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 1996
Forget Phyllis Coates and Noel Neill as Lois Lane (from prime time's original "The Adventures of Superman" in the '50s). Forget the Lois in the Broadway play. Forget even the recent series of hit "Superman" movies with Margot Kidder as an updated Lois. What we have right here, sitting on a couch in her extra-large, star-size trailer is the ultimate Lois Lane, Teri Hatcher."Teri's Lois is much hotter than any before, and even hotter than last season," says Eugenie Ross-Leming, co-executive producer of ABC's "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman."
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | September 22, 2006
In the opening chorus of Kiss Me, Kate, Cole Porter rhymes "show" with "Baltimo'." Somebody should have told him we don't pronounce it that way. But that is the only thing to complain about in the show, which runs through Nov. 19 at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Kiss Me, Kate boasts Porter's finest score: "Another Op'nin', Another Show," "Why Can't You Behave?," "Wunderbar," "So in Love," "We Open in Venice," "I Hate Men," "Were Thine That Special Face," "Too Darn Hot," "Where Is the Life that Late I Led?
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
One woman told Noel Neill she had inspired all the little girls who wanted to heal patients and litigate rather than cook and clean. A graying gentleman said that as a child, he had dreamed of stealing Neill from her notably hunky on-screen boyfriend. Another man cut to the chase. "You were hot," he told the 82-year-old Neill. These are the things people say to you when they've thought of you as Lois Lane, star reporter for The Daily Planet and love interest of Superman, for the past 50 years.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 2, 1990
So what if it's taken him half a century to pop the question? Call the caterer, book the hall, send out the invites and make it a Superwedding, Lois . . .least that's what nearly 70 percent of our callers said when they responded Wednesday to our question: Should Lois Lane have said "I do" or "I don't" to Clark Kent's proposal in the Superman No. 50 comic book, which is hitting newsstands this month.Thirty-four of our 50 respondents said that the commitment-phobic reporter and his colleague at the Daily Planet should indeed tie the knot.
NEWS
June 6, 2009
JOAN ALEXANDER , 94 Voice of Lois Lane Actress Joan Alexander, who was the voice of Lois Lane in the 1940s radio Superman and in an animated television version in the 1960s, died May 21 at New York Presbyterian Hospital of an intestinal ailment, according to her daughter, the novelist Jane Stanton Hitchcock. A native of St. Paul, Minn., Ms. Alexander first worked as a model before moving on to radio serials. She played the loyal secretary Della Street in Perry Mason, then characters on radio soap operas and dramas.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 20, 1997
TCM offers legendary hoofer Ann Miller a chance to shine tonight.The evening revolves around "Private Screenings: Ann Miller" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., repeats 11 p.m.-midnight), in which the engaging Miller reflects on a Hollywood career stretching back to when she was a teen-ager (she co-starred with the Marx Brothers in "Room Service" when she was only 15).From there, the folks at Turner offer a look at some of her finest films, including the great "On the Town" (9 p.m.-11 p.m.), where she's a tap-dancing anthropologist with her eye on Jules Munshin, one of three sailors -- the others are Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra -- visiting New York while on shore leave; and "Kiss Me Kate" (midnight-2 a.m.)
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH | September 15, 1993
"TO DO NOTHING is also a good remedy," said Hippocrates.Maybe that is the very advice the Kennedy and Hannah families decided to take over last weekend when much of the media fully expected John F. Jr. and Daryl to get married in the Hamptons of Long Island, at the home of John's aunt, Lee Radziwill Ross.In spite of all the speculation, there are now those who say they were actually "invited" to attend just such a wedding. But at the last minute it was canceled because of the fever of the press.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 15, 1993
The first thing you should know about the new Superman is that he's a little, um, different from his predecessor, unless you don't mind a superhero who seems more like Potsie on the old "Happy Days" sitcom.At least this is the impression created by the opening episode of ABC's "Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman," the new series which gives us something we might not need: a Man of Steel with feelings.Whereas the old Superman was brave, stoic and humble, this Superman (played by someone named Dean Cain)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH and MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITICS | July 21, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. A Scanner Darkly, -- Richard Linklater's nightmare drug movie, should be continually compelling. But it loses its fizz after a strong series of pops. Instead of a moviemaking vision, it merely has a look: an unsettling, changeable new form of animated live action. And, instead of a lucid, original take on wigged-out junkies and the government that spies on and manipulates them, it slavishly follows Philip K. Dick's 1977 novel of the same name.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
SUPERMAN HAS ALWAYS BEEN the most uncomplicated of superheroes. He's all-powerful, as long as there's no kryptonite around. He's not conflicted, except occasionally about his feelings for Lois Lane. He's good, and kind, and really does believe in "truth, justice and the American way." He's not prone to melancholia, or skirting the law, or wishing he were someone else. Compared to other superheroes, the Man of Steel's practically Mother Teresa. Consider the brooding Batman, who these days is more vigilante than hero.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 13, 2005
It's Superman Tom De Haven Chronicle / 425 pages Tom De Haven's giddy joy ride of a novel, It's Superman!, returns the famous comic book tale to its roots in 1930s America, with Clark Kent as an awkward high school kid in rural Kansas. The story begins with Clark trying to explain to a local sheriff how a wanted criminal fired his gun point-blank at Clark but somehow ended up dead when the bullet ricocheted. For as long as Clark can remember, such unexplained things have happened to him. He emerges from serious accidents unscathed, can set fires with a focused stare, and can even drive nails into a fence post with his fist.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
One woman told Noel Neill she had inspired all the little girls who wanted to heal patients and litigate rather than cook and clean. A graying gentleman said that as a child, he had dreamed of stealing Neill from her notably hunky on-screen boyfriend. Another man cut to the chase. "You were hot," he told the 82-year-old Neill. These are the things people say to you when they've thought of you as Lois Lane, star reporter for The Daily Planet and love interest of Superman, for the past 50 years.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 15, 2002
Kiss Me Kate, the 1953 backstage comedy about the dueling lovers starring in a musical version of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, will be this weekend's Saturday matinee at the Charles. But wait, there's more! As if it isn't enough to get a rare chance to see this old-fashioned movie musical on the big screen, you'll also get to see it in 3-D, as the filmmakers originally intended. The former husband-and-wife team of Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson star here, as - and what a stretch this is!
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 20, 1997
TCM offers legendary hoofer Ann Miller a chance to shine tonight.The evening revolves around "Private Screenings: Ann Miller" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., repeats 11 p.m.-midnight), in which the engaging Miller reflects on a Hollywood career stretching back to when she was a teen-ager (she co-starred with the Marx Brothers in "Room Service" when she was only 15).From there, the folks at Turner offer a look at some of her finest films, including the great "On the Town" (9 p.m.-11 p.m.), where she's a tap-dancing anthropologist with her eye on Jules Munshin, one of three sailors -- the others are Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra -- visiting New York while on shore leave; and "Kiss Me Kate" (midnight-2 a.m.)
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 13, 2005
It's Superman Tom De Haven Chronicle / 425 pages Tom De Haven's giddy joy ride of a novel, It's Superman!, returns the famous comic book tale to its roots in 1930s America, with Clark Kent as an awkward high school kid in rural Kansas. The story begins with Clark trying to explain to a local sheriff how a wanted criminal fired his gun point-blank at Clark but somehow ended up dead when the bullet ricocheted. For as long as Clark can remember, such unexplained things have happened to him. He emerges from serious accidents unscathed, can set fires with a focused stare, and can even drive nails into a fence post with his fist.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 15, 2002
Kiss Me Kate, the 1953 backstage comedy about the dueling lovers starring in a musical version of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, will be this weekend's Saturday matinee at the Charles. But wait, there's more! As if it isn't enough to get a rare chance to see this old-fashioned movie musical on the big screen, you'll also get to see it in 3-D, as the filmmakers originally intended. The former husband-and-wife team of Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson star here, as - and what a stretch this is!
NEWS
By Glenn Esterly and Glenn Esterly,ENTERTAINMENT NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 1996
Forget Phyllis Coates and Noel Neill as Lois Lane (from prime time's original "The Adventures of Superman" in the '50s). Forget the Lois in the Broadway play. Forget even the recent series of hit "Superman" movies with Margot Kidder as an updated Lois. What we have right here, sitting on a couch in her extra-large, star-size trailer is the ultimate Lois Lane, Teri Hatcher."Teri's Lois is much hotter than any before, and even hotter than last season," says Eugenie Ross-Leming, co-executive producer of ABC's "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1995
The black lines took on familiar shape as Jack Meckler flicked a felt pen across his sketch pad."It's Jiggs . . . and Maggie," audience members chorused as he drew.Next came Popeye and Olive Oyl, Dagwood and Blondie, Alley Oop and Oola, Dick Tracy and Tess Trueheart, Li'l Abner and Daisy Mae, Superman and Lois Lane -- all familiar comic strip couples that Mr. Meckler used to provoke happy memories among his senior-citizen audience."It takes you back to the old days, makes you feel young again," said Hilda Hanson, 79, of Perry Hall.
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