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By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | January 16, 1991
Logitech Inc., which says it is the world's largest manufacturer of computer pointing devices, has created a new family of ergonomically designed mice, including big ones and little ones, left-handed ones and right-handed ones, even one that has had its tail cut off. All of them are lopsided and have three ears.The Logitech Mouseman mice introduced last week were designed by Frogdesign, an industrial design concern that has won many honors for innovation.The unconventional styling is a function of ergonomic design as well as aesthetics.
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BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 17, 2007
I purchased a Logitech Webcam so I could video-call friends and family. I've had it about a year and a half and have yet to get it to work. When I download the video-call software from the Logitech site, I get a message saying I don't have the privileges or permissions to perform the task. I have tried every "Administrator" log-on I know but to no success. My computer is a Gateway running Windows XP Pro. I am trying to uninstall and reinstall the software. I don't know what else to do. Logitech support says it is a problem with my computer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2002
Logitech model expands cordless possibilities at home Logitech has expanded its cordless approach to the telephone - at least as far as the PC is concerned. The Cordless Telephone and PC Headset System ($75) enables you to chat on the telephone, then switch to PC voice chat, then, if you want, use your speech recognition program on your computer. Three components make up the Logitech telephone: the base station, a remote that clips to your belt and the headset. Installation takes only a few moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | June 13, 2002
Doing even a minuscule amount of writing on a personal digital assistant can be a joyless task. To add a little ease to the process, Logitech has come up with the KeyCase ($100), a combination soft-cloth, tri-fold PDA case and miniature QWERTY keyboard with "hot keys." You should back up all of the information inside your PDA with a HotSync connection to your Windows or Macintosh PC before starting installation. Once your data are saved to the computer, you insert a software disk into your computer to upload Logitech's TypeAway, AppCentral and other software onto your PDA. That done, unfold the KeyCase and plug your PDA into a socket on a cradle attached to the keyboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | June 13, 2002
Doing even a minuscule amount of writing on a personal digital assistant can be a joyless task. To add a little ease to the process, Logitech has come up with the KeyCase ($100), a combination soft-cloth, tri-fold PDA case and miniature QWERTY keyboard with "hot keys." You should back up all of the information inside your PDA with a HotSync connection to your Windows or Macintosh PC before starting installation. Once your data are saved to the computer, you insert a software disk into your computer to upload Logitech's TypeAway, AppCentral and other software onto your PDA. That done, unfold the KeyCase and plug your PDA into a socket on a cradle attached to the keyboard.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 17, 2007
I purchased a Logitech Webcam so I could video-call friends and family. I've had it about a year and a half and have yet to get it to work. When I download the video-call software from the Logitech site, I get a message saying I don't have the privileges or permissions to perform the task. I have tried every "Administrator" log-on I know but to no success. My computer is a Gateway running Windows XP Pro. I am trying to uninstall and reinstall the software. I don't know what else to do. Logitech support says it is a problem with my computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2000
Lapstation brings relief when laptops too hot to handle One of the problems with laptop computers is they're not that comfortable in your lap. Some get hot enough from their blazing fast microprocessors that you could break a sweat cruising the Web. Finding a good work position can be tricky, too, when sitting in bed or stretched out on the grass. As one solution, Intrigo Inc. has introduced a highly stylized product, the Lapstation. It's kind of like a souped-up plastic version of the folding tray you might use for breakfast in bed. The top-of-the-line model that I tested, the titanium-colored B3, retails for $189.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2000
Lansonic device offers flexibility for MP3 playback Lansonic's DAS-750 is designed as a link between a stereo system and a computer network. Like a home entertainment component in appearance, the $995 DAS-750 has a 20-gigabyte internal hard drive that can store about 345 hours of MP3-encoded music. But MP3 storage is just part of what the DAS-750 has to offer. It has a built-in Ethernet adapter that allows this digital audio server to join a network. Once connected, the DAS-750 can play MP3s from other computers' shared folders or copy the files to its hard drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | November 5, 2001
Small Logitech mouse offers laptop users comfort and accuracy Some mice created for travelers toting notebook computers have been shrunk to a point where they're no more comfortable to handle than a real, live rodent. Logitech, however, has come up with a smaller-than-normal mouse that takes more of a slim-line approach to designing a functional mouse for laptops. The Logitech MouseMan Traveler ($50) is an optical mouse that measures 3.29-by-1-by-2 inches and comes with a 3-foot cable that has a Universal Serial Bus port plug and a PS/2 port adapter attached.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2002
Logitech game wheel brings feel of racing to players' hands For driving-simulation fans, racing with a game console's standard controller just doesn't feel right. But when you take the cars out for a spin with Logitech's Driving Force steering wheel and pedals for the PlayStation 2, and the races get interesting. The "force feedback" on the steering wheel of this gizmo allows players to feel the bumps in the road and the impact of the crashes. If you hit a wall, the wheel will jerk in the opposite direction, as in real life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2002
Logitech game wheel brings feel of racing to players' hands For driving-simulation fans, racing with a game console's standard controller just doesn't feel right. But when you take the cars out for a spin with Logitech's Driving Force steering wheel and pedals for the PlayStation 2, and the races get interesting. The "force feedback" on the steering wheel of this gizmo allows players to feel the bumps in the road and the impact of the crashes. If you hit a wall, the wheel will jerk in the opposite direction, as in real life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2002
Logitech model expands cordless possibilities at home Logitech has expanded its cordless approach to the telephone - at least as far as the PC is concerned. The Cordless Telephone and PC Headset System ($75) enables you to chat on the telephone, then switch to PC voice chat, then, if you want, use your speech recognition program on your computer. Three components make up the Logitech telephone: the base station, a remote that clips to your belt and the headset. Installation takes only a few moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | November 5, 2001
Small Logitech mouse offers laptop users comfort and accuracy Some mice created for travelers toting notebook computers have been shrunk to a point where they're no more comfortable to handle than a real, live rodent. Logitech, however, has come up with a smaller-than-normal mouse that takes more of a slim-line approach to designing a functional mouse for laptops. The Logitech MouseMan Traveler ($50) is an optical mouse that measures 3.29-by-1-by-2 inches and comes with a 3-foot cable that has a Universal Serial Bus port plug and a PS/2 port adapter attached.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2000
Lansonic device offers flexibility for MP3 playback Lansonic's DAS-750 is designed as a link between a stereo system and a computer network. Like a home entertainment component in appearance, the $995 DAS-750 has a 20-gigabyte internal hard drive that can store about 345 hours of MP3-encoded music. But MP3 storage is just part of what the DAS-750 has to offer. It has a built-in Ethernet adapter that allows this digital audio server to join a network. Once connected, the DAS-750 can play MP3s from other computers' shared folders or copy the files to its hard drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2000
Lapstation brings relief when laptops too hot to handle One of the problems with laptop computers is they're not that comfortable in your lap. Some get hot enough from their blazing fast microprocessors that you could break a sweat cruising the Web. Finding a good work position can be tricky, too, when sitting in bed or stretched out on the grass. As one solution, Intrigo Inc. has introduced a highly stylized product, the Lapstation. It's kind of like a souped-up plastic version of the folding tray you might use for breakfast in bed. The top-of-the-line model that I tested, the titanium-colored B3, retails for $189.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | January 16, 1991
Logitech Inc., which says it is the world's largest manufacturer of computer pointing devices, has created a new family of ergonomically designed mice, including big ones and little ones, left-handed ones and right-handed ones, even one that has had its tail cut off. All of them are lopsided and have three ears.The Logitech Mouseman mice introduced last week were designed by Frogdesign, an industrial design concern that has won many honors for innovation.The unconventional styling is a function of ergonomic design as well as aesthetics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2001
Although portable digital audio players are a cool idea, they all suffer from one major drawback - they don't hold much music. Without expensive, add-on memory cards, few can store more than an hour's worth of your favorite tunes. Now Intel has raised the bar with its Pocket Concert, a nifty little $300 player that doubles the industry standard with 128 megabytes of storage - enough for at least two hours of near CD-quality music. If you exhaust that, a pushbutton activates an FM radio with up to 10 preset channels.
BUSINESS
By Anne Eisenberg and Anne Eisenberg,New York Times News Service | May 31, 2007
Couch potatoes who don't like the clutter of four or five remote controls can buy a single version to rule the television, cable box, DVD player, stereo and even the lighting system. Most of these devices use clickers or buttons the way standard remotes do, but a few luxury versions use colorful touch screens as control panels. The remotes can be programmed so that one click or touch sets off a series of actions. Touch "Watch a DVD" on the screen, and the gadget flips on the television, turns on the DVD player and even pops open the bay where the DVD is inserted.
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